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Yongjun Yue and John M. Ruter

used as ornamental plants as a result of their heat and drought tolerance, and their attraction of pollinators ( Quinn and Klym, 2009 ). A new interspecific hybrid with reduced fertility, which carries the two species’ desired ornamental traits, would

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Ming Cai, Ke Wang, Le Luo, Hui-tang Pan, Qi-xiang Zhang, and Yu-yong Yang

. macrophylla . The present study describes the production of interspecific hybrids between H. macrophylla ‘Blue Diamond’, ‘Schneeball’, and H. arborescens ‘Annabelle’ via ovule culture. The offspring were identified as hybrids using morphological

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Cecil T. Pounders and Hamidou F. Sakhanokho

selections, ‘Hapa White’ (HMM10-008), ‘Hapa Red’ (HMM10-001), and ‘Hapa Pink’ (HMM10-004), are interspecific hybrids resulting from crosses of H. mutabilis and H. moscheutos hybrids. The three clones were selected from a group of seedlings hybridized and

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Thomas G. Beckman, Philip A. Rollins, James Pitts, Dario J. Chavez, and Jose X. Chaparro

the creation and testing of plum, peach, and plum × peach interspecific hybrids. Early work demonstrated that FLA 1-1, a putative native North American plum hybrid, had potential for use on PTSL- and ARR-infested sites. FLA 1-1 was subsequently named

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Omar Carrillo-Mendoza, Wayne B. Sherman, and José X. Chaparro

differences in branching patterns among interspecific hybrids over two growing seasons and the index values calculated in two-year-old trees were good predictors of the branching observed in the third year. Furthermore, the index was more precise when three

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Luping Qu and J.F. Hancock

RAPD markers were used to determine the level of heterozygosity transmitted via 2n gametes from V. darrowi cv. Florida 4b (Fla 4B) to interspecific hybrids with tetraploid V. corymbosum cv. Bluecrop. The tetraploid hybrid US 75 was found to contain 70.6% of Fla 4B's heterozygosity, a value consistent with a first division restitution (FDR) mode of 2n gamete production. Crossovers during 2n gamete formation were evidenced by the absence of 16 dominant alleles of Fla 4B in US 75, and direct tests of segregation in a diploid population involving Fla 4B. RAPD markers that were present in both Fla 4B and US 75 were used to determine the mode of inheritance in a segregating population of US 75 × V. corymbosum cv. Bluetta. More than 30 homozygous pairs of alleles were located that segregated in a 5:1 ratio, indicating US 75 undergoes tetrasomic inheritance.

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James A. Schrader, Diana R. Cochran, Paul A. Domoto, and Gail R. Nonnecke

.D. 1980 The technology of wine making. 4th ed. AVI Publ., Westport, CT Atucha, A. Hedtcke, J. Workmaster, B.A. 2018 Evaluation of cold-climate interspecific hybrid wine grape cultivars for the upper midwest J. Amer. Pomol. Soc. 72 80 93 Atucha, A. van

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M.A. Canady, M.R. Stevens, and J.W. Scott

Nineteen interspecific hybrid breeding lines were tested for resistance to a TSWV isolate using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to check for presence of the virus after inoculation. These lines were all BC1F6 lines derived from L. esculentum crosses with seven L. chilense accessions. All of these lines had been selected for high tolerance/resistance to tomato mottle virus (ToMoV), a geminivirus [Scott et al., Bemisia 1995: Taxonomy, Biology, Damage Control and Management 30: 357–367 (1996)]. The initial TSWV screening indicated that eight of the 19 original lines had “possible” TSWV resistance. Seed from these selected eight lines were then planted and inoculated with TSWV ≈3 weeks after emergence. Three weeks later, ELISA results indicated that all plants from all lines were infected with TSWV. However, none of the plants from Y118 (derived from the LA 1938 cross) showed visual TSWV symptoms. The Y118-derived plants were allowed to grow for several months, and at no time developed significant visual symptoms of the virus. The consistent lack of TSWV symptoms prompted a second ELISA test on the Y118 plants, and the results indicated the plants were completely free of TSWV. Further tests were then initiated with F2 (L. esculentum × Y118) seed, and results indicate a single dominant gene is responsible for TSWV resistance. Data from this segregating population, including a molecular marker study which screened 800 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers, will be presented. Approximately two to five RAPD primers are possibly linked to TSWV resistance.

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Alan T. Whittemore and Alden M. Townsend

obtained, only two individuals have the AFLP profile expected for F 1 interspecific hybrids, that is, more than half of the markers characteristic of the pollen parent (nine of 15 and 17 of 28, both ≈60%). Of the other 74 progeny, 64 have no paternal

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Neil Anderson, Peter Ascher, Esther Gesick, Lee Klossner, Neal Eash, Vincent Fritz, James Hebel, Stephen Poppe, Judith Reith-Rozelle, Roger Wagner, Susan Jacobson, David Wildung, and Patricia Johnson

planted adjacent to the female parent. There were no other garden chrysanthemums within proximity for pollinators (bees) to use for pollen transfer. These interspecific hybrid seeds were donated to the University of Minnesota breeding program ( Anderson