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James D. McCurdy, J. Scott McElroy, and Elizabeth A. Guertal

/year, although most are roughly 10 to 25 g N/m 2 /year ( Ledgard and Steele, 1992 ; McNeill and Wood, 1990 ). White clover is well suited for use within warm-season turfgrasses and is already a common feature within bermudagrass pastures of the

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Michael Maurer* and Justin Weeaks

Throughout much of the Southwestern United States, poor quality water and limited water resources require innovative methods to conserve water. No research to date has indicated whether seeded bermudagrass Cynodon dactylon can be established by using subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In 2001 (Expt. I) and 2002 (Expt. II), seeded bermudagrass was evaluated for establishment using SDI. Treatments consisted of emitters and tubing spaced at 30, 46, and 61 cm. The control treatment consisted of pop-up sprinklers. Salinity accumulation is a concern when irrigating turfgrass in areas of poor water quality and low annual rainfall. Salinity accumulation was visible at the soil surface during establishment in 2001, but turfgrass showed no visible signs of stress due to salinity. In 2002, substantial rainfall reduced salinity accumulation during establishment as salinity was not present on the soil surface. Salinity accumulation was greater in most months at the 0-15 cm depth in both years compared to the 15-30 cm depth. Full turfgrass coverage (≥90%) for the control plots in 2001 was about 8.5 weeks and the SDI treatments had complete coverage in 10 weeks. Turfgrass coverage for all treatments in 2002 was 9 weeks. Expt. II had a slightly faster establishment rate due to greater rainfall and different soil characteristics than that of Expt. I. Root count and depth of roots for both years showed roots to 61 cm depth in all treatments. A general trend of higher salinity accumulation at the midpoint between tubing was seen in Expts. I and II. However, after significant rainfall salinity levels returned to concentrations comparable to initial soil salinity concentrations in both years. This research documents the ability to successfully establish seeded bermudagrass using SDI.

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G.L. Miller, L.B. McCarty, and I.R. Rodriguez

Establishment of an acceptable turfgrass quality on sand-based golf putting greens presents major agronomic and environmental challenges to turfgrass managers. The objective of this study was to evaluate of five N:P:K fertilizer ratios to aid in the establishment of bermudagrass on sand-peat (85:15 v/v). `Floradwarf' and `Tifdwarf' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burt-Davy] were sprigged in Aug. 1996 at the Envirogreen in Gainesville, Fla. `Tifeagle' and `Tifway' bermudagrass were sprigged in May 1999 at Clemson Univ. research green in Clemson, S.C. Treatments consisted of N:P2O5:K2O ratios of 1:0:1, 1:0:2, 1:1:1, 1:2:1, and 1:3:1 applied based on an N rate of 49 kg/ha per week. Treatments were applied weekly for 7 weeks. In Gainesville, the best growth rate was achieved from the 1:1:1 ratio of N:P2O5:K2O. While the 1:2:1 and 1:3:1 plots filled in well, they did not experience the same coverage rates as plots fertilized with the 1:1:1 ratio. In Clemson, similar growth was achieved with the 1:1:1, 1:2:1, and 1:3:1 treatments. The 1:0:1 and 1:0:2 plots were slow to establish at both locations. In general there were no differences in root and shoot dry weights of grasses grown in Clemson; whereas these weights were positively correlated to growth rates in Gainesville. These studies indicate that turf will respond to P fertilizer when it is grown in a P-deficit situation and that N or K cannot substitute for balanced nutrition.

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Glenn R. Wehtje, Joey N. Shaw, Robert H. Walker, and Walker Williams

Various inorganic soil amendments have been promoted as a means of improving the chemical and physical properties of certain soils. To test this hypothesis, a marginally productive soil was supplemented with 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% (v/v) of either selected inorganic amendments or sand. Amendments consisted of commercially available diatomaceous earth, calcined clay, zeolite, and crystalline SiO2. The soil material was extracted from the argillic horizon of a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludults). Ability of these soil-amendment mixtures to promote `Tifway' bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt Davy] growth was evaluated under greenhouse conditions, and contrasted to that obtained in nonamended soil. Selected chemical and physical properties that are pertinent to plant growth were also evaluated. The experiment, which was conducted 3×, began with a §60-day period in which both water and nutrients were optimum. This was followed by a 30-day drought. During optimum water and nutrients, no soil-amendment treatment(s) consistently resulted in superior bermudagrass growth compared to soil alone. However, <2% of the bermudagrass tissue that was produced during the drought became green and succulent with the resumption of irrigation in nonamended soil. This percentage was exceeded by all treatments that contained either ≥60% diatomaceous earth (Axis), or ≥40% calcined clay (Profile); and by 100% zeolite (Clinolite) and 100% silica (Green's Choice). Drought-sustaining ability of soil-amendment mixtures was significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with water-holding ability, soil strength, bulk density, and oxygen diffusion rate, but not correlated with either pH or cation exchange capacity (CEC). While certain inorganic amendments did improve the drought-sustaining ability of soil, the amount required was generally ≥40%.

