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Raúl Leonel Grijalva-Contreras, Arturo López-Carbajal, Adán Fimbres-Fontes, Cristobal Navarro-Ainza, Rogelio Juárez-González, and Fabián Robles-Contreras

Apricot production in México is limited; actually, the area devoted to this crop is ≈880 ha, of which 230 ha are established in Sonora State. The main cultivar used is `Canino'. The fruit yield ranges from 15-20 t·ha-1. The present study tested 20 low-chilling (300 to 400 chill hours) requirments of apricot selections; `Nemaguard' was the rootstock used. On the 4rth production year from the 20 apricot selection tested, 7-23, 1-81, and 15-1 yielded 31.8, 20.2. and 15.5 Ton.Ha-1, respectively; all of these selections showed higher yields than the Canino cultivar (14.6 t·ha-1). The fruit of these apricot selectiosn ripened by mid-May, exhibiting all the tested selection a similar fruit quality (size, flavor, color, and °Brix). We have not recorded any important insect pests or diseases during this trial.

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Jon Lloyd and Daryl Firth

In a relatively low-chill environment, two cultivars of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] differing in chilling requirement (`Flordaprince', 150 units and `Flordagold', 325 units) were defoliated at 10-day intervals during midautumn. Effects of defoliation on depth of bud dormancy and dose-dependent responses of cuttings to hydrogen cyanamide throughout the dormant period were analyzed to develop a dormancy index (DI). DI values indicate that early defoliation reduces depth of bud dormancy throughout winter for both cultivars. For `Flordaprince', this was translated into early leafing and bloom, but fruit size was reduced by early relative to late defoliation. In contrast to `Flordaprince', vegetative and floral budbreak of `Flordagold' were delayed by early defoliation. These results indicate that early defoliation affects depth of dormancy and growth ability of buds, but that the extent to which these factors affect bud development depends on cultivar.

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Todd Wert, Jeffrey G. Williamson, Robert E. Rouse, and E. Paul Miller

Four low-chill peach cultivars were evaluated for vegetative and reproductive growth, fruit quality, and yield in north central and central Florida. Twenty-trees (five of each cultivar) were planted at each site in Feb. 2002. Prior to budbreak in the spring of 2004 and 2005, three shoots of average length and diameter were selected at a height of 1.5–2.0 m and the number of vegetative and flower buds was recorded for each shoot. Percentage of bloom was estimated, and the number of open flowers on selected shoots was measured weekly. Trees were harvested twice per week starting in mid-April in central Florida, and in late April in north central Florida. Total number and weight of marketable fruit was measured for each tree. Ten representative fruits were selected from each tree at each harvest. Fruit were measured for blush, weight, and size. Soluble solids, TAA, and pressure were determined for five fruit from each 10-fruit sample. Preliminary results indicate a higher mean number of blind nodes in central Florida and a higher mean number of flower buds in north central Florida. In central Florida, 90% bloom was about 4 days earlier than north central Florida. Fruit number and individual fruit size, weight, and marketable yield were higher in north central Florida than in central Florida. Fruit blush was higher in central Florida than in north central Florida and tended to increase as the season progressed. In north central Florida, blush decreased slightly throughout the season.

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

. ‘Smooth Zest One’ was selected from a cross between a white fleshed, semifreestone peach, TX3D75W, and the low chill peach ‘TexFirst’ ( Byrne and Anderson, 2012 ). TX3D75W is from a cross between a white peach with unknown parentage and the Florida

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Dario J. Chavez and Paul M. Lyrene

self-pollination. This indicated the potential for developing low-chill highbush cultivars that would give reliable fruit set when planted in solid blocks containing a single clone. Literature Cited Bailey, J.S. 1938 The pollination of the cultivated

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Todd Wert, Jeffrey G. Williamson, and Robert E. Rouse

Four low-chill peach cultivars were evaluated at three locations in Florida for vegetative and reproductive bud development and fruit set. Twenty trees (five each of `Flordaprince', `Tropicbeauty', `UFgold', and `Flordaglo') were planted at each site in Feb. 2002. Prior to budbreak in Spring 2004 and 2005, three shoots per tree of average length and diameter were selected at a height between 1.5–2.0 m and the numbers of vegetative and flower buds per node were recorded for each shoot. No consistent pattern for the number of vegetative buds per node was observed among cultivars and locations, or across years. However, 'Tropicbeauty' tended to have fewer vegetative buds per node than `Flordaprince' during both seasons, although not at all locations. Overall, the number of flower buds per node was greater for north-central Florida than for central or southwest Florida. There were no consistent tends over years and among locations for the ranked order of flower buds per node by cultivar. The percentage of nodes without flower or vegetative buds (blind nodes) was generally greatest for `Tropicbeauty' at most locations during both years. During 2005, the percentage of blind nodes was greater in central and southwest Florida than in north-central Florida. Overall, fruit set was similar between the central and north-central Florida locations. Fruit set tended to be higher for `UFGold' and `Flordaglo' than for `Flordaprince' or `Tropicbeauty'.

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Ming-Wei S. Kao, Jeffrey K. Brecht, and Jeffrey G. Williamson

The bulk of peach production in the United States occurs in temperate, high-chill regions, with fruit available from late May through October. Developing low-chill peach cultivars in the subtropical regions that produce fruit in the early season is

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

Texan One’ (ST1, TX3B298N) is a cross between ‘Crimson Baby’, a yellow-fleshed, medium chill nectarine released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Stone Fruit Breeding Program in Fresno, CA ( Okie, 1998 ), and a low chill nectarine selection

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David H. Byrne and Natalie Anderson

early-ripening, medium-chill peach, ‘Victor’. ‘Victor’ was released by Texas A&M University for use in Spain and is a seedling from the cross between the low-chill, yellow-fleshed, midseason cultivar Tropic Beauty and the early-ripening, yellow