Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 605 items for :

  • "Fragaria × ananassa" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Full access

Fatemeh Haddadi, Maheran Abd Aziz, Hossein Kamaladini, and Seyed Ali Ravanfar

strawberry ( Fragaria ananassa Duch.) cultivar Chandler Crop Sci. Biotechnol. 11 100 107 Husaini, A.M. Srivastava, D.K. 2006 Plant regeneration and Agrobacterium -mediated gene transfer studies in strawberry tissues ( Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) Asian J

Free access

Max E. Austin

Free access

A. Raymond Miller, Joseph C. Scheereus, Patricia S. Erb, and Craig K. Chandler

A tissue culture protocol was developed that increased the germination percentage and decreased the lag time to germination for strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) achenes. This technique involved cutting surface-sterilized achenes across the embryo axis then placing the shoot apex/radicle-containing sections on semisolid Murashige and Skoog medium lacking hormones. Cut achenes began germinating 5 days after culture and achieved maximum germination (97% to 100%) in less than 2 weeks, compared to whole achenes, which began to germinate 7 to 10 days after sowing and required more than 7 weeks for maximum germination (<50%). Enhanced germination of cut achenes was a general phenomenon since achenes from 231 hybrid crosses responded similarly. Following placement on culture medium, cut achenes could be stored up to 8 weeks at 4C then removed to 27C, where germination and seedling development occurred at percentages and rates comparable to freshly cut achenes. Achenes did not require stratification before cutting to exhibit increased germination. Nearly 100% of the achenes from freshly harvested red-ripe, pink and white strawberries germinated after cutting and culture, although cut achenes from white and pink berries germinated more slowly than those from red-ripe berries. Achenes from green berries, whether whole or cut, did not germinate. This method of “embryo rescue” could be used to generate more seedlings from poorly germinating hybrid crosses, would considerably decrease the time from sowing to seedling production compared to traditional means, and would produce seedlings of uniform age for subsequent field evaluation.

Free access

Takashi Ikeda, Keisuke Yamazaki, Hiroshi Kumakura, and Hiroshi Hamamoto

( Fragaria × ananassa Duch. cv. Sachinoka) runner plants with four leaves were used. In the 2003 experiment, they were stored in a growth cabinet in total darkness at 15 °C for 15 d (total darkness treatment) and were then transplanted into the culture

Free access

Emma Bradford, James F. Hancock, and Ryan M. Warner

During Summer 2007, after spring flowering had ceased, field-grown plants with developing runner plants of Fragaria × ananassa ‘Tribute’ [bred in Maryland and released 1981 ( Draper et al., 1981 )] and ‘Honeoye’ [bred in New York and released 1979

Free access

Freddy Mora, Cristóbal M. Concha, and Carlos R. Figueroa

phenotypes Heredity 83 733 741 Atkinson, C.J. Dodds, P.A.A. Ford, Y.Y. Le Mière, J. Taylor, J.M. Blake, P.S. Paul, N. 2006 Effects of cultivar, fruit number and reflected photosynthetically active radiation on Fragaria × ananassa productivity and fruit

Free access

David Jesús Gil-Ariza, Iraida Amaya, José Manuel López-Aranda, José Federico Sánchez-Sevilla, Miguel Ángel Botella, and Victoriano Valpuesta

of cultivars, although recent cultivars with Californian pedigree were in excess as a result of our objective of assessing the power of these SSR markers for cultivar identification. Table 1. List of Fragaria × ananassa germplasm, organized

Free access

Hugh A. Daubeny, P.P. Moore, T.M. Sjulin, F.J. Lawrence, and B.H. Barritt

Full access

Misaki Ishibashi, Takeshi Nabe, Yoko Nitta, and Yuichi Uno

. Following whole-genome sequencing of strawberry species Fragaria vesca ( Shulaev et al., 2011 ) and Fragaria × ananassa ( Hirakawa et al., 2014 ), post-genome research is now under way. One of the most important post-genome approaches, transcriptome

Free access

María Teresa Ariza, Carmen Soria, Juan Jesús Medina-Mínguez, and Elsa Martínez-Ferri

Misshapen fruit reduce the returns of most commercial strawberry cultivars ( Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) grown under conventional cropping practices. Huelva, Spain, is the main strawberry growing area in Europe and the second worldwide after the