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B.J. Johnson

A field experiment was conducted over 2 years to determine the effects of treatment dates with plant growth regulators (PGRs) on performance of `Tifway' bermudagrass [Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] × [C. dactylon (L.) Pers.]. For flurprimidol at 0.84 kg·ha-1, the highest injury occurred from 16 or 28 June application in 1987 and from 17 May or June application in 1988. The injury was similar from treatment dates with flurprimidol + mefluidide or paclobutrazol + mefluidide. The PGRs were applied over a longer period in 1987 than 1988 without affecting vegetative suppression of `Tifway' bermudagrass. However, in 1988, the suppression from the 17 May treatment was equal to or better than that obtained when treatment dates were delayed until 1 June or later. Chemical names: α-(1 -methylethyl)- α -[4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanol (flurprimidol); N -[2,4-dimethyl-5-[[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amino]phenyl]acetamide (mefluidide); (±)-(R*R*) β -[(4-chlorophenyl)-methyl]- α -(1,1-dimethylethyl)- 1H -1,2,4-triazole- 1-ethanol (paclobutrazol).

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E.A. Guertal and J.N. Shaw

A 3-year study was conducted in Auburn, Ala., on an established hybrid bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy `Tifway'] stand maintained at a 2.54-cm mowing height. Treatments were level of soil traffic applied via a weighted golf cart to produce turf and soil that received varying amounts of traffic. Dormant bermudagrass was overseeded with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) each October, which remained until May of each year. Spectral data were collected monthly using a multispectral radiometer. Percent reflectance data were acquired over 512 discrete wavelengths in visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) ranges. Quarterly data collection included soil penetrometer and bulk density measurements to a depth of 15 cm. After 2 years of traffic, both soil penetrometer and bulk density data indicated statistically significant increases in soil compaction. In general, as traffic increased there were also increases in percent reflectance in the VIS range. Data were subject to temporal variation, however, as values changed with the date of sample collection. The NIR reflectance data provided little consistent correlation to measurements of soil compaction. Use of NIR and VIS radiometry to evaluate turf stress showed some potential, but temporal variation must be considered.

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Manuel Chavarria, Benjamin Wherley, James Thomas, Ambika Chandra, and Paul Raymer

because they function as biological filters that can assimilate excess nutrients and, to some extent, salts from saline water ( Hayes et al., 1990 ). Bermudagrass, seashore paspalum, zoysiagrass, and st. augustinegrass are four of the most widely used turf

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John Wells, Jiyu Yan, Melissa Riley, Suresh Samala, and Vance Baird

Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) cultivars may exhibit increased tolerance to cold following periods of exposure to moderately cold temperature (i.e., acclimation). We are evaluating biochemical changes and the regulation of gene expression in two cultivars—'Midiron' and U-3—during this acclimation period. Total membrane lipid fatty acids per unit of total lipids (MLFA/TL; μg·mg–1) increased in crowns over the 4-week exposure to chilling temperatures (8C day/2C night). Of the fatty acids comprising 95% of total MFLA, concentrations of short-chain and saturated FAs declined significantly while unsaturated longer-chain FA concentration increased. As a result, the double bond index (percent of each FA x number of double bonds in the FA) increased during the period of low temperature exposure, indicative of increasing membrane fluidity. Changes in MFLA were evident as early as 4 days following exposure to chilling temperatures. Identification of mRNA species expressed in response to low temperature utilized differential display-PCR. Initial screening with paired T11N1N 2 3'-anchor and 5'-random decamer primers has identified transcripts differentially expressed as early as 23 h post-exposure and was maintained for at least an additional 36 h. Isolation, reamplification, and cloning of these identified PCR products is in progress.

Open access

Brian M. Schwartz, Wayne W. Hanna, Lisa L. Baxter, Paul L. Raymer, F. Clint Waltz, Alec R. Kowalewski, Ambika Chandra, A. Dennis Genovesi, Benjamin G. Wherley, Grady L. Miller, Susana R. Milla-Lewis, William C. Reynolds, Yanqi Wu, Dennis L. Martin, Justin Q. Moss, Michael P. Kenna, J. Bryan Unruh, Kevin E. Kenworthy, Jing Zhang, and Patricio R. Munoz

There are ≈20 million hectares of turfgrass managed in the United States, constituting the $40 billion turfgrass industry ( National Turfgrass Federation, 2017 ). In most tropical and warm, temperate regions, bermudagrass ( Cynodon spp.) is the

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Aaron J. Patton, Jon M. Trappe, and Michael D. Richardson

establishment compared with control plots when irrigated ( Hensler et al., 2001 ). Porous germination blankets made from spun-bound polyester can be used to establish bermudagrass and zoysiagrass ( Patton et al., 2004 ), but these covers did not improve the