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Erin Alvarez, Sloane M. Scheiber, and David R. Sandrock

Water use is the most important environmental issue facing the horticulture industry. As a result, many water management districts are recommending native plants for their putative low-water requirements. Numerous textbooks and trade journals claim native plants use less water than non-natives; however, previous research found no difference in water use efficiency in the field between native and non-native species. Furthermore, recommendations of ornamental grasses for use as low-maintenance and low-water-requiring landscape plants have recently escalated. This study evaluated non-native Miscanthus sinensis `Adagio' and the native Eragrostis spectabilis for irrigation requirements and drought response in a landscape setting. To simulate maximum stress, both species were planted into field plots in an open-sided, clear polyethylene covered shelter. Each species was irrigated on alternating days at 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 L for a 90-day period. Growth index and height were recorded at biweekly intervals, and final shoot and root dry masses were taken at completion of the study. Significant treatment and species effects were found for height, growth index, shoot dry weight, and biomass. Plants receiving 0.75 L of irrigation had the greatest growth, and non-irrigated plants grew significantly less. Comparisons between species found growth was greatest among Eragrostis spectabilis plants for all parameters.

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Sandra B. Wilson and Gary W. Knox

Japanese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) and 14 cultivars were transplanted in northern and southern Florida and evaluated for landscape performance, flowering, growth, and seed viability. All plants survived the 84-week study at both locations with the exception of `Morning Light', where 22% to 33% of the plants died. In northern and southern Florida, `Arabesque', `Adagio', `Cosmopolitan', and `Gracillimus' received the highest visual quality ratings on average throughout the entire study, yet other cultivars such as `Central Park' and `Silberfeder' performed well but had much narrower windows of peak performance. Cultivars such as `Little Kitten' and `Sarabande' performed far better in southern Florida than in northern Florida. Regardless of location, `Morning Light' and `Puenktchen' generally did not perform as well as other cultivars. In northern Florida, four consecutive months of very good to excellent flowering (75% to 100% canopy coverage) were observed for `Adagio', `Arabesque', `Cosmopolitan', `Gracillimus', `Little Kitten', `Sarabande', `Silberfeder', and `Zebrinus'. However, in southern Florida, peak flowering periods for these cultivars were delayed and generally only lasted for 1 to 2 months. On average, plants in northern Florida were larger and produced 2.8 times more flowers than plants in southern Florida. All cultivars produced viable seed with germination of viable seed ranging from 53.6% (`Cabaret') to 100% (`Gracillimus') in southern Florida, and from 49.8% (`Arabesque') to 100% (`Adagio', `Little Kitten', `Sarabande', and `Variegatus') in northern Florida.

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James A. Gagliardi and Mark H. Brand

Survey data from 114 members (42% response rate) of the Connecticut Nursery and Landscape Association were analyzed to evaluate preferences for different potential solutions to reduce the annual sale of billions of dollars of invasive ornamental plants. The majority of respondents accurately identified key invasive plant characteristics, considered themselves to be knowledgeable about invasive plants, and cited trade journals and professional organizations as their sources of invasive plant information. Although industry members generally considered norway maple (Acer platanoides), japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), and winged euonymus (Euonymus alatus) to be invasive, only 14.5% and 8.1%, respectively, considered the emerging invasive species japanese silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis) and butterfly bush (Buddleja davidii) to be invasive. In comparing different approaches to reducing the sale of invasive ornamental plants, strong support was expressed for marketing noninvasive alternative plants (mean rank of 2.5) and for development of genetically altered sterile forms of invasive ornamentals (mean rank of 2.9; on a scale from 1 = most favorable to 6 = least favorable). Respondents strongly disfavored taxation as a method of reducing invasive plants sales (mean rank of 5.0) even if proceeds were directed toward invasive plant control and research. Plant bans (mean rank of 4.1) were also an unpopular choice for economically important crops, and respondents desired provisions for cultivars with reduced invasive risk to be included in plant bans. To foster maximum green industry participation in invasive plant control efforts, future directions should focus on creation of sterile forms of popular landscape plants, identification of consumer preference for noninvasive alternatives, and development of strong consumer education programs.

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S. Christopher Marble, Matthew T. Elmore, and James T. Brosnan

in Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’, Cortaderia selloana ‘Rosea’, Miscanthus sinensis ‘Purpurescens’, and M. sinensis ‘Gracillimus’ and reported similar findings, at least some injury was noted on all four species with each herbicide

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Wayne W. Hanna and Brian M. Schwartz

and Schwartz, 2018 ). Seed set in Miscanthus sinensis Andersson (1855) has been reduced by ploidy manipulation ( Ranney and Touchell, 2016 ) and gamma radiation ( Hanna and Schwartz, 2019 ). ‘Desert Plains’ ( Trucks, 2010 ) and ‘Ginger Love

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Wayne W. Hanna and Brian M. Schwartz

propagated ornamental plants is a desirable trait because it helps maintain the purity of the commercial cultivar. Seed set in Miscanthus sinensis has been reduced through ploidy manipulation ( Ranney and Touchell, 2016 ) and gamma radiation ( Hanna and

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Susan M. Hawkins and Carol D. Robacker

, cultures of Miscanthus sinensis had higher percentages of rooting on media supplemented with 0.2 mg·L −1 NAA than on media with no additional NAA, although higher concentrations of NAA had a deleterious effect on rooting ( Zhang et al., 2012 ). The value

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Whitney D. Phillips, Thomas G. Ranney, Darren H. Touchell, and Thomas A. Eaker

valuable nursery crops, but potentially weedy in some environments, including trumpet vine ( Campsis ×tagliabuana ) ( Oates et al., 2014 ), tutsan ( Hypericum androsaemum ) ( Trueblood et al., 2010 ), maiden grass ( Miscanthus sinensis ) ( Rounsaville et al

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Loren C. Stephens

16 Gawel, N.J. Robacker, C.D. Corely, W.L. 1990 In vitro propagation of Miscanthus sinensis HortScience 25 1291 1293 Hodges, C.F. Stephens, L.C. Campbell, D

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Sandra B. Wilson and Gary W. Knox

us from having enough seeds to conduct appropriate germination studies as performed in previous landscape evaluations of japanese silver grass ( Miscanthus sinensis ) ( Wilson and Knox, 2006 ) and butterfly bush ( Buddleja spp.) ( Wilson et al., 2004