Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 555 items for :

  • Cucumis melo x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Soon O. Park, Kevin M. Crosby, Rongfeng Huang, and T. Erik Mirkov

Male sterility is an important trait of melon in F1 hybrid seed production. Molecular markers linked to a male-sterile gene would be useful in transferring male sterility into fertile melon cultivars and breeding lines. However, markers linked to the ms-3 gene for male sterility present in melon have not been reported. Our objectives were to identify randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to the ms-3 gene controlling male sterility using bulked segregant analysis in an F2 population from the melon cross of line ms-3 (male-sterile) × `TAM Dulce' (male-fertile), convert the most tightly linked RAPD marker to the ms-3 gene into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker based on a specific forward and reverse 20-mer primer pair, and confirm the linkage of the RAPD and SCAR markers with the ms-3 gene in an F2 population from the cross of line ms-3 × `Mission' (male-fertile). A single recessive gene controlling male sterility was found in F2 individuals and confirmed in F3 families. Two RAPD markers that displayed an amplified DNA fragment in the male-sterile bulk were detected to be linked to the ms-3 gene in the F2 population from the cross of line ms-3 × `TAM Dulce'. RAPD marker OAM08.650 was closely linked to the ms-3 gene at 2.1 cM. SCAR marker SOAM08.644 was developed on the basis of the specific primer pair designed from the sequence of the RAPD marker OAM08.650. The linked RAPD and SCAR markers were confirmed in the F2 population from the cross of line ms-3 × `Mission' to be consistently linked to the ms-3 gene at 5.2 cM. These markers were also present in 22 heterozygous fertile F1 plants having the ms-3 gene. The RAPD and SCAR markers linked to the ms-3 gene identified, and confirmed here could be utilized for backcrossing of male sterility into elite melon cultivars and lines for use as parents for F1 hybrid seed production.

Free access

Hector G. Nunez-Palenius, Daniel J. Cantliffe, Harry J. Klee, and Don J. Huber

Pollen germination timing has a paramount role in fertilization of a flower. Rapid germination and outgrowth of a pollen tube that penetrates the stigma is required. Physical and biological factors can affect pollen germination timing. The objective of this study was to determine if ACC oxidase antisense gene expression could influence in vitro pollen germination and in vitro pollen tube length growth. A transgenic (ACC oxidase antisense) `Galia' male parental line had a reduced fruit set compared to its wild type. Likewise, embryo abortion and empty seeds after self-pollination in a `Galia' male parental line were observed. Wild type and transgenic `Galia' male parental line melon plants were grown in a greenhouse according to the practices of Rodriguez (2003). Male flowers were collected from these plants between 10 to 12 am; pollen was obtained by dipping the anther in germination medium (10.25% sucrose, 0.031% calcium nitrate, 0.015% boric acid, 0.0075% KNO3, and 0.016% MgSO4) at 25 °C and analyzed immediately, either for total percentage of germination after 5 minutes of incubation or to measure pollen tube growth rate every 5 minutes during 1 hour. Each flower provided an average of 250 pollen grains. Assays were conducted by using the “Hanging Drop Method” (Okay and Ayfer, 1994). Percentage of pollen germination in WT `Galia' male parental line was greater than the transgenic line. Likewise, in vitro pollen tube growth in wild type `Galia' melon was greater than pollen from the transgenic line. Possibly the ACC oxidase antisense gene expression in `Galia' male parental line may have had an influence on the reduced fruit set observed.

Free access

Carol Gonsalves, Baodi Xue, Marcela Yepes, Marc Fuchs, Kaishu Ling, Shigetou Namba, Paula Chee, Jerry L. Slightom, and Dennis Gonsalves

