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J. Farias-Larios, M. Orozco, S. Guzman, and J. Perez

This work was conducted for evaluate the influence of clear and black polyethylene mulches, used alone or combined with floating rowcover (FRC) and plastic perforated microtunnels, on insect populations, growth and yield of muskmelon. Treatments evaluated were 1) clear plastic + FRC, 2) polyethylene perforated microtunnel, 3) clear plastic + polyethylene not perforated microtunnel, 4) black plastic + FRC, 5) clear plastic, 6) black polyethylene, 7) clear plastic + oil, and 8) bare soil. Aphids and sweetpotato whitefly adults and nymphs were completely excluded by floating rowcovers while the plots covered. The export and national quality fruit yield was major in the mulched beds in relation to control. Clear polyethylene mulch + FRC increased number of fruit and export marketable fruit of cantaloupe (45.2% and 44.8%) with respect to black plastic + FRC, respectively. It is proposed that, under tropical conditions and under high insect stress, mulches combined with floating rowcovers should be selected for their effects on insects in addition to their effects on melon yield. Polyethylene microtunnels were found not economical for cantaloupe production in western Mexico.

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James D. McCreight, Hsing-Yeh Liu, and Thomas A. Turini

Cucurbit leaf crumple geminivirus (CuLCrV) is transmitted by sweet-potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) biotype B (SPWF-B) and occurs on cucurbits in Arizona, California, Texas, and Mexico. This virus is identical to Cucurbit leaf curl virus, and their symptoms are similar to Squash leaf curl virus on squash (Cucurbita sp.) and Melonleaf curl virus on melon (Cucumis melo L.). Melon has been reported to be either susceptible to CuLCrV, or to have the ability to recover from infection. Twenty-three melon cultigens were inoculated with CuLCrV in greenhouse tests using SPWF-B. Eighteen of the cultigens tested were highly susceptible to CuLCrV (≥60% infected plants) and generally exhibited pronounced CuLCrV symptoms: `Amarillo', `Edisto 47', `Esteem', `Fuyu 3', `Impac', `Moscatel Grande', `Negro', `Perlita', PI 234607, PI 236355, PI 414723, `PMR 5', `Seminole', `Sol Dorado', `Sol Real', `Top Mark', `Vedrantais', and WMR 29. Five cultigens were resistant to CuLCrV (<40% infected plants that exhibited restricted, mild symptoms): MR-1, PI 124111, PI 124112, PI 179901, and PI 313970. Symptoms abated with time in both groups although infected plants remained positive for the virus. Ten of the cultigens (`Edisto 47', `Fuyu 3', `Impac', MR-1, PI 124112, PI 313970, PI 414723, `PMR 5', `Top Mark', and WMR 29) were included in field tests in 2003 and 2004 that were naturally infected with CuLCrV. With the exception of PI 414723, the greenhouse and field data were consistent for reaction to CuLCrV.

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Raymond A. Cloyd

Pesticides, in this case, insecticides and miticides, are the primary means of controlling arthropod (insect and mite) pests encountered in greenhouse production systems, including greenhouse whitefly ( Trialeurodes vaporariorum ), sweetpotato

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James D. McCreight, Hsing-Yeh Liu, and Thomas A. Turini

Sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), adversely affects yield and quality of a wide range of vegetable and agronomic crops worldwide directly through feeding damage or indirectly as virus vectors ( Henneberry et al., 1998 ). It is

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Prabin Tamang, Kaori Ando, William M. Wintermantel, and James D. McCreight

season melon production (for October–December harvest) in Arizona and the southern inland portions of California (Imperial Valley, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley) have been devastated by the combination of sweetpotato whitefly ( Bemisia tabaci

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Cecilia E. McGregor, Douglas W. Miano, Don R. LaBonte, Mary Hoy, Chris A. Clark, and Guilherme J.M. Rosa

infection can lead to significant yield losses in sweetpotato, affecting number of roots and total weight ( Gutierrez et al., 2003 ). This phloem-limited crinivirus (Closteroviridae) is transmitted by whiteflies ( Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes abutilonea

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Kelechi Ogbuji, Gloria S. McCutcheon, Alvin M. Simmons, Maurice E. Snook, Howard F. Harrison, and Amnon Levi

the sweetpotato whitefly, B. tabaci ( Simmons and Levi, 2002 ), the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urtichae Koch ( Lopez et al., 2005 ), and aphids (Simmons, unpublished data). These sources of germplasm should be useful for incorporating

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Yuanfu Ji, John W. Scott, and David J. Schuster

( Polston and Anderson, 1997 ). Disease symptoms in tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum , formerly Lycopersicon esculentum ) include leaf curling and yellowing and plant stunting. TYLCV is transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn.), also

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diminished surface shear strength. Whiteflies Prefer Cucumber Seedlings Grown under Metal-halide Lamps Shibuya et al. (p. 873) evaluated the preference of adult sweetpotato whiteflies (SPWF) to cucumber seedlings grown under fluorescent lamps (FL) or metal

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rootstocks. LONGEVITY OF VIRUS-TESTED SWEETPOTATO IN PRODUCTION FIELDS Sweetpotato growers in the U.S. now use plant stock originating from virus-tested sweetpotato to improve yield and quality. Virus-tested plants are those that appear free of known viruses