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Charles D. Safley, Otilia Boldea, and Gina E. Fernandez

This study identified the costs associated with growing, harvesting, and marketing blackberries (Rubus subgenus Rubus) and estimated the revenues and breakeven yields for various combinations of pick-your-own (PYO) and wholesale blackberry prices. The total cost of producing, harvesting, and marketing the blackberries was estimated to be $15,514/acre if the marketable yield was 10,000 lb/acre in the second year of production, and $19,561/acre if the yield was 12,500 lb/acre. Labor was the greatest expense category after the planting started producing fruit, totaling $13,739/acre, or 70% of the total costs, when full production was reached in the third year. Net revenues for varying combinations of PYO and wholesale market prices and yields were estimated, assuming that half of the marketable fruit would be sold at a PYO operation and the remaining half sold to wholesale markets. This analysis showed that if growers received $1.25 and $2.50/lb for PYO and wholesale fruit, respectively, they would have to sell a minimum of 10,066 lb/acre to cover the estimated costs for the third through the ninth years. A return to land and management of $3876/acre would be realized if growers received $1.25/lb for PYO and $2.50/lb wholesale with yields of 12,500 lb/acre. Profitability analysis reveals that blackberry production using recommended practices can be a profitable venture. The annual net cash flow is positive after the planting is established and enough revenues are projected to be generated to cover start-up expenses in the fifth year.

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Allen D. Owings

The LSU Agricultural Center and Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Association initiated an ornamental plant promtion, marketing, and recommendation program in 1996. Called `Louisiana Select', this program is intended to actively promote outstanding ornamental plants to Louisiana's gardening consumers. In addition, it provides county agents and industry professionals information on plants that should be recommended. The selection committee consists of an extension horticulturist, two county agents, a landscape contractor, a wholesale greenhouse grower, a wholesale woody ornamental producer, and two representatives from retail garden centers. Plants are usually promoted in the spring and fall of each year. Plants previously named as Louisiana Select recipients include `New Orleans Red' (Red Ruffle) coleus, mayhaw, `Henry's Garnet' virginia sweetspire, `Homestead Purple' perennial verbena, `Telstar' dianthus, bald cypress, `New Gold' lantana, `Confetti' lantana, `Trailing Purple' lantana, `Dallas Red' lantana, `Silver Mound' lantana, `Lady in Red' salvia, `New Wonder' scaevola, `Goldsturm' rudbeckia, and `Foxy' fox-glove. A theme (“Fall is for Planting Native Trees”) has also been promoted. Point of purchase signs promoting the Louisiana Select program and individual plants are made available to garden centers. Significant sales increases ranging from 300% to 2500% have been reported for seelcted plants with annual bedding plants and perennial flowers enjoying the greater sales volume increases.

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Donald J. Merhaut and Dennis Pittenger

A survey of wholesale nurseries in the United States was conducted in 1999, with 169 of the 806 nurseries surveyed responding from the state of California. The survey, consisting of 29 questions related to production practices, products, sales, and marketing, was sent to a random group of nurseries. Based on these results, over 50% of the new nursery businesses in California have been established within the last two decades. While most of the nurseries have computerized business practices, only 21% have implemented the use of computers or other automation in their production practices. Horticulturally, containerized plant production (80% of the industry) is still the primary method of growing and shipping plants in California, and most (90%) of these products are sold within the state. Nevada, Arizona, Oregon, Washington, and Texas are the primary destinations for plant material that is exported out of state. The factors that nursery owners feel influence sales the most include market demand, weather unpredictability, and water supply, while governmental and environmental regulations are perceived to have the least impact. The factors that influence product price include cost of production, market demand, and product uniqueness.

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Bridget Behe, Robert Nelson, Susan Barton, Charles Hall, Charles D. Safley, and Steven Turner

successfully completed as part of Regional Research Project S-103, “Technical Efficiencies in Horticulture Production and Marketing.” The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper

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Bridget K. Behe, Timothy A. Prince, and Harry K. Tayama

support provided by state and federal funds appropriated to the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State Univ. We greatly appreciate the financial support of this research by the Produce Marketing Association, Ohio Floriculture

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Bridget K. Behe, Timothy A. Prince, and Harry K. Tayama

support provided by state and federal funds appropriated to the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State Univ. We greatly appreciate the financial support of this research by the Produce Marketing Association, Ohio Floriculture

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Thomas L. Prince, Harry K. Tayama, and John R. Grabner Jr.

1 Postdoctoral Fellow. 2 Professor of Horticulture. 3 Associate Professor, Faculty of Marketing, College of Business, The Ohio State Univ., 1775 College Rd., Columbus, OH 43210. From a dissertation submitted by T.L.P. in partial fulfillment

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Robert F. Brzuszek and Richard L. Harkess

launched the Grow Native! program that provides industry-wide branding and tag materials for native plant species. Bench cards, native landscape brochures, industry and public education programs, marketing assistance for growers, and pot tags are made

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Toni A. Thomas and Manuel C. Palada

In the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) more than 400 plants are recorded as having been used for medicinal purposes. Traditional use of medicinal plants (locally known as “bush”) is based on Amerindian, African and European influences. Despite the predominance of “western medicine”, many Virgin Islanders still use medicinal plants for self-treatments, beverages and culinary purposes. Traditionally, medicinal plants were either collected growing wild or cultivated and often sold in marketplaces for local consumption. This method of marketing still exists, but new marketing outlets are developing. Selections of popular medicinal plants (imported and local) appear both fresh and packaged dry in supermarkets and specialty shops. Blended brews (i.e. “bush teas”) are available in restaurants, bakeries and delicatessens. Creatively packaged products are featured in stores and hotels catering to the tourist trade. Current expanding marketing trends target the great number of tourists visiting the USVI. Future plans with significant impact on marketing include the use of solar driers and establishment of a Fanners' Cooperative.

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Kathleen Kelley, Jeffrey Hyde, James Travis, and Robert Crassweller

critical that sensory performances of these characteristics be evaluated for each apple. This information helps growers make production and marketing decisions as breeders develop new cultivars, as lesser-known cultivars from abroad are imported, and as