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Esendugue Greg Fonsah, Gerard Krewer, Kerry Harrison, and Michael Bruorton

concomitantly. Numerous publications were consulted to obtain historical information on productivity, marketing, price, and overall outlook of southern highbush blueberries ( Abbe and Messer, 2002 ; Pollack and Perez, 2003 ). The objective of this research was

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Lisa W. DeVetter, David Granatstein, Elizabeth Kirby, and Michael Brady

Global production of highbush blueberry has expanded due to increased consumption, which has been largely fueled by successful marketing campaigns that advertise the multiple health benefits of eating blueberries ( Brazelton and Strik, 2007 ; Moore

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Donald H. Turner and Robin G. Brumfield

The development of New Zealand's economy was based largely on exports to England. With the formation of the EEC, New Zealand was forced to find other markets and concentrate on a wider variety of export commodities. Marketing boards for specific products with monopoly power have been at the center of agricultural and horticultural exports in New Zealand. New Zealand has concentrated on developing new varieties, premium quality, research on postharvest handling, branding, and other marketing procedures to compete in the world market and give producers a good return.

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Andrew Jeffers, Marco Palma, William E. Klingeman, Charles Hall, David Buckley, and Dean Kopsell

.L. Schlarbaum, S.E. Kormanik, P.P. 2000 Visual grading and quality of 1+0 Northern Red Oak seedlings Southern J. Appl. For. 14 93 97 Curry, J. 1996 Understanding conjoint analysis in 15 minutes Sawtooth Software, Res. Paper Ser. Quirk's Marketing Research Review

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Roland Roberts, David Bender, and Samuel Field

Extension-research teamwork supports Texas High Plains onion grower-shippers in transition from unprofitable labor intensive marketing and culture to profitable mechanical systems that are less stressful to workers. System comparisons include machine harvest vs. lifting and hand clipping; stationary seed grading and bagging vs. mobile field grading and bagging; transplant vs. fall seeding, spring seeding and dry set production. Old marketing systems cost growers $4.30/50-lb. sack, and the innovative system costs $2.59 to $3.00/sack. Old transplant systems average $450 to $500/acre and direct seeding costs $200/acre. Net increase in return to grower management from adoption of new systems range from $1,300 to $1,700. Extension and research conduct economic analysis, cultivar performance trials, seeding technique studies and on-farm demonstrations.

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Melvin Garber, Kane Bondari, and Gary Wade

A survey of landscape installers was conducted to help determine how university personnel and industry groups could better meet the needs of the landscape industry. The top four opportunities by which university personnel could assist landscape installers were to: 1) provide a hot-line for immediate professional advice (21%); 2) provide more in-house training (21%); 3) facilitate testing and introduction of new products (16%); and 4) provide lists of available publications and research findings (14%). Landscape installers also identified the most valuable information sources regarding types of plants available and plant installation. The implications of the survey results for developing education and marketing plans to serve the landscape installation industry are discussed.

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Wayne A. Mackay, Steve George, Tim Davis, Mike Arnold, Dan Lineberger, Jerry Parsons, and Larry Stein

The Coordinated Educational Marketing Assistance Program (CEMAP) is one of the oldest marketing assistance programs for ornamentals in the United States. The goal of this program is to identify outstanding plants for Texas and to provide support for the nursery industry, thereby making plants with superior performance available to the people of Texas. The CEMAP program is a cooperative effort between the Texas nursery industry and Texas A&M Univ. The CEMAP Executive Board has eight individuals representing extension, research, and teaching plus two administrative liasions and the Industry Advisory Board has ≈50 members from all segments of the ornamentals industry in Texas. Funding for the CEMAP program comes from direct industry support and from the public through the sale of plant tags or other promotional materials which bear the Texas Superstars logo. The logo is trademarked and licensed to printing companies who handle the administration of royalties to the program. The Executive Board makes the final decision about which plants are designated Texas Superstars. Promotional support for the plants is provided by CEMAP through point of purchase materials and publicity through print, radio, and television. In addition, the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association in cooperation with the Texas Department of Agriculture are conducting a publicity campaign to inform the public about Texas Superstars.

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Elaine M. Grassbaugh, Mark A. Bennett, Mark Schmittgen, and Brad Bergefurd

Specialty vegetables are defined as crops that are different in color, size, shape or nutrient content for that particular crop, those not normally grown in a specific area, or crops grown out of season. Knowing the clientele and what they demand is the first step in successfully marketing these less common crops. Due to market demand, “uncommon” crops are more frequently requested by produce buyers and the public. What is in demand one year may not be marketable the next. Our attempts to produce >25 specialty crops under Ohio growing conditions over the past 3 years resulted in successes and failures. Regardless of the outcome, our findings were important to vegetable growers who are interested in producing these crops. Crops tested from 1994 to 1996 included globe artichokes, luffa gourds, chili peppers, habanero peppers, okra, tomatillos, baby corn, and several specialty tomato varieties. Crops produced successfully in Ohio were marketed through several farm markets, food terminals, and produce brokers. A summary of cultural practices, production tips, and marketing opportunities on these less common vegetable crops based on our research in Ohio will be presented.

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Bridget K. Behe

Firms have limited resources that cannot be allocated efficiently to the market as a whole, but can be targeted to selected customer groups. Market segmentation is the process of dividing a market into distinct customer components. Selected products and services that best meet the needs of a selected customer group are targeted to that particular segment in a marketing strategy. Market segmentation and product-targeting concepts help management efficiently allocate scarce resources as part of a comprehensive strategy to expand revenues and profits.

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Susan S. Barton and Bridget K. Behe

’ tastes engendering desire for the product), informative (provides information to an imperfect market), or complementary (convinces consumers that products fit their preferences). In fact, a 2012 study based on data from the 2008 Trade Flows and Marketing