A single regeneration procedure using cotyledon explants effectively regenerated five commercially grown muskmelon cultivars. This regeneration scheme was used to facilitate gene transfers using either Agrobacterium tumefaciens (using `Burpee Hybrid' and `Hales Best Jumbo') or microprojectile bombardment (using `Topmark') methods. In both cases, the transferred genes were from the T-DNA region of the binary vector plasmid pGA482GG/cp cucumber mosaic virus-white leaf strain (CMV-WL), which contains genes that encode neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II), β-glucuronidase (GUS), and the CMV-WL coat protein (CP). Explants treated with pGA482GG/cpCMV-WL regenerated shoots on Murashige and Skoog medium containing 4.4 μm 6-benzylaminopurine (BA), kanamycin (Km) at 150 mg·liter-1 and carbenicillin (Cb) at 500 mg·liter-1. Our comparison of A. tumefaciens- and microprojectile-mediated gene transfer procedures shows that both methods effectively produce nearly the same percentage of transgenic plants. R0 plants were first tested for GUS or NPT II expression, then the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other tests were used to verify the transfer of the NPT II, GUS, and CMV-WL CP genes. This analysis showed that plants transformed by A. tumefaciens contained all three genes, although co-transferring the genes into bombarded plants was not always successful. R1 plants were challenge inoculated with CMV-FNY, a destructive strain of CMV found in New York. Resistance levels varied according to the different transformed genotypes. Somaclonal variation was observed in a significant number of R0 transgenic plants. Flow cytometry analysis of leaf tissue revealed that a significant number of transgenic plants were tetraploid or mixoploid, whereas the commercial nontransformed cultivars were diploid. In a study of young, germinated cotyledons, however, a mixture of diploid, tetraploid, and octoploid cells were found at the shoot regeneration sites.

Full access

Xuefei Ning, Xianlei Wang, Zhijie Yu, Simeng Lu, and Guan Li

. Morata, J. Pujol, M. Ramosonsins, S.E. Garciamas, J. 2015b Use of targeted SNP selection for an improved anchoring of the melon ( Cucumis melo L.) scaffold genome assembly BMC Genomics 16 4 29 Ashburner, M. Ball, C.A. Blake, J.A. Botstein, D. Butler, H

Full access

Juan Pablo Fernández-Trujillo, Gene E. Lester, Noelia Dos-Santos, Juan Antonio Martínez, Juan Esteva, John L. Jifon, and Plácido Varó

. Ribas, F. 2011 Determination of the uptake and translocation of nitrogen applied at different growth stages of a melon crop ( Cucumis melo L.) using N-15 isotope Sci. Hort. 130 541 550 Camacho, F. 2003 Técnicas de producción en cultivos protegidos. Vol

Free access

Paola Crinò, Chiara Lo Bianco, Youssef Rouphael, Giuseppe Colla, Francesco Saccardo, and Antonino Paratore

Melon ( Cucumis melo L.) is one of the most economically important and widely cultivated vegetable crops in the Mediterranean region. In Italy, 26,615 ha are annually cultivated ( ISTAT, 2005 ) with 23,157 ha (87%) in open-field and 3458 ha (13

Free access

Ana Carolina de Assis Dantas, Ioná Santos Araújo Holanda, Cristina Esteras, Glauber Henrique de Sousa Nunes, and Maria Belén Picó

, indicate that the Australian Cucumis picrocarpus is sister to C. melo , of which the wild progenitors are likely Cucumis trigonus and Cucumis callosus , which are both Asian. Melon may have been domesticated primarily due to the nutritional value of

Full access

Wenjing Guan, Xin Zhao, Danielle D. Treadwell, Michael R. Alligood, Donald J. Huber, and Nicholas S. Dufault

://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=70 > Akashi, Y. Fukuda, N. Wako, T. Masuda, M. Kato, K. 2002 Genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships in east and south Asian melons, Cucumis melo L., based on the analysis of five isozymes Euphytica 125 385 396 Bachmann, J. 2002 Specialty

Free access

Javier Obando, Juan Pablo Fernández-Trujillo, Juan Antonio Martínez, Antonio Luis Alarcón, Iban Eduardo, Pere Arús, and Antonio José Monforte

includes maximum 5% or 5% to 10% area with defects, respectively, and noncommercial fruit have no sound peduncle area or >10% area with defects. Fig. 1. ( Top ) Fruit from near-isogenic lines (NILs) of Cucumis melo at harvest showing different

Free access

Jun Matsumoto, Hideyuki Goto, Yasutaka Kano, Akira Kikuchi, Hideaki Ueda, and Yuta Nakatsubo

activity of α-galactosidases and acid invertase during muskmelon ( Cucumis melo L.) fruit development J. Plant Physiol. 151 41 50 Gao, Z. Petreikov, M. Zamski, E. Schaffer, A.A. 1999 Carbohydrate metabolism during early fruit development of sweet melon