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L.G. Houck and J.F. Jenner

Hot water immersion of citrus fruit is a potential postharvest quarantine treatment for insect disinfestation. Little is known about fruit injury in the temp. ranges/exposure times required to control surface insects. We immersed lemons in water at 25, 50, 52.5 or 55C for 5, 7.5 or 10 min. Fruits were held overnight at 20, 25 or 30C before hot water immersion. Fruits were stored at 10C for 4 wk after treatment. We compared (1) fresh-picked late-season (July-Aug.) coastal “silver” maturity lemons with (2) fresh-picked ripe but green-colored early/mid-season (Oct.) desert lemons and (3) similar desert lemons commercially degreened 7 days with ethylene to attain desirable yellow color prior to heat treatment. Heat injury symptoms were small-large light-dark brown necrotic lesions or discoloration which developed on peel surface within 2-3 wk after treatment. Order of sensitivity to heat was: most sensitive = coastal silver (≥ 90% of fruit injured at 55C/10 min) > degreened desert > green (≥ 34% of fruit injured at 55C/10 min) desert lemons. Up to 50C/5 min could be used on coastal and 52.5C/5 min on desert lemons without appreciable injury. There were no differences between fruit cured overnight at 20, 25 or 30C before heat treatments.

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Jaume Lordan, Terence L. Robinson, Mario Miranda Sazo, Win Cowgill, Brent L. Black, Leslie Huffman, Kristy Grigg-McGuffin, Poliana Francescatto, and Steve McArtney

on Promalin ® , with no differences between MaxCel ® sprayed–trees and control trees. Phytotoxicity was very low with all the treatments except trees sprayed with Tiberon™ SC which had higher amounts of phytotoxicity. On those trees, high

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Barrett R. Gruber, Libby R.R. Davies, and Patricia S. McManus

. 93 512 518 Holb, I.J. Schnabel, G. 2005 Effect of fungicide treatments and sanitation practices on brown rot blossom blight incidence, phytotoxicity, and yield for organic sour cherry production Plant Dis. 89

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Gregory R. Armel, Robert J. Richardson, Henry P. Wilson, Brian W. Trader, Cory M. Whaley, and Thomas E. Hines

, halosulfuron, has provided reduced phytotoxicity on pepper when compared with rimsulfuron ( Stall 1999 ). The objective of this research was to determine if POST applications of several ALS-inhibiting herbicides would provide selective broadleaf weed control in

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James D. Spiers, Fred T. Davies Jr., Chuanjiu He, Carlos E. Bográn, Kevin M. Heinz, Terri W. Starman, and Amanda Chau

This study evaluated the influence of insecticides on gas exchange, chlorophyll content, vegetative and floral development, and plant quality of gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii Bolus `Festival Salmon'). Insecticides from five chemical classes were applied weekly at 1× or 4× their respective recommended concentration. The insecticides used were abamectin (Avid), acephate (Orthene), bifenthrin (Talstar), clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil (Triact), and spinosad (Conserve). Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were reduced in plants treated with neem oil. Plants treated with neem oil flowered later—and at 4× the recommended label concentration had reduced growth, based on lower vegetative dry mass (DM) and total aboveground DM, reduced leaf area, thicker leaves (lower specific leaf area), higher chlorophyll content (basal leaves), and reduced flower production. Plants treated with acephate at 4× the recommended label concentration were of the lowest quality due to extensive phytotoxicity (leaf chlorosis). Plants treated with 1× or 4× abamectin or spinosad were of the highest quality due to no phytotoxicity and no thrips damage (thrips naturally migrated into the greenhouse). The control plants and plants treated with 1× bifenthrin had reduced quality because of thrips feeding damage; however gas exchange was not negatively affected.

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Olivia M. Lenahan and Matthew D. Whiting

This article reports on the physiological effects and horticultural benefits of chemical blossom thinners on 9-year-old and 12-year-old `Bing'/`Gisela®5′ sweet cherry trees in 2004 and 2005, respectively. Chemical thinning agents were applied at 20% and 80% full bloom (FB) by air-blast sprayer and were comprised of: 2% ammonium thiosulphate (ATS), 4% vegetable oil emulsion (VOE), 2% fish oil + 2.5% lime sulfur (FOLS), 1% tergitol, and an untreated control. Leaf gas exchange, leaf SPAD meter readings, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, fruit yield, and fruit quality were evaluated. FOLS, tergitol, VOE, and ATS suppressed leaf net CO2 exchange rate (NCER) by 33%, 30%, 28%, and 18%, respectively, over a variable length recovery period directly after 80% FB treatment. Leaf NCER recovered fully from every thinning treatment. Reductions in leaf NCER were unrelated to gS. VOE reduced estimated leaf chlorophyll content the greatest, suppressing overall levels by 11% for 23 days after treatment. All blossom thinners reduced constant fluorescence (Fo). No thinning agent reduced fruit set or yield in 2004. ATS, FOLS, and tergitol reduced fruit set in 2005. VOE was ineffective as a thinner yet exhibited significant leaf phytotoxicity. Among thinners, there was no relationship between inhibition of leaf NCER and thinning efficacy.

