Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 1,543 items for :

  • "plant height" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Full access

Xuan Wu, Shuyin Liang, and David H. Byrne

plant architecture to explain the architectural variability observed and to combine correlated variables into one ( Crespel et al., 2013 ). They were plant height (measured in centimeters), the number of primary shoots (initial complete shoots that

Free access

Daike Tian, Ken M. Tilt, Jeff L. Sibley, Floyd M. Woods, and Fenny Dane

on plant height and emerging leaf number were taken on 20 June, 10 July, 2 Aug., 20 Aug., and 12 Sept. Underground parts were harvested on 23 Nov. 2007. Ambient temperatures and daylength of Auburn City of Alabama in 2007 were provided by Weather

Full access

Ojwang J. David, Nyankanga O. Richard, Imungi Japheth, and Olanya O. Modesto

, the number of primary and secondary branches, plant height (cm), and shelling percent. Qualitative data included seed and pod color, which were collected in situ based on the guidelines outlined in descriptors for pigeon pea. Environmental data such as

Free access

Sarah M. Smith and Zhanao Deng

bed with an in-row spacing of 30.5 cm, no fertilization was applied, and irrigation was through a seepage system ( Geraldson et al., 1965 ). Data collection. Plant height [H (centimeter)] was measured from the bed surface to the tallest point of each

Free access

Bahlebi K. Eiasu, Ntombekhaya Matafeni, Viwe Dyafta, and Kenias Chigwaya

Week 3 after treatment applications, chlorophyll readings were taken on a weekly basis (Minolta Chlorophyll Meter, SPAD-502DL; Konica Minolta, Osaka, Japan). Immediately before harvesting (4 months after cutting back), canopy diameter, plant height

Open access

Qinglu Ying, Yun Kong, and Youbin Zheng

Runkle, 2019 ; Meng et al., 2019 ). Although lowering B percentage in daytime RB-LED lighting sometimes can also promote plant height, the effects vary with species, and also can compromise other growth metrics, such as reducing leaf thickness, relative

Free access

A.D. Bratsch and H.J. Mack

Field experiments were conducted in 1986 through 1988 to evaluate the effects of rates and timing of ethephon application on growth, yield, and lodging of `Jubilee' sweet corn (Zea mays L.). As a comparison, hand-topping was performed 10 days after early silking to simulate the commercial practice of mechanical topping to reduce lodging. Ethephon reduced plant height by 12% to 26%, with timing of application determining location of internode length reductions. There was greater reduction of ear height by ethephon applied at tassel elongation (TE) than at 1 and 2 weeks later. Effects of ethephon on husked yield varied from an 8% increase in yield to an 18% decrease, depending on rate, timing, and season. Topping reduced yield in one of the four experiments. Ear length was reduced by ethephon at 0.28 kg·ha-1 in two of the four experiments. A helicopter fly-over resulted in 66% of topped plants lodging, compared to 87% of untreated plants. Lodging of plants that received an ethephon application of 0.28 kg·ha-1 at TE averaged 51% for Expts. 2, 3, and 4. The amount of lodging tended to be least in those ethephon treatments with the largest reduction `in plant or ear height. Chemical names used: 2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid (ethephon).

Open access

Qinglu Ying, Yun Kong, and Youbin Zheng

, at a PPFD of 160 µmol·m −2 ·s −1 , B 25 G 25 R 50 vs. B 50 R 50 increases shoot biomass, plant height, or leaf area in tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ), petunia ( Petunia × hybrida ), impatiens ( Impatiens walleriana ), and salvia ( Salvia

Free access

Sanliang Gu, Leslie H. Fuchigami, Sung H. Guak, and Charles Shin

Seedling plugs of `Better Boy' tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were potted in 60% processed fiber: 40% perlite (by volume) media amended or nonamended with either crystalline or powdered hydrophilic polymer (2.4 kg·m-3), and treated with one of several concentrations (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10%) of antitranspirant GLK-8924, at the four true-leaf stage. Plants were either well-irrigated or subjected to short-term water stress, withholding water for 3 days, after antitranspirant GLK-8924 application. Leaf stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, whole-plant transpirational water loss, and growth were depressed by short-term water stress and antitranspirant GLK-8924. In contrast, hydrophilic polymer amendment increased plant growth, resulting in higher transpirational water loss. The depression of stomatal conductance and transpiration rate by short-term water stress was reversed completely in 2 days after rewatering while the reduction of plant growth rate diminished immediately. The effects of antitranspirant GLK-8924 were nearly proportional to its concentration and lasted 8 days on stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, 4 days on plant growth rate, and throughout the experimental period on plant height and transpirational water loss. Plant growth was reduced by antitranspirant GLK-8924 possibly by closing leaf stomata. In contrast, hydrophilic polymer amendment resulted in larger plants by factors other than influences attributed to stomatal status. Hydrophilic polymer amendment did not interact with antitranspirant GLK-8924 on all variables measured. The application of antitranspirant GLK-8924 was demonstrated to be useful for regulating plant water status, plant growth, and protecting plants from short-term water stress.

Full access

Linsey A. Newton and Erik S. Runkle

active endogenous gibberellins by PGRs can reduce plant height. Paclobutrazol effectively inhibits elongation of several floriculture crops, including seed impatiens ( Impatiens walleriana ), salvia ( Salvia splendens ), marigold ( Tagetes erecta