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Jun Yuan, Liyuan Huang, Naifu Zhou, Hui Wang, and Genhua Niu

the tree trunks. The collections from each tree were pooled and then quartered for a sample of up to 1 kg. Rhizosphere soil samples were taken by collecting the soil adherent to nonwoody feeder roots. The pH of the soil samples was 3.6–4.9. At the same

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J.-L. Arsenault, S. Poulcur, C. Messier, and R. Guay

114 WORKSHOP 18 Advanced Root and Rhizosphere Analysis Systems

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Gary W. Stutte and Elizabeth C. Stryjewski

114 WORKSHOP 18 Advanced Root and Rhizosphere Analysis Systems

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James L. Green, R.G. Linderman, B. Blackburn, and K.A. Smith

114 WORKSHOP 18 Advanced Root and Rhizosphere Analysis Systems

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D. Michael Glenn

114 WORKSHOP 18 Advanced Root and Rhizosphere Analysis Systems

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Cécile Bertin, Andy F. Senesac, Frank S. Rossi, Antonio DiTommaso, and Leslie A. Weston

. Currently, the dynamics of allelochemical production and release into the soil rhizosphere are not well understood. However, we have observed that the seedlings of chewing's fescue, cultivar Intrigue, produce up to 3-fold higher concentrations of the

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Eva Bacaicoa and Jose María García-Mina

development of subapical swelling with abundant root hairs, transfer cells, the increase of Fe 3+ enzymatic reduction at the root surface, the acidification of the rhizosphere, the increase in Fe 2+ transporters, and the release of organic molecules with

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Ildikó Hernádi, Zita Sasvári, Jana Albrechtová, Miroslav Vosátka, and Katalin Posta

) improved growth and nutritional quality of greenhouse-grown lettuce J. Agr. Food Chem. 59 5504 5515 Cheng, W. 2008 Rhizosphere priming effect: Its functional relationships with microbial turnover, evapotranspiration, and C-N budgets Soil Biol. Biochem. 41

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Miguel Urrestarazu, Juan E. Alvaro, Soraya Moreno, and Gilda Carrasco

and bean production was increased after the remediation of Fe deficiency in the crops by either Fe-EDTA or Fe o,o -EDDHA chelate alleviates Fe deficiency by increasing the amount of Fe in the rhizosphere and its supply to the leaves and petioles

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Lauren M. Garcia Chance, Joseph P. Albano, Cindy M. Lee, Staci M. Wolfe, and Sarah A. White

; Wortman, 2015 ). Furthermore, some plant species directly influence their growing conditions through root-induced pH changes. These changes of pH in the rhizosphere are a long-documented chemical interaction, but they mostly result from root