Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 31 items for

  • Author or Editor: Jude Grosser x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Jude W. Grosser*, J.L. Chandler, and R.M. Goodrich

Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) is the most horticulturally important and widely grown Citrus species in Florida and worldwide, and `Valencia' is the most important cultivar for processing. Frozen concentrate orange juice has been the primary product of the Florida and Brazilian industries, but recently there has been a strong shift to not from concentrate (NFC) product in Florida. The higher quality NFC has a greater consumer appeal, and brings a higher market price. The development of higher quality oranges with expanded maturity dates will facilitate this change and should increase the competitive ability of the Florida industry. No true sweet orange cultivars have been developed by conventional breeding due to biological impediments, and alternative methods to obtain genetic variation are being investigated, including studies of somaclonal variation. We have produced nearly 1000 somaclones of `Valencia' sweet orange using organogenesis, somatic embryogenesis, and protoplasts. Following several years of fruit evaluation, early and late maturing high quality somaclones have been identified based on juice analytical data (brix, acid, ratio, juice percentage, juice color, and lbs. solids). These clones have also performed exceptionally in taste panel evaluations comparing them with the traditional mid- and late-season cultivars. Second generation trees of the most promising clones have been propagated for further evaluation, and superior processing clones will be released to the Florida industry in the near future. An overview of this program including pilot plant juice quality data and taste panel results will be presented.

Free access

Jude W. Grosser, Victor Medina-Urrutia, Govindarajulu Ananthakrishnan, and Patricia Serrano

Sour orange has been a premier citrus rootstock worldwide due to its ability to perform on challenging soils and to produce and hold high-quality fruit. However, increasingly widespread quick-decline isolates of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) have destroyed entire industries on sour orange in some countries, and are in the process of destroying millions of trees on sour orange in Florida. CTV also threatens other citrus locations planted heavy to sour orange, including Texas and Mexico. An acceptable alternative rootstock to replace sour orange is in high demand but has yet to be developed. Molecular analyses have recently determined that sour orange is probably a hybrid of pummelo and mandarin. We report the production of 12 new mandarin + pummelo somatic hybrids produced by protoplast fusion from selected superior mandarin and pummelo parents, in efforts to develop a suitable replacement sour-orange-like rootstock that is resistant to CTV-induced quick decline. Somatic hybrids from all 12 parental combinations were confirmed by a combination of leaf morphology, flow cytometry, and RAPD analyses (for nuclear hybridity). These new mandarin + pummelo somatic hybrids are being propagated by rooted cuttings as necessary to conduct quick-decline resistance assays and to assess horticultural performance in replicated field trials.

