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Tsuyoshi Habu, Fumio Kishida, Miki Morikita, Akira Kitajima, Toshiaki Yamada, and Ryutaro Tao

Japanese apricot (Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc.) exhibits S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility as do other Prunus species. Both self-incompatible and self-compatible Japanese apricot cultivars are grown commercially in Japan. These self-compatible cultivars are shown to have a common S-haplotype called S f that contains S f-RNase and SFB f (S-haplotype-specific F-box protein). This study describes a simple and rapid detection of SFB f, in Japanese apricot, based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. A set of 4 primers, F3, B3, FIP, and BIP primer, were designed from the exon and the putative inserted sequence of SFB f. Optimal reaction time at 63 C was determined to be 90 minutes. It appeared that the LAMP method combined with the ultrasimple DNA extraction efficiently detected SFB f. The advantage of the marker-assisted selection of self-compatibility based on the LAMP method was discussed.

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Doron Holland, Irit Bar-Ya'akov, Kamel Hatib, and Reuven Birger

drawbacks raised the need for new good-quality self-pollinating Israeli cultivars that contain the dominant Sf allele ( Lὁpez et al., 2001 ). Here, we describe the characteristics of ‘Matan’, a newly bred cultivar, with self-compatibility producing high

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Doron Holland, Irit Bar-Ya'akov, and Kamel Hatib

Newe-Ya'ar is from 7 to 26 March; ‘Santa Rosa’ and ‘Laroda’ start flowering in Newe-Ya'ar 2 weeks after ‘Shezifon’. Self-compatibility and pollination. Sealing unopened flowers with paper bags resulted in 19.3% fruit set. Therefore, we conclude

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Federico Dicenta, Teresa Cremades, Pedro José Martínez-García, Pedro Martínez-Gómez, Encarnación Ortega, Manuel Rubio, Raquel Sánchez-Pérez, Jesús López-Alcolea, and José Egea

-compatible and late-flowering cultivars. The first crosses were carried out in 1985. Late flowering decreases the risk of late frosts coinciding with flowering or fruit formation, thus avoiding crop losses. Self-compatibility enables a cultivar to produce fruit

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David Ruiz, Manuel Rubio, Pedro Martínez-Gómez, Jesús López-Alcolea, Federico Dicenta, Encarna Ortega, María Dolores Nortes, Antonio Molina, Antonio Molina Jr., and Jose Egea

Spanish cultivar, of unknown origin, Colorado (male parent) ( Fig. 1 ). This cross was made with the objective of obtaining self-compatibility, extra-early season ripening, and sharka (PPV)-resistant cultivars, as well as excellent fruit quality and

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Rafel Socias i Company, Ossama Kodad, José M. Alonso, and Antonio J. Felipe

. z Autogamy Self-compatibility was tested as soon as the original seedlings produced the first flowers by examining the arrival or not of pollen tubes at the ovary after self-pollination (data not shown). Sets after self

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Rafel Socias i Company, Ossama Kodad, José M. Ansón, and José M. Alonso

high and consistent ( Kodad and Socias i Company, 2008b ). Autogamy Self-compatibility was tested as soon as the original seedling produced the first flowers by examining the arrival or not of pollen tubes at the ovary after self-pollination (data not

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Alan T. Whittemore and Alden M. Townsend

. The genus Celtis was traditionally placed in Ulmaceae ( Mabberley, 1997 ), a group of plants that are commonly self-incompatible, but recent work indicates that the relationship between Celtis and Ulmus L. is not as close as was once believed

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J. Egea, D. Ruiz, and L. Burgos

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J. Egea, F. Dicenta, and L. Burgos