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John E. Kaminski, Peter H. Dernoeden, and Cale A. Bigelow

The tolerance of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) seedlings to many herbicides has not been evaluated. Three field studies were conducted between fall and spring from 1998 to 2002 to assess creeping bentgrass seedling tolerance to five herbicides and paclobutrazol. The primary objectives of this investigation were to assess bentgrass tolerance to these chemicals when applied at various timings following seedling emergence, and establishment of new seedlings as influenced by potential soil residues in the spring following a fall application of the chemicals. Treatments were applied 2, 4, or 7 weeks after either `Crenshaw' or `L-93' creeping bentgrass seedlings had emerged. Siduron (6.7 and 9.0 kg·ha-1) and bensulide (8.4 kg·ha-1) were noninjurious when applied two weeks after seedling emergence (2 WASE). Bensulide (14 kg·ha-1), ethofumesate (0.84 kg·ha-1), prodiamine (0.36 kg·ha-1) and paclobutrazol (0.14 kg·ha-1) were too injurious to apply 2 WASE, but they were generally safe to apply at 4 WASE. Chlorsulfuron (0.14 kg·ha-1) was extremely phytotoxic to seedlings when applied 2 WASE. Plots were treated with glyphosate and overseeded the following spring. The overwintering soil residuals of prodiamine and bensulide (14.0 kg·ha-1) unacceptably reduced spring establishment. All other herbicides and paclobutrazol had little or no adverse residual effects on spring establishment. Chemical names used: N-(phosphonomethyl)gycline (glyphosate); (±)-(R*,R*)-beta-[(4-chlorophenyl)methyl]-alpha-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-ethanol (paclobutrazol); 2-ethoxy-2,3-dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-5-benzofuranyl methanesulfonate (ethofumesate); S-(0,0-diisopropyl phosphorodithioate) ester of N-(2-mercaptoethyl) benzenesulfonamide (bensulide); [1-(2-methylcyclohexyl)-3-phenylurea] (siduron); N3,N3-di-n-propyl-2,4-dinitro-6-(trifluoromethyl)-m-phenylenediamine (prodiamine); 2-chloro-N-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)aminocarbonyl] benzenesulfonamide (chlorsulfuron).

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Gary L. McDaniel, William E. Klingeman, Willard T. Witte, and Phillip C. Flanagan

One-half (18 g·ha-1 a.i.) and three-fourths (27 g·ha-1 a.i.) rates of halosulfuron (Manage®, MON 12051) were combined with adjuvants and evaluated for effectiveness in controlling purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus L.) and for phytotoxic responses exhibited by two kinds of container-grown ornamental plants. Adjuvants included X-77®, Scoil®, Sun-It II®, Action “99”®, and Agri-Dex®. By 8 weeks after treatment (WAT), halosulfuron combined with X-77®, Agri-Dex®, or Action “99”® at the lower halosulfuron rate provided <90% purple nutsedge suppression. In contrast, Sun-It II® provided 100% control when combined with the higher halosulfuron rate. Nutsedge control persisted into the following growing season and halosulfuron combined with either Scoil® or Sun-It II® provided >97% suppression of nutsedge tuber production. Growth of liriope [Liriope muscari (Decne.) Bailey `Big Blue'] was not inhibited by Scoil® or Sun-It II® adjuvants in combination with the low rate of halosulfuron. However, regardless of the rate of halosulfuron or adjuvant used, initial foliar chlorosis was observed in both daylily (Hemerocallis sp. L. `Stella d'Oro') and liriope. All liriope receiving halosulfuron with X-77®, Scoil®, or Sun-It II® adjuvants recovered normal foliage by 8 WAT. By contrast, at 8 WAT some daylily still maintained a degree of foliar discoloration. In addition to chlorosis, all treatments reduced flower number in daylilies. The number of flower scapes produced by liriope was not affected by halosulfuron when in combination with either Sun-It II® or Scoil®. The high rate of halosulfuron combined with X-77® or Action “99”® improved control of purple nutsedge. However, this rate inhibited growth of both species, daylily flower numbers, and scape numbers of liriope, regardless of adjuvant. Chemical names used: halosulfuron (Manage®, MON 12051, methyl 5-{[(4,6-dimethyl-2-pyrimidinyl) amino] carbonyl-aminosulfonyl}-3-chloro-1-methyl-1-H-pyrozole-4-carboxylate); proprietary blends of 100% methylated seed oil (Scoil® and Sun-It II®); proprietary blend of 99% polyalkyleneoxide modified heptamethyl trisiloxane and nonionic surfactants (Action “99”®); alkylarylpolyoxyethylene, alkylpolyoxyethelene, fatty acids, glycols, dimethylpolysiloxane, and isopropanol (X-77®); proprietary blend of 83% paraffin-based petroleum oil, with 17% polyoxyethylate polyol fatty acid ester and polyol fatty ester as nonionic surfactants (Agri-Dex®)

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Christopher R. Johnston and Gerald M. Henry

control options are currently limited for dallisgrass. One of the most common control programs is the use of sequential monosodium methanearsonate (MSMA) applications; however, this may present phytotoxicity concerns to warm-season turfgrasses (Henry et al

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Susan L.F. Meyer, Inga A. Zasada, Shannon M. Rupprecht, Mark J. VanGessel, Cerruti R.R. Hooks, Matthew J. Morra, and Kathryne L. Everts

, including timing and rates of application ( Meyer et al., 2011 ; Rothlisberger et al., 2012 ; Snyder et al., 2009 ). Because of potential phytotoxicity, application of mustard seed meals as biofumigants must be timed to avoid phytotoxicity to crop plants