Open access

Flavia T. Zambon, Davie M. Kadyampakeni, and Jude W. Grosser

There is accumulating evidence that root system collapse is a primary symptom associated with Huanglongbing (HLB)-induced tree decline, especially for commercial sweet orange and grapefruit trees on Swingle and Carrizo rootstocks. Maintaining root health is imperative to keep trees productive in an HLB-endemic environment. Preliminary greenhouse and field studies have shown that HLB-impacted trees had secondary and micronutrient deficiencies that were much greater in the roots than in the leaves, and that treatments containing three-times the recommended dose of manganese (Mn) improved tree health and growth and increased feeder root density in greenhouse trees. These results suggested that trees in an HLB-endemic environment have higher specific micronutrient requirements than those currently recommended. To test this hypothesis, established Vernia sweet orange grafted onto rough lemon rootstock trees were divided into eight supplemental CRF nutrition treatments (including two-times and four-times the recommended doses of Mn and boron) using a randomized complete block design in a commercial grove in St. Cloud, FL. The following supplemental nutrition treatments were used: no extra nutrition (control); Harrell’s–St. Helena mix 0.9 kg per tree; Harrell’s with 32 g of Florikan polycoated sodium borate (PSB) per tree; Harrell’s with 90 g of TigerSul® Mn sulfate (MS) per tree; Harrell’s with 32 g of PSB and 90 g of MS per tree; 180 g of MS per tree; 64 g of PSB per tree; and 180 g of MS plus 64 g of PSB per tree applied every 6 months since Fall 2015. Leaf and soil nutritional analyses were performed in Mar. 2017, Sept. 2017, and May 2018; a quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) titer estimation in Nov. 2017. Significantly higher cycle threshold (Ct) values indicating reduced CLas bacterial populations were observed in trees that received the higher doses of Mn, especially those receiving four-times the recommended dosage of Mn (180 g Mn). Many trees exhibited Ct values of 32 or more, indicating a nonactive infection. Fruit yields of these trees were also increased. No significant differences in juice characteristics, canopy volume, and trunk section area were found between control plants and plants treated with 180 g Mn. Soil and leaf nutrients B, K, Mn, and Zn were significantly different among treatments at various times during the study. Our results strongly suggest that overdoses of Mn can suppress CLas bacterial titers in sweet orange trees on rough lemon rootstock, thus providing a therapeutic effect that can help restore tree health and fruit yields. This response was not observed when Mn and B were combined in the overdose, suggesting an antagonistic effect from B on Mn metabolism. When an overdose of Mn is used, biological functions and tree tolerance lost due to nutritional imbalances caused by HLB might be restored. Further studies are needed to elucidate which metabolic pathways are altered by comparing overdosed and conventionally fertilized HLB-impacted trees and to determine if the observed therapeutic effects can be achieved in trees grafted to other important commercial rootstocks.

Full access

Ed Stover, David G. Hall, Jude Grosser, Barrett Gruber, and Gloria A. Moore

The primary objective of this experiment was to determine if the selection of rootstock (Citrus and hybrids) could enhance the development of huanglongbing (HLB)-related symptoms associated with the pathogen Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). If so, then it may permit more rapid identification of HLB-susceptible compared to HLB-resistant scion types. The secondary objective was to assess the impact of different rootstocks on plant growth parameters and health to determine if trees on any rootstocks displayed reduced sensitivity to HLB-influenced growth restriction. ‘Valencia’ sweet orange was budded on each of the following eight genotypes: Carrizo (C. sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata); Cleopatra (C. reshni); Green-7 {a complex allotetraploid from somatic hybrids [C. clementina × (C. paradisi × C. reticulata) + C. grandis] × [(C. aurantium + (C. sinensis × P. trifoliata)]}; UFR-2 (a complex allotetraploid from somatic hybrids {[C. clementina × (C. paradisi × C. reticulata)] + C. grandis} × (C. reticulata + P. trifoliata)); UFR-4 (same pedigree as UFR-2); rough lemon (C. jambhiri); sour orange (C. aurantium); and US-897 (C. reticulata × P. trifoliata). Half of the trees on each rootstock were bud-inoculated with CLas and half were inoculated with the asian citrus psyllid [ACP (Diaphorina citri)], which is the CLas vector. During both experiments, no rootstock conferred significantly greater HLB symptom severity compared to trees on Carrizo; however, trees on several rootstocks had reduced HLB severity compared to those on Carrizo. Regarding the bud-inoculated trees after 3 years, trees on UFR-4 displayed greater overall health than trees on Carrizo, Green-7, sour orange, and US897, and trees on UFR-4 had a higher percentage of plants with leaf cycle threshold (Ct) values >36 compared with trees on Cleopatra and rough lemon (62 vs. 26-29 respectively). Regarding the ACP-inoculated trees after 3 years, trees on UFR-4 had better overall health than trees on Carrizo, rough lemon, and US-897, and trees on sour orange had a higher percentage of plants with leaf Ct values greater than 36 only compared to Cleopatra and US-897. The percentage increase in the trunk diameter per month over the course of each entire experiment was significantly greater for UFR-2 in both trials than all rootstocks except UFR-4. Only root CLas titers were sometimes significantly higher for trees on other rootstocks compared to those on Carrizo. Although no rootstock provided acceleration of HLB symptom development compared with Carrizo, some rootstocks conferred significantly greater health compared to Carrizo. However, it is uncertain whether the modest differences in health and growth observed in these greenhouse trials would translate to economic benefits in the field.

