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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Theodore A. Mackey, Kim E. Hummer, and Robert R. Martin

opened in summer. This phenomenon has been reported previously, particularly in V. angustifolium germplasm associated with the University of Minnesota blueberry breeding program ( Fear, 1983 ; Fear et al., 1985 ; Luby, 1991 ). As was the case with the

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Stephen J. Stringer, Arlen D. Draper, Donna Marshall-Shaw, Blair J. Sampson, and John J. Adamczyk Jr.

Southern Horticulture Laboratory in Poplarville, MS, from a cross of T142 × ‘Powderblue’. T142 resulted from a cross of ‘Tifblue’ × ‘Woodard’ and was selected in the early 1960s at Tifton, GA in the University of GA blueberry breeding and genetics research

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt

this germplasm contributes to the development of a new breeding line or cultivar. Literature Cited Brevis, P.A. Bassil, N.V. Ballington, J.R. Hancock, J.F. 2008 Impact of wide hybridization on highbush blueberry breeding J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 133 427

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Chad E. Finn, Bernadine C. Strik, Theodore A. Mackey, Patrick A. Jones, Nahla V. Bassil, and Robert R. Martin

the University of Minnesota blueberry breeding program ( Fear, 1983 ; Fear et al., 1985 ; Luby, 1991 ). Similar to early work involving primocane fruiting raspberries, this trait was seen as a potential approach to avoiding winter injury in northern

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Gerardo H. Nunez, Hilda Patricia Rodríguez-Armenta, Rebecca L. Darnell, and James W. Olmstead

pseudo-backcross family ( Table 1 ) were transplanted to bench-top rhizotrons filled with peat. After 69 d of growth, seedlings were harvested as above. Since the pseudo-backcross family was of interest to the blueberry breeding program, individuals were

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Hirotoshi Tsuda, Hisato Kunitake, Mai Yamasaki, Haruki Komatsu, and Katsunori Yoshioka

cultivated highbush blueberry HortScience 46 563 566 Lyrene, P.M. Ballington, J.R. 1986 Wide hybridization in Vaccinium HortScience 21 52 57 Lyrene, P.M. Olmstead, J.W. 2012 The use of inter-sectional hybrids in blueberry breeding Intl. J. Fruit Sci. 12 269

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R. Karina Gallardo, Qi Zhang, Michael Dossett, James J. Polashock, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, Nicholi Vorsa, Patrick P. Edger, Hamid Ashrafi, Ebrahiem Babiker, Chad E. Finn, and Massimo Iorizzo

and accelerate the development of improved cultivars. This study identifies breeding trait priorities in the U.S. and Canadian highbush blueberry industries. The primary focus of blueberry breeding programs in the United States is to improve two types

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Steven A. Sargent, Adrian D. Berry, Jeffrey G. Williamson, and James W. Olmstead

) were followed at both locations for both seasons ( Williamson et al., 2006 ). Since the University of Florida blueberry breeding program focuses on plants adapted to low-chill production areas, several southern highbush blueberry cultivars and

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt and Bryan T. Vinyard

tolerance in blueberry ( Vaccinium section Cyanococcus ) Theor. Appl. Genet. 100 690 696 Brevis, P.A. Bassil, N.V. Ballington, J.R. Hancock, J.F. 2008 Impact of wide hybridization on highbush blueberry breeding J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 133 427 437

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John R. Clark, Alejandra Salgado, Arlen Draper, Chad E. Finn, Paul Sandefur, and Peter Boches

‘Norman’ is the third cultivar released from the University of Arkansas blueberry breeding program, which began in the late 1970s and has involved cooperative efforts with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Previous cultivars released from