Search Results

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 912 items for :

  • "new cultivar" x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Ah-Chiou Lee, Fang-Shin Liao, and Hsiao-Feng Lo

infer MMY responses in plants of the same cultivar. Feasibility of integrating plant growth characteristics for developing a new cultivar for high-tunnel use. The daily aboveground fresh weight of ‘Taoyuan No.3’ was consistently higher than that of its

Free access

Jeff Olsen

( Vidyasagar et al., 2010 ). These genotypes are being integrated into the OSU Hazelnut Breeding Program to produce new cultivars expressing a wide diversity of genes for resistance to EFB ( Honglin et al., 2007 ). The Arbor Day Foundation began a Hazelnut

Open access

Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi and Donald S. Bailey

new cultivars for the UVI Commercial Aquaponics System. Yield per area is a primary concern so that cultivars with the greatest biomass can be selected to maximize the production per area. Plant height, width, leaf area, number of leaves, and other

Free access

R. L. Fery and P. D. Dukes

Bettersnap southernpea (Vigna unguiculata) was developed as a replacement for the popular cultivar Snapea. The new cultivar is well adapted for production throughout the southern United States where it can be expected to produce excellent yields of edible pods or snaps. Bettersnap is resistant to root knot, a severe root disease incited by several species of the root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.), and blackeye cowpea mosaic virus, the major pathogen of southernpea in the United States. Observations of natural epiphytotics indicate that the cultivar is also resistant to scab (Cladosporium vignae) and cercospora leaf spot (Cercospora cruenta). The new cultivar has the same maturity and high yield potential as Snapea. Bettersnap is recommended for use as a home garden cultivar for spring, mid-season, and fall plantings. It is particularly recommended for trial as a commercial processing cultivar for the production of the immature green pods used for the ``snap” component of the popular mixed packs of fresh peas and green snaps.

Free access

R. L. Fery and P. D. Dukes

The Agricultural Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture announced the release of `Bettergro Blackeye' southernpea on 24 July 1991. The new cultivar is well adapted for production throughout the southern United States where it can be expected to produce excellent yields of high quality, blackeye-type peas. `Bettergro Blackeye' outyielded the `Pinkeye Purple Hull-BVR' check in the 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989 Regional Southernpea Cooperative Trials by 34.8, 14.3, 12.6, and 20.9%, respectively. Canned samples of fresh `Bettergro Blackeye' peas scored well in three years of quality evaluation tests. The new cultivar is resistant to the cowpea curculio, the major insect pest of the southernpea in southeastern production areas, and root knot, a severe root disease incited by several species of the root-knot nematode. `Bettergro Blackeye' plants have a greater tendency to produce a second crop than plants of most southernpea cultivars.

Free access

José M. López-Aranda, Carmen Soria, Luis Miranda, José F. Sánchez-Sevilla, Josefa Gálvez, Rosalía Villalba, Fernando Romero, Berta De Los Santos, Juan J. Medina, Javier Palacios, Emilio Bardón, Antonio Arjona, Antonio Refoyo, Anselmo Martínez-Treceño, Antoñeta De Cal, Paloma Melgarejo, and Rafael Bartual

Aguedilla is a short-day strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) cultivar obtained by the Spanish public breeding program (Agreement CC01-0008-F1). 'Aguedilla' produces excellent extra-early, early, mid-season, and late-season large-sized, wedge-shaped fruit, and a low percentage of second quality fruit. An agronomic and sensorial characterization of this new cultivar, in comparison with the well-adapted cultivars 'Camarosa', 'Medina', and 'Ventana', was undertaken during the 2002–03 and 2003–04 crop seasons.

Free access

M. Hubbard, J. Kelly, S. Rajapakse, A. Abbott, and R. Ballard

We have identified cloned rose DNA fragments that detect restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in rose (Rosa ×hybrida) cultivars. RFLP can be used as genetic markers for identification, certification, and patent protection. By comparing RFLP patterns for each of six probes, we have been able to characterize eight cultivars. These results confirm that RFLP analyses are useful for rose cultivar identification and may provide a means for protecting patent rights to new cultivars.

Free access

Neil O. Anderson and Richard T. Olsen

to be a self-sustaining, profitable, and non-conventional nursery selling the entire product line of a new cultivar or crop only to wholesale firms instead of selling as retail ( Howard, 1945 ). Several large firms participated in this endeavor, both

Free access

Todd C. Wehner

Individuals knowing of new cultivars to add to the list, or corrections to be made in the published lists are encouraged to contact TCW ( todd_wehner@ncsu.edu ). The assistance of Shannon Woods (American Seed Trade Association), and Marie

Free access

Chad E. Finn, Andrew L. Thomas, Patrick L. Byers, and Sedat Serçe

, but this was not reliably the case. As new cultivars are developed in Missouri, it will be necessary to trial them in the Pacific Northwest to determine whether they have sufficient yield to be commercially viable there. Across the locations in