Full access

Milica Ćalović, Chunxian Chen, Qibin Yu, Vladimir Orbović, Frederick G. Gmitter Jr, and Jude W. Grosser

Six mandarin cultivars, Ponkan (Citrus reticulata), Willowleaf (Citrus deliciosa), Kinnow (Citrus nobilis × C. deliciosa), Murcott (purported C. reticulata × Citrus sinensis), W. Murcott [purported (C. reticulata × C. sinensis) × C. reticulata)], and Snack (purported C. reticulata hybrid), were used in protoplast fusion with different parental combinations to generate somatic hybrids. Sixty-five somatic regenerants were obtained using optimized formulation of enzymes and molecular weight of polyethylene glycol for improved protoplast yield and heterokaryon fusion rate, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to determine the ploidy level of somatic regenerants, and nuclear expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers to determine their parental source. Of the 65 somatic regenerants, 46 were identified as autotetraploids, 18 allotetraploids, and one undefined. The EST-SSR markers also revealed that some ‘W. Murcott’ embryogenic callus lines that were presumed to be of nucellar origin were actually derived unexpectedly from individual ovules of zygotic origin. These mandarin-derived tetraploids are valuable as potential breeding parents for interploid crosses with an aim at seedlessness and easy-peeling traits.

Free access

Jude W. Grosser, Frederick G. Gmitter Jr., E.S. Louzada, and J.L. Chandler

Allotetraploid somatic hybrid plants of `Nova' tangelo [a sexual hybrid of `Clementine mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco) × `Orlando' tangelo (C. reticulata × C. paradisi Macf.)] + `Succari' sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osbeck), and `Hamlin' sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) + `Dancy' tangerine (C. reticulata) were regenerated following protoplast fusion. `Nova' and `Hamlin' protoplasts were isolated from ovule-derived embryogenic callus and suspension cultures, respectively, and fused using a polyethylene glycol method with seedling leaf-derived protoplasts of `Succari' and `Dancy', respectively. Plants were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis, and somatic hybrids were identified on the basis of leaf morphology, root-tip cell chromosome number, and electrophoretic analysis of peroxidase and phosphoglucose mutase isozyme banding patterns. Diploid plants were regenerated from unfused protoplasts of `Hamlin', `Nova', and `Succari'. Tetraploid plants of `Hamlin' and `Succari' were also recovered, apparently resulting from homokaryotic fusions. No `Dancy' plants were recovered. The somatic hybrid and autotetraploid plants can be used for interploid hybridization with selected monoembryonic scions to generate improved seedless triploid tangor/tangelo cultivars. The lack of suitable tetraploid breeding parents has previously inhibited the development of quality seedless cultivars by this method.

Free access

Ahmad A. Omar, Wen-Yuan Song, James H. Graham, and Jude W. Grosser

Citrus canker disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri is becoming a worldwide problem. Xa21 gene is a member of the Xa21 gene family of rice, which provides broad spectrum Xanthomonas resistance in rice. `Hamlin' sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) is one of the leading commercial cultivars in Florida because of its high yield potential and early maturity. `Hamlin' also has a high regeneration capacity from protoplasts and is often used in transformation experiments. Since the citrus canker pathogen is in the same genus, this gene may have potential to function against canker in citrus. The wild-type Xa21 gene contains an intron, and there are some questions whether dicot plants can process genes containing monocot introns (the cDNA is intron-free). Plasmids DNA, encoding the non-destructive selectable marker EGFP (Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein) gene and the cDNA of the Xa21 gene were transformed or co-transformed into `Hamlin' orange protoplasts using polyethylene glycol. More than 200 transgenic embryoids were recovered. More than 400 transgenic plants were developed from 75 independent transgenic events. PCR analysis revealed the presence of the cDNA of the Xa21 and the GFP genes in the transgenic plants. Some of the plants have the GFP only. Southern analysis is showing integration of the cDNