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R.L. Fery and P.D. Dukes

The USDA has released a new cream-type southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] cultivar that is well adapted for productionthroughout the southern United States. The new cultivar, named `Tender Cream', is the product of a backcross breeding procedure to transfer the dominant Rk gene for root-knot nematode resistance from `Floricream' into `Carolina Cream'. `Tender Cream' is resistant to cowpea curculio, root-knot nematodes, southern bean mosaic virus, cercospora leaf spot, southern blight, rust, and powdery mildew. `Tender Cream' outyielded the cream control in the 1992, 1993, and 1994 Regional Southernpea Cooperative Trials by 5.4%, 11.0%, and 18.8%, respectively. It outyielded its root-knot-nematode-susceptible `Carolina Cream' isoline by 22.3% in a replicated 1994 test conducted in a field infested with a natural population of the southern root-knot nematode. Canned samples of fresh `Tender Cream' peas scored well during 3 years of testing at the Univ. of Arkansas.

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F.A. Hammerschlag and R.N. Huettel

Five in vitro propagated peach scion cultivars (Suncrest, Rio Oso Gem, Compact Redhaven, Redhaven, Jerseyqueen) and two rootstock (Nemaguard and Lovell) were screened in vitro and in microplots for their susceptibility to the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. Evaluations in tissue culture for galling were conducted at 5 wk. Trees in microplots were evaluated for 3 years for nematode populations, trunk diameter, and yield. Comparative results indicated that the number and size of galls observed at 5 wk in vitro is indicative of the response of peaches to nematodes under field conditions after three years. Cultivar Compact Redhaven was significantly more tolerant to root-knot than `Lovell' the most widely used peach rootstock. These results suggest that Compact Redhaven might be potentially useful as a rootstock in the Southeast where Nemaguard is used sparingly because of its lack of cold tolerance. In addition, these results indicate that in vitro screening holds promise as a rapid technique for evaluating root-knot nematode resistance.

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Wenjing Guan, Xin Zhao, Danielle D. Treadwell, Michael R. Alligood, Donald J. Huber, and Nicholas S. Dufault

‘Camposol’, which showed a similar level of galling as ‘Athena’. Table 5. Aboveground diseases severity and root-knot nematode (RKN) gall ratings of 10 specialty melons and ‘Athena’ cantaloupe under organic and conventional production during Spring 2011 at

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Kathryn E. Brunson, Sharad C. Phatak, J. Danny Gay, and Donald R. Summer

Velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana L.) was used in crop rotation to determine the influence on southern root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) in sustainable vegetable production. Replicated trials were conducted at four locations. Two cover crop treatments, crimson clover and subterranean clover, were used in the sustainable plots and rye was the plow-down cover crop for the conventional plots. Selected as the vegetable crops were tomato, pepper, and eggplant. Following the final harvest, velvetbean was planted into the sustainable plots and disked under after 90 days. Results from soil samples before and after velvetbean, indicated the sustainable plots had substantially reduced nematode densities, while most conventional plots showed increases. A correlation between location, treatment, root-gall indexes and nematode density occurred in all crops for 1992. In 1993 there was only a correlation between root-gall index and nematode density in pepper. However, root-gall indexes were significant for location and treatment in all crops.

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Aref A. Abdul-Baki, S. A. Haroon, and R. N. Huettel

Susceptibility of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) genotpyes to the root-knot nematode Meloydogyne incognita and to heat stress can be evaluated in a single labor- and time-saving operation using a nondestructive in vitro excised root technique. Seeds are sterilized and germinated for 2 days on 1% water agar. Five-mm root sections are grown at 28 and 35 C for 30 days on Gamborg-B medium with and without nematode inoculum. Evaluation criteria include fresh and dry weight and the appearance of juveniles, adults, gulls, and egg masses. Evidence will be presented on the breakdown of resistance to M. incognita under high temperature stress.

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Judy A. Thies, Richard L. Fery, John D. Mueller, Gilbert Miller, and Joseph Varne

Resistance of two sets of bell pepper [(Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum (Grossum Group)] cultivars near-isogenic for the N gene that conditions resistance to root-knot nematodes [Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White, M. arenaria (Neal) Chitwood races 1 and 2, and M. javanica (Treub) Chitwood] was evaluated in field tests at Blackville, S.C. and Charleston, S.C. The isogenic bell pepper sets were `Charleston Belle' (NN) and `Keystone Resistant Giant' (nn), and `Carolina Wonder' (NN) and `Yolo Wonder B' (nn). The resistant cultivars Charleston Belle and Carolina Wonder were highly resistant; root galling was minimal for both cultivars at both test sites. The susceptible cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant and Yolo Wonder B were highly susceptible; root galling was severe at both test sites. `Charleston Belle' had 96.9% fewer eggs per g fresh root than `Keystone Resistant Giant', and `Carolina Wonder' had 98.3% fewer eggs per g fresh root than `Yolo Wonder B' (averaged over both test sites). `Charleston Belle' and `Carolina Wonder' exhibited a high level of resistance in field studies at both sites. These results demonstrate that resistance conferred by the N gene for root-knot nematode resistance is effective in field-planted bell pepper. Root-knot nematode resistant bell peppers should provide economical and environmentally compatible alternatives to methyl bromide and other nematicides for managing M. incognita.

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W.R. Okie, G.L. Reighard, T.G. Beckman, A.P. Nyczepir, C.C. Reilly, E.I. Zehr, W.C. Newall Jr., and D.W. Cain

Long-term field trials of a wide range of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] germplasm on two peach tree short-life (PTSL) sites revealed marked differences in survival among lines. Generally, cuttings and seedlings of a given line performed similarly, as did ungrafted seedlings and their counterparts grafted to a commercial cultivar. No apparent relationship existed between a line's chilling requirement and survival. B594520-9 survived best in Georgia and South Carolina, providing significantly greater longevity than Lovell, the standard rootstock for use on PTSL sites. B594520-9 is derived from root-knot-nematode-resistant parentage, and progeny of surviving seedlings have demonstrated root-knot resistance similar to Nemaguard seedlings.

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Eduard Alcañiz, Jorge Pinochet, Carolina Fernández, Daniel Esmenjaud, and Antonio Felipe

Fourteen Prunus rootstocks were evaluated against mixtures of several isolates of the root-lesion nematode Pratylenchus vulnus Allen and Jensen in three greenhouse experiments. Most of the tested rootstocks are new releases or materials in advanced stages of selection that also have incorporated root-knot nematode resistance. The plums Torinel (Prunusdomestica L.) and Redglow (P. salicina Lindl. P. munsoniana Wight and Hedrick cv. Jewel) showed a moderately resistant response; their final nematode population levels were lower or slightly higher than inoculation levels. Low nematode reproduction also was found in the peach–almond hybrid G N No 22 [P. persica (L.) Batsch P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] and the plum Bruce (P. salicina P. angustifolia Marsh.), and although these rootstocks did not perform as well as Torinel and Redglow, they also appear to be poor hosts for P. vulnus.

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Jorge Pinochet, Carolina Fernández, María de Carmen Jaizme, and Pedro Tenoury

The effects of the interaction between the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices Schenk and Smith and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica (Treub) Chitwood on growth and nutrition of micropropagated `Grand Naine' banana (Musa AAA) were studied under greenhouse conditions. Inoculation with G. intraradices significantly increased growth of plants in relation to nonmycorrhizal plants and was more effective than P fertilization in promoting plant development. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect nematode buildup in the roots, although plants with the nematode and mycorrhiza were more galled. Meloidogyne javanica had no effect on the percentage of root colonization in mycorrhiza-inoculated plants. No element deficiency was detected by foliar analysis. All elements were within sufficiency levels for banana with exception of N, which was low. Potassium levels were lower in mycorrhizal plants, while Ca and Mg levels were higher with mycorrhiza than without, with or without the nematode. Early inoculation with G. intraradices appears to favor growth of banana plants by enhancing plant nutrition.

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E. Zamora, P.W. Bosland, and S. Thomas

The resistance of `Carolina Cayenne' (Capsicum annuum L.) to root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White) Chitwood races 1, 2, 3, and 4 was measured. Egg counts from roots were used to determine the plant's resistance to M. incognita. Few eggs were observed on `Carolina Cayenne' roots, whereas all races of M. incognita produced numerous eggs on the susceptible `NuMex R Naky' roots. The results indicated `Carolina Cayenne' is a source of resistance to all known races of M. incognita.