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A-Young Lee, Sin-Ae Park, Young-Jin Moon, and Ki-Cheol Son

operating procedure for the HAs was developed previously by six experts in the field of horticultural therapy, horticultural science, and motion dynamics ( Park et al., 2014 ) ( Table 2 ). Table 2. Descriptions of horticultural activities performed by the

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Susan D. Schoneweis

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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L.L. Lockett, C.B. McKenney, and D.L. Auld

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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Sarah Lineberger and J.M. Zajicek

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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Greg L. Davis and Julie Schimelfenig

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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Eunhee Kim and Richard H. Mattson

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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Bridget Behe and Susan Barton

83 ORAL SESSION 16 (Abstr. 495–501) Human Issues: Horticultural Therapy

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Diane Relf and Sheri Dorn

Portions of this paper are from presentations given in Japan in 1994 at Osaka and Tokyo: “Planning and conducting horticultural therapy programs for different populations, “Japan Greenery Research and Development Center Horticulture Therapy Workshop

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Steven H. Davis and Mary S. De Riso

Since 1982, the American Horticultural Therapy Assn. (AHTA) has devoted a significant portion of its organizational energies to promoting the employment of people with disabilities in the horticultural industry. Since then, the AHTA has administered five federal grants, resulting in the employment of 2269 people with disabilities. This paper summarizes the data generated through these activities and presents program findings.

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Hye Ran Kwack and Paula Diane Relf

As the level of urbanization has increased, many people in Korea have begun to recognize the beneficial effects of plants in our immediate surroundings and involvement in horticultural activities. Today, an increasing number of Koreans attempt to improve the quality of life and enhance educational effectiveness through horticultural activities. Kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high schools have initiated garden-based programs. Some universities include courses focusing on horticulture applications to human well-being in their regular graduate programs or in their social education curricula. A few general hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, and rehabilitation centers have begun applying horticulture as a means of treatment. Most of the research articles in Korea on various aspects of human issues in horticulture have been published since the foundation of two academic societies, the Korean Horticultural Therapy Association and the Korean Society for Plants, People, and Environment. These articles are primarily focused on the areas of school gardening, healing gardens, and psychological or physiological effects of horticultural activities. For the future development of human issues in horticulture in Korea, several areas need to be enhanced including: interdisciplinary studies of horticulture and social education; development of different skills, techniques,and scales to validate the effects of horticultural therapy, healing gardens, and gardening as a teaching tool in public education; and an organization empowered to certify horticultural therapists.