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Jacob Mashilo, Hussein Shimelis, Alfred Odindo, and Beyene Amelework

fluorescently labeled and separated by capillary electrophoresis on an ABI 3130 automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems, Johannesburg, South Africa). Table 2. Description of the simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers used for bottle gourd genetic diversity

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David Jesús Gil-Ariza, Iraida Amaya, José Manuel López-Aranda, José Federico Sánchez-Sevilla, Miguel Ángel Botella, and Victoriano Valpuesta

of difficulty in the analysis of polyploid species ( Röder et al., 1998 ). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in the genus Fragaria L. have been developed from diploid species ( Bassil et al., 2006a ; Cipriani and Testolin, 2004 ; Hadonou et al

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Weisheng Liu, Dongcheng Liu, Aimin Zhang, Chenjing Feng, Jianmin Yang, Jaeho Yoon, and Shaohua Li

( Jones et al., 1997 ; Virk et al., 2000 ). Microsatellites or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with tandem repeats of a basic motif of <6 bp are the most polymorphic and hence are highly useful markers; however, their development is laborious and

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Jacob Mashilo, Hussein Shimelis, Alfred Odindo, and Beyene Amelework

as randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP), peroxidase gene-based polymorphism (POGP), high-frequency oligonucleotides (HFO), and simple sequence repeat

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Ying Li, Liyi Zhang, Zhen Zhang, Peihua Cong, and Zong-Ming Cheng

susceptible plants was mixed to form the resistance DNA pool or susceptible DNA pool, respectively. Screening of polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers. Eighty primer pairs ( Table 2 ) were chosen from the 140 primer pairs, which were used by Liebhard et

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Josh A. Honig, Vincenzo Averello, Stacy A. Bonos, and William A. Meyer

using recently described kentucky bluegrass SSR markers ( Honig et al., 2010 ). Materials and Methods Simple sequence repeat markers and genotyping The development of 88 kentucky bluegrass SSR markers was previously described by Honig et al. (2010

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R.L. Jarret, N. Bowen, S. Kresovich, and Z. Liu

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were isolated from a size-fractionated genomic DNA library of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.]. Screening of the library with five oligonucleotide probes, including; (GT)11, (AT)11, (CT)11, (GC)11, and (TAA)8, detected the occurrence of 142 positive colonies among ≈12,000 recombinants. Automated DNA sequencing revealed the presence of simple, compound, perfect, and imperfect SSRs. Five homologous PCR primer pairs were synthesized commercially and used to screen 30 sweetpotato clones for the occurrence of SSR polymorphisms. All primer pairs produced an amplification product of the expected size and detected polymorphisms among the genotypes examined. The potential for the use of SSRs as genetic markers for sweetpotato germplasm characterization is discussed.

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Amy K. Szewc-McFadden, Sharon Bliek, Christopher G. Alpha, Warren F. Lamboy, and James R. McFerson

Simple-sequence repeats (SSRs) are efficient and informative DNA markers with great potential for germplasm characterization. When used to characterize large arrays of accessions, such as the core subset of the USDA/ARS Malus collection, SSRs may be more effective than other approaches, such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). For example, SSRs can be PCR-amplified and fluorescence-based detected; they also appear to be abundantly disbursed throughout plant genomes and yield abundant polymorphisms in most taxa studied. We are conducting an extensive screening of a size-fractionated library of Malus ×domestica cv. Golden Delicious to identify and characterize selected SSR loci. We are applying genetic information revealed by SSR loci in combination with passport and horticultural data to better comprehend genetic identity and relatedness in Malus germplasm collections and help develop the Malus core subset. Ultimately, application of molecular marker data will permit improved conservation and use of genetic resources.

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R.L. Jarret, S. Kresovich, T. Holms, Janelle Evans, and Z. Liu

Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were isolated from a size-fractionated genomic DNA library of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L. cv. New Hampshire Midget). Screening of the library with five oligonucleotide probes, including (GT)11, (AT)11, (CT)11, (GC)11, and (TAA)8, detected the occurrence of 96 positive colonies among ≈8000 recombinants. Automated DNA sequencing revealed the presence of SSRs. PCR primer pairs homologous to the regions flanking the SSR loci were synthesized commercially and used to screen 56 watermelon genotypes for the occurrence of SSR polymorphisms. Amplification products were separated using nondenaturing PAGE. Eighty percent of the primer pairs produced amplification products of the expected size and detected polymorphisms among the genotypes examined. The use of SSRs for watermelon germplasm characterization is discussed.

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Tilin Fang, Yanqi Wu, Shiva Makaju, Todd Tribble, Dennis L. Martin, and Justin Q. Moss

bermudagrasses on the Oklahoma State University Baseball Field (OSUBF, Stillwater, OK) sod farm that were genotyped using simple sequence repeat markers. Eight additional clonal varieties [no. 33–40 ( Table 1 )] and the OSUBF no. 1 sample formed the second set of