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Subhrajit K. Saha, Laurie E. Trenholm, and J. Bryan Unruh

leachate volume. Turfgrass visual quality ratings were taken weekly on a scale of 1 to 9, with 9 being best, 1 being worst, and 6 being minimally acceptable turfgrass quality. Multispectral reflectance (MSR) readings were taken three times during each FC

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William L. Berndt

, 2002 ). Quality ratings considered elements of both visual quality and functional quality ( Beard, 1973 ), including leaf texture, color, growth habit, and shoot growth. A leaf texture rating (10 = coarse; 1 = fine) was taken on day 50 of the study

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Laurie E. Trenholm, Lawrence E. Datnoff, and Russell T. Nagata

The objectives of these studies were to evaluate the effects of silicon on drought and shade tolerance of st. augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum). Studies were conducted during 2001 in a glasshouse at the University of Florida Turfgrass Research Envirotron in Gainesville. For both drought and shade evaluations, calcium silicate slag (CaSiO3) was pre-incorporated into pots with commercial potting soil at the rate of 3.36 kg·ha-1 (0.069 lb/1000 ft2). `FX-10' and `FHSA-115' st. augustinegrass were planted into 15.2-cm-diameter × 30.5-cm-deep (6 × 12 inches) plastic pots for the drought study and subjected to minimal irrigation. Under severe drought stress, silicon-amended plants had better responses than non-amended plants. Little improvement was seen under moderate drought stress. `Floratam' and genotype 1997-6 were placed under full sunlight or 50% to 70% shade. There was no benefit from use of silicon under shaded conditions. These findings suggest that silicon might provide improved tolerance to st. augustinegrass under severe drought stress.

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Matthew D. Clark and Eric Watkins

Prairie junegrass [Koeleria macrantha (Ledeb.) Shultes] is a perennial, short-grass prairie species distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere that is being evaluated for use as a low-input turf. In June 2007, 300 genotypes representing collection locations derived from Colorado, Nebraska, and Minnesota germplasm were grown and evaluated 3 years for turfgrass performance characteristics in a randomized complete block design with five clonal replications at two locations (St. Paul, MN, and Becker, MN). After establishment, plots received no supplemental irrigation or fertility and were mowed weekly to a height of 6.4 cm. Broad-sense heritability estimates were calculated on a clonal mean (Hc) and single-plant (Hsp) basis for turf quality (Hc = 0.62, Hsp = 0.13), crown density (Hc = 0.55, Hsp = 0.09), mowing quality (Hc = 0.59, Hsp = 0.09), and genetic color (Hc = 0.45, Hsp = 0.06). The heritability estimates indicate that selection for these traits should result in significant gains in germplasm improvement. Differences were observed in the means and variances among clones, collection locations, and/or collection regions for many of the traits evaluated including rust severity (Puccinia spp.), spring green-up, plant height, lateral spread, vertical regrowth, and flowering traits. The positive correlations among some of these traits and those with moderate heritability estimates should allow for multi-trait selection in cultivar development.

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Lyn A. Gettys and William T. Haller

during the grow-out period. On day 43, each replicate was assigned a visual quality rating on a scale of 0 to 10 by the lead investigator, with a score of 0 signifying plant death and a score of 10 signifying no visible damage. All necrotic and chlorotic

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Xiaoya Cai, Laurie E. Trenholm, Jason Kruse, and Jerry B. Sartain

visual quality and color scores, shoot density, and wear tolerance correlated with K application in two paspalum ecotypes (SIPV-2 and K1). However, Johnson et al. (2003) found that there was no significant effect of K application on creeping bentgrass

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Diane M. Camberato, James J. Camberato, and Roberto G. Lopez

visual quality rating of 0 to 4 was used. Visual quality rating was as follows: 0 indicated the plant was not marketable; 1 = poor size and quality; 2 = fair size and quality; 3 = plant-filled container, foliage color appropriate; and 4 = substrate not

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Lyn A. Gettys and William T. Haller

replicate was assigned a visual quality rating on a scale of 0 to 10 by the lead investigator, with a score of 0 signifying plant death and a score of 10 signifying no visible damage. The height of the tallest plant of each species in each replicate was

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Sandra B. Wilson, Gary W. Knox, Keona L. Muller, Rosanna Freyre, and Zhanao Deng

Visual quality, flowering, and plant growth. Visual quality (plant color and form) was assessed monthly for each cultivar independently at each location. Assessments of foliage color and form were performed on a scale from 1 to 5 in which 1 = very poor

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Xuetong Fan and Kimberly J.B. Sokorai

adversely affect visual quality of lettuce during cold storage in air. In our previous study ( Fan and Sokorai, 2002 ), fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce was irradiated at doses up to 4 kGy in MAP, and it was found that overall visual appearance of lettuce