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Iftikhar Ahmad, John M. Dole, and Frank A. Blazich

.E. Bingham, G.E. 1974 Rapid estimates of relative water content Plant Physiol. 5 58 60 Staby, G.L. Basel, R.M. Reid, M.S. Dodge, L.L. 1993 Efficacies of commercial anti-ethylene products for fresh cut flowers HortTechnology 3 199 202 Taylor, G. Davies, W

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Zhengrong Hu, Erick Amombo, Margaret Mukami Gitau, Aoyue Bi, Huihui Zhu, Liang Zhang, Liang Chen, and Jinmin Fu

. Consistently, a better growth condition was also observed in the WBD128 ( Supplemental Fig. 1 ). Fig. 1. Change of relative water content (RWC) in cold-resistant bermudagrass genotype WBD128 and cold-sensitive genotype WBDg17 under chilling stress. CK was the

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Zhou Li, Yan Peng, and Bingru Huang

a scale of 1 to 9 according to color, density, and uniformity of turfgrass ( Beard, 2001 ). Leaf relative water content (RWC) or electrolyte leakage (EL) was detected by using the method of Barrs and Weatherley (1962) or Blum and Ebercon (1981

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Sanalkumar Krishnan and Emily B. Merewitz

= completely dead plants ( Beard, 2001 )]. Leaf relative water content was determined by the Barrs and Weatherley (1962) method. Briefly, ≈10 mature leaves were harvested from plants and weighed immediately to determine the fresh weight (FW). The leaves were

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Zhou Li, Yan Peng, and Bingru Huang

for 2 d. Fig. 2. The effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on relative water content ( A ) under well-watered condition, ( B ) under heat stress, and ( C ) under drought stress in creeping bentgrass under normal water condition, heat stress, and

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Vicente Gimeno, James P. Syvertsen, Inma Simon, Vicente Martinez, Jose M. Camara-Zapata, Manuel Nieves, and Francisco Garcia-Sanchez

potential (ψ S ) at full turgor (Ψ π 100 ) and leaf relative water content (RWC) in flooded and non-flooded ‘Verna’ lemon (VL) trees grafted on ‘Sour’ orange (SO) rootstock, either without an interstock (VL/SO) or interstocked with ‘Valencia’ orange (VL

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Cynthia B. McKenney and Marihelen Kamp-Glass

The effectiveness of antitranspirant type and concentration on the leaf water relations of Saliva splendens F. `Firebird and Petunia × hybrida Juss. `Comanche'. Two film-forming antitranspirants, Cloud Cover and Folicote, were tested at three different concentrations in two different environments. The leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, and relative water content were evaluated. Transpiration per unit vapor pressure deficit and stomatal conductance for both crops decrease slightly but there was no trend with respect to the film type, environment or concentration rate. The leaf water potentials and relative water content did not show significant difference after antitranspirant application. In order for antitranspirant application to be of benefit to the growth of herbaceous plants, a more durable coating that remains semipermeable would have to be utilized.

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L. Urban, R. Brun, and P. Pyrrha

Rose plants (Rosa hybrids cv. Sonia) were grown in rockwool in two heated greenhouses: one with relative humidity (RH) control (RH >70%) provided by high-pressure mist, the other protected against overheating using a movable screen without RH control. Two electrical conductivity (EC) rates were applied: high (EC of drainage water ≈ 3.8 mS·cm-1) and low (EC of drainage water ≈1.8 mS·cm-1). Under these conditions, water deficit in plants was due mainly to climate, and not to EC. The relative water content of sample leaves picked at noon (RWCnoon) was one to two percentage points higher in the greenhouse with RH control and dropped by 6% to 7% in summer. RWCnoon was unaffected by differences in EC. The average elastic modulus (E) and the relative water content threshold for turgor loss (RWC0) were reduced in the greenhouse with RH control. ϵ was increased in the high EC treatment, but RWC0 remained unaffected.

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Jennifer Marohnic, Robert Geneve, and Jack W. Buxton

Capillary mats were used to vary the water content in oasis blocks during mist propagation of chrysanthemum cuttings. Mats placed on the surface of the propagation bench extended over the edge of the bench and downward a distance of either 0 or 20 cm. Oasis blocks with chrysanthemum cuttings `Boaloi' and `Salmon Charm' were placed on mats under intermittent mist (10 seconds every 5 minutes) between 5 am and 8 pm. Relative water content, mL of water/gram oasis, and leaf water potential were measured at noon every 5 days. After 26 days number of roots per cutting was evaluated. Water content in the oasis block was reduced by 49% (450 to 219 mL/g dry weight of oasis) by hanging the capillary mat 20 cm over the edge of the bench compared to 0 cm treatment. Cuttings showed an increase in leaf relative water content from 49% and 51% at day 1 to 65% and 71% by day 11 for `Boaloi' and `Salmon Charm', respectively. Following initial root formation, leaf relative water content increased to 85%. Over the course of the experiment `Boaloi' and `Salmon Charm' showed an average reduction in leaf water potential of 0.14 and 0.08 MPA, respectively. `Boaloi' showed overall higher root numbers than `Salmon Charm'; however, no difference in rooting between mat treatments was observed.

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Emad Bsoul, Rolston St. Hilaire, and Dawn M. VanLeeuwen

irrigated before water relations data were recorded. Relative water content. On 11 Nov. 2003, 81 d after the start of irrigation treatments, the experiment was ended. A fully expanded leaf was excised from each tree in each of the five blocks. Leaves