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Ernesto A. Brovelli, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Wayne B. Sherman, and Jay M. Harrison

Potential maturity indices were determined for two melting-flesh (FL 90-20 and Tropic Beauty) and two nonmelting-flesh (Oro A and Fl 86-28 C) peach cultivars. A range of developmental stages was obtained by conducting two harvests and separating fruit based on their diameter. Fruit in each category were divided into two groups. One group was used for determining potential maturity indices: soluble solids, titratable acidity, soluble solids: titratable acidity, peel and flesh color on the cheeks (CH) and blossom end (BE), CH and BE texture, ethylene production, and respiration rate. The other group was stored at 0°C for 1 week and ripened at 20°C for 2 days to simulate actual handling conditions, and were presented to a trained sensory panel, which rated the fruit for three textural (hardness, rubberiness, and juiciness) and three flavor aspects (sweetness; sourness; bitterness; and green, peachy, and overripe character). Principal component (PC) analysis was used to consolidate the results of the descriptive sensory evaluation into a single variable that could be correlated with the objective measurements at harvest. The first overall PC explained 40% of the total variation. Following are the attributes that best correlated with PC 1 and, thus, are promising maturity indices: for FL 90-20, peel hue, peel L, and CH texture; for Tropic Beauty, peel L, CH texture, and BE texture; for Oro A, CH texture, BE texture, and CH chroma; for 86-28C, BE texture, CH hue, and CH texture.

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Elsa Sánchez and Richard Craig

Plant systematics is a sophomore level, 3-credit, required course for undergraduate students majoring in horticulture offered through the Department of Horticulture at The Pennsylvania State University. The course consists of twice weekly lecture

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Elsa Sánchez and Richard Craig

management ( Murano and Knight, 1999b ). Cooperative learning activities also can encourage student independence and self-directedness ( Pennington, 2004 ). The plant systematics course offered through the Department of Horticulture at The Pennsylvania State

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Chengyan Yue, R. Karina Gallardo, James Luby, Alicia Rihn, James R. McFerson, Vicki McCracken, David Bedford, Susan Brown, Kate Evans, Cholani Weebadde, Audrey Sebolt, and Amy F. Iezzoni

breeding a new apple cultivar is a complex problem. One solution is to systematically obtain input from the supply chain. In this study, we collected apple producers’ rankings of importance for fruit quality and tree traits using an audience survey, a

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Jacob Mashilo, Hussein Shimelis, Alfred Odindo, and Beyene Amelework

South Africa, there is no recent and detailed information regarding its systematic characterization using molecular markers. Genetic diversity analysis using molecular markers may effectively characterize the South African bottle gourd landraces for

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Ting Liao, Guobin Liu, Liqin Guo, Ye Wang, Yanwu Yao, and Jun Cao

( Zhang et al., 2017 ). Embryonal development revealed the annual cycle of ovulate cone development in Pinus sibirica in the western Sayan Mountains ( Tretyakova et al., 2004 ). An embryological study revealed the systematic significance of the primitive

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Cary A. Mitchell

systematically to turn out statistically validated, peer-reviewed publications that are incremental contributions, and training researchers who will become future experts on LED applications for horticulture. How commercial product specifications come about

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Sandra B. Wilson and Luke Flory

material, the multiple-entry process of FloraGator has created a powerful online learning tool for anyone studying botany, plant identification, and plant systematics. By selecting from a database of 220 features specific to the habit, leaves, flowers

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Elizabeth Duncan, Ann Marie VanDerZanden, Cynthia Haynes, and Levon Esters

Outcomes assessment is a process used to continually improve student learning by systematically assessing the effectiveness of and adjusting the curriculum. Outcomes assessment provides a way for students to show their achievement of learner

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Lorenzo León, Raúl de la Rosa, Diego Barranco, and Luis Rallo

yield of the individual seedlings in the first three harvest seasons were recorded ( León et al., 2004b ). In the comparative field trial orchard containing the 15 selections and the three genitors, plants were systematically evaluated for earliness of