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Jeff L. Sibley, John M. Ruter, and D. Joseph Eakes

The objective of this study was to determine differences in the bulk anthocyanin content of bark tissue of container-grown red maple (Acer rubrum L. and Acer ×freemanii E. Murray) at two Georgia locations with different environmental conditions. Rooted cuttings and tissue-cultured plantlets of eight cultivars were grown in either Blairsville or Tifton, Ga. [U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) Hardiness Zones 6b and 8a; American Horticultural Society (AHS) Heat Zones 5 and 8, respectively], from June 1995 until Dec. 1996. Bark tissue from twigs of trees grown in Blairsville was visually redder and contained more total anthocyanin than did that of trees grown in Tifton. Levels of total anthocyanins were higher (P = 0.0007) at Blairsville (0.087 mg·g-1, N = 48) than at Tifton (0.068 mg·g-1, N = 47). At both locations the levels were highest in `Landsburg' (`Firedance'™), followed by `Franksred' (`Red Sunset'™) and `October Glory'. This is the first report to quantify anthocyanin differences in bark tissue of container-grown trees. Cooler nights in Blairsville might have contributed to increased coloration by reducing respiratory losses, thus leaving more carbohydrates available for pigment production.

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Rose A. Ogutu, Kimberly A. Williams, and Gary M. Pierzynski

container production in the greenhouse and nursery industries. Properties imparted by these materials are inherited from the parent clay or source, particle size distribution, and calcining process. High calcining temperatures result in expansion of the

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J. Roger Harris, Alex X. Niemiera, Robert D. Wright, and Charles H. Parkerson

Three experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using Biobarrier, a landscape fabric with trifluralin herbicide-impregnated nodules, of various sizes to prevent root escape of trees from the drainage holes of 56-liter containers in below-ground pot-in-pot (P&P) and above-ground Keeper Upper (KU) nursery production systems. In addition, side holes or slits were cut in some container walls to test the effect of Biobarrier on the prevention of circling roots. In Expt. 1 (P&P), Betula nigra L. `Heritage' (river birch) trees with no Biobarrier had root ratings for roots escaped through drainage holes that indicated a 5-fold increase in numbers of roots than for treatments containing Biobarrier. All Biobarrier treatments reduced root escape and resulted in commercially acceptable control. In Expt. 2 (KU), control and the Biobarrier treatment river birch trees (30 nodules) had commercially unacceptable root escape. In Expt. 3 (P&P), control and 10-nodule treatment Prunus × yedoensis Matsum. (Yoshino cherry) trees had commercially unacceptable root escape, but treatments containing 20 and 40 nodules resulted in commercially acceptable control. Biobarrier did not limit shoot growth in any of the experiments. The results of these experiments indicate that Biobarrier did not prevent circling roots, but sheets containing at least 8 or 20 nodules of trifluralin acceptably prevented root escape from drainage holes in the pot-in-pot production of 56-liter container river birch trees and Yoshino cherry trees, respectively.

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Manjot Kaur Sidhu, Roberto G. Lopez, Sushila Chaudhari, and Debalina Saha

was within greenhouses in comparison with field plantings and nursery container production. Several difficult-to-control weeds, including higher plants [broadleaves (Dicotyledoneae), grasses (Poaceae), and sedges (Cyperaceae)] as well as primitive

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H.M. Mathers, S.B. Lowe, C. Scagel, D.K. Struve, and L.T. Case

commercial production was in containers ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2004 ). Container production has several advantages over traditional in-ground (field) production ( Gilman and Beeson, 1996 ; Harris and Gilman, 1991 ), and the packaged look of the

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Anthony S. Aiello and William R. Graves

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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Larry J. Kuhns, Tracey Harpster, and Clyde Elmore

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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Mark H. Brand

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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James E. Klett, David Hillock, and David Staats

144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 547–556) Container Production–Woody Ornamentals/Landscape

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Andrew A. Waber and Michael R. Evans

145 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 535–546) Substrates for Container Production–Floriculture/Woody Ornamentals