Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 546 items for :

  • "Cucumis melo" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Anne Frary, Hasan Özgür Şığva, Ayfer Tan, Tuncer Taşkın, Abdullah İnal, Sevgi Mutlu, Mehmet Haytaoğlu, and Sami Doğanlar

Genebank at the Aegean Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Menemen, Izmir, Turkey. The seed bank contains 571 accessions of Cucumis melo, many of which have been collected and submitted by farmers from throughout the country ( Sari et al., 2008 ). Ex

Free access

Soon O. Park, Hye Y. Hwang, and Kevin M. Crosby

of some important plant species Plant Mol. Biol. Rpt. 9 211 215 Baudracco-Arnas, S. Pitrat, M. 1996 A genetic map of melon ( Cucumis melo L.) with RFLP, RAPD, isozyme, disease resistance and morphological

Open access

Sat Pal Sharma, Daniel I. Leskovar, Kevin M. Crosby, and A.M.H. Ibrahim

, cantaloupes ( Cucumis melo L., reticulatus group), and honey dews ( Cucumis melo L., inodorus group) are excellent sources of carotenoids ( Pitrat, 2016 ). Crosby et al. (2007) reported that melon cultivars TAM Uvalde and Mission had more than 36 μg·g −1

Free access

Soon O. Park* and Kevin M. Crosby

Mature fruit size and shape are important traits of most melon types. Our objective was to identify RAPD markers associated with major QTL affecting fruit weight, length, diameter and shape by means of bulked segregant analysis in an F2 population from the ananas melon cross of Deltex (larger fruit size) × TGR1551 (smaller fruit size). Clear separations for fruit weight, length, diameter, and shape between Deltex and TGR1551 were observed. Continuous distributions for fruit weight, length, diameter and shape were found in the F2 population indicating quantitative inheritance for the fruit traits. Significant positive correlations were detected between fruit weight and shape traits (r = 0.73 to 0.80). A significant positive correlation was observed between fruit weight and glucose (r = 0.35) or fructose (r = 0.25), whereas no correlation was noted between fruit weight and sucrose or total soluble solids. Two small and large bulks for fruit weight and shape were developed from F2 plants. A total of 240 primers were used to simultaneously screen between the small and large bulks, and between Deltex and TGR1551. Twenty-six RAPD markers were polymorphic for the small and large bulks. Ten markers were found to be significantly and consistently associated with fruit size and shape traits on the basis of simple linear regression. Of the 10 markers associated, four displayed an amplified DNA fragment in the small bulk, while six showed an amplified DNA fragment in the large bulk. The associated marker OJ07.350 explained 15% to 27% of the phenotypic variation for the fruit traits. These markers associated with QTL for melon fruit size and shape are expected to be useful in melon breeding programs for modifying fruit size.

Free access

Hector Nunez-Palenius*, Daniel Cantliffe, Harry Klee, and Donald Huber

`Galia' is a high-quality muskmelon cultivar that is grown in green-houses or tunnels to maximize fruit yield and to help improve fruit quality. Maximum fruit quality and flavor are achieved when `Galia' are harvested at maturity. This however leads to reduced firmness and short shelf life. In vitro regeneration and transformation of `Galia' melon is a strategy that can be used to increase fruit shelf life. Melon cotyledons were transformed with the ACC oxidase gene in antisense orientation according to the protocol described by Nunez-Palenius et al. (2001, 2003). Experiments were conducted to compare fruit quality parameters between transgenic (TT) and wild type (WT) fruits from plants grown in greenhouse conditions. The melon plants were grown using commercial growing practices that included pruning and training to one vertical stem and the use of soilless media and drip fertigation. Wild type fruits were harvested at 37, 42, and 50 days after pollination (DAP), whereas transgenic fruits were harvested at 42, 50, and 56 DAP. TT fruits were harvested with that delaying period since their ripening process was slower than WT. Thirteen preharvest parameters were evaluated in transgenic and wild type fruits. Wild type and transgenic weight, lenght, width, soluble solids, tritatable acidity, pH, firmness, flesh thickness, seed cavity size and seed number parameters were not significantly different. Ethylene production and ACC oxidase from 42 DAP wild type fruits were greater than from transgenic fruits. Transgenic (ACC oxidase) galia melon fruits had a delayed fruit ripening process compared with wild type fruits.

Free access

V. V. Meglic, T. F. Horejsi, J. E. Staub, and J. D. McCreight

The genetic diversity of 400 U.S. melon germplasm plant introductions was assessed using 35 enzyme systems. Polymorphisms were observed at 24 putative loci (Ac, Acp1, Acp4, Ak2, Ak3. Ak4, Fdp1, Fdp2, Fdp4, Gpi, Idh, Mdh2, Mdh4, Mdh5, Mdhb, Mpi1, Mpi2, Pgd1, Pgd2, Pgm, Pep-g1, Pep-1a, Pep-pap, Skdh) representing 17 different enzymes. Sixteen loci demonstrated simple Mendelian inheritance. Multivariate analyses aided in reduction of data using 16 loci and linkage relationships were observed among the plant introductions. Two of 16 loci (Pgd1 and Acp1) segregated independently. Fourteen loci were assigned into three linkage groups (A-C): A Fdp1, Fdp2, Acp4, Skdh; B Mdh2, Mdh4, Mdh5, Mdh6, Pep-g1, Pgm; C Mpi2, Ac, Idh.

Free access

Samuel Mendlinger and Dov Pasternak

The increasing salinity of both irrigated lands as well as irrigation water in many parts of the world have emphasized the importance of having appropriate breeding strategies for developing salt tolerant cultivars. In a program to breed for salt tolerance (high yield and good quality at 5,000 ppm salinity) in melons, several breeding strategies were tried. The only systems that succeeded was using combining abilities in a hybrid program. We found that salinity did not effect the number of fruit or fruit quality but only fruit weight. Fruit weight of hybrids grown in fresh water was controlled by dominant genes (h2=0.09) whereas the same hybrids grown under salinity had fruit weight control by additive genes (h2=0.54) Therefore, we were capable of breeding tolerant hybrids from non-tolerant parents.

Free access

Samuel Mendlinger and Dov Pasternak

The increasing salinity of both irrigated lands as well as irrigation water in many parts of the world have emphasized the importance of having appropriate breeding strategies for developing salt tolerant cultivars. In a program to breed for salt tolerance (high yield and good quality at 5,000 ppm salinity) in melons, several breeding strategies were tried. The only systems that succeeded was using combining abilities in a hybrid program. We found that salinity did not effect the number of fruit or fruit quality but only fruit weight. Fruit weight of hybrids grown in fresh water was controlled by dominant genes (h2=0.09) whereas the same hybrids grown under salinity had fruit weight control by additive genes (h2=0.54) Therefore, we were capable of breeding tolerant hybrids from non-tolerant parents.

Free access

Yasutaka Kano

To investigate the relationship between cell size and sugar accumulation, fruit of the melon was heated during the early stage of the growing period. The minimum air temperature in the heating apparatus was ≈10 °C higher than the ambient air temperature, and the weight of the heated fruit was greater than that of the control fruit. The number of rectangular parallelepiped (7-mm-long sample serially collected beginning at one end of the 10-mm-wide strip removed from the 10-mm-thick disk at the maximum transverse diameter of the fruit to the opposite end) with cells larger than 200 μm in the heated fruit at 17 days after anthesis (DAA, the end of heating treatment) was much larger that of the control fruit. The mean cell size in the heated fruit at 17 DAA was larger than that of the control fruit. Mean sucrose content of the heated fruit on 40 DAA was larger than the level in the control fruit. Higher fruit temperatures in melons covered with heating apparatus results in the predominance of larger cells and increased accumulation of sucrose in the fruit.

Free access

P. Healey, T.J Ng, and F.A. Hammerschlag

Mesophyll cells are desirable targets for studying responses to pathogens or pathogen-induced toxins. Based on host-pathogen or host-toxin interaction studies at the cellular level it can be determined whether a toxin can be used as a selective agent. Suspension cells are suitable selection units for in vitro selection of potentially useful somaclonal variants. Protocols for the isolation of muskmelon mesophyll and suspension cells were developed in order to study the effects of roridin E, a toxin produced by Myrothecium roridum, on leaf spot tolerant and sensitive muskmelon cultivars. Viable mesophyll cells were obtained by exposing leaf tissue to 1% cellulysin and 5% macerase in B5 medium with 0.4M sucrose for one hour. Viable suspension cells were maintained a medium consisting of MS salts, 3% sucrose, 3 (μM thiamine·HCl, 555 μM myo-Inositol, 28 μM kinetin and 9 μM IAA. Fluorescein diacetate was used to determine viability over time. Membrane stability was monitored by measuring changes in the fluorescence of cells stained with Merocyanine 540 (MC 540), an optical probe for changes in transmembrane electrical potential (PD).