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Annette L. Wszelaki and Bryan Brunner

Poster Session 39—Organic Production 30 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Wendy A. Johnson, Raymond A. Cloyd, James R. Nechols, Kimberly A. Williams, Nathan O. Nelson, Dorith Rotenberg, and Megan M. Kennelly

Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient that crops require for growth and development ( Jones, 1998 ; Raven and Smith, 1976 ). The availability and form of N may vary depending on fertilizer type. Organic fertilizers, which are derived from natural

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Mahrizal, L. Lanier Nalley, Bruce L. Dixon, and Jennie Popp

The mounting concerns about food safety, health, environmental, and social welfare issues have increased demand for organic cocoa products in high-income countries. Euromonitor International [as cited in International Cocoa Organization (ICCO

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James Ferguson*

Cover crops, cultivation, flaming, soil solarization, and mulching are commonly used for weed control in organic production systems. However, several new herbicides, approved by the Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI), are recommended as contact, non-selective, post-emergence herbicides for annual grasses and broadleaf weeds. Citric acid (Alldown), clove oil (Matran 2), thyme/clove oil (XPRESS) were compared with glyphosate (Roundup Pro), a systemic broad spectrum herbicide, at three sites in southern and north central Florida during September and October, 2003. Treatments varied at each site but included glyphosate (5% a.i. applied to runoff) organic herbicides at recommended rates (undiluted citrus acid at 61 L·ha-1; 10% clove oil at 76 L·ha-1; 10% clove oil/thyme oil at 76 L·ha-1) and at twice recommended concentrations and application rates. Grasses and broadleaf weed species were different at each site but included Alexander grass, bahia grass, Bermudagrass, carpetweed, crabgrass, hairy indigo, lambs quarters, Florida pusley, goatweed, nutsedge, pigweed, shrubby primrose willow, broadleaf signalgrass, southern sandbur, spurge, torpedograss, and citrus rootstock seedlings. Weed control with the organic herbicides at all three sites at recommended and at higher concentrations and rates was inconsistent, ranging from 10% to 40%, compared with 100% control with glyphosate. Labels for the organic herbicides generally specify application to actively growing weeds less than 10 cm tall, emphasizing their use as early season herbicides. Fall applications to larger weeds, some within the specified maturity and size range and others taller and producing seed, could partially explain poor weed control.

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Kristen Harper and Curt R. Rom

Poster Session 44—Organic Production 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Angela R. Davis, Charles L. Webber III, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Julie Collins, and Vincent M. Russo

Poster Session 39—Organic Production 30 July 2006, 1:15–2:00 p.m.

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Graham Sanders, Elsa Sanchez, and Kathleen Demchak

Poster Session 12—Organic/Sustainable Horticulture 28 July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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Nicole E. Burkhard, Derek H. Lynch, and David C. Percival

Poster Session 12—Organic/Sustainable Horticulture 28 July 2006, 12:00–12:45 p.m.

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Lisa W. DeVetter, David Granatstein, Elizabeth Kirby, and Michael Brady

, 1994 ). Coinciding with this growth in consumption is the increase of organic blueberry production. Organic blueberry production has been particularly significant in the western United States, with Washington State leading production in the region [U

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Valérie Gravel, Martine Dorais, and Claudine Ménard

using synthetic and well-balanced fertilizers in excess of plant uptake, organic horticulture is based on an integrated agrosystem using organic fertilizer input ( Dorais, 2007 ). Because greenhouse vegetables are produced under an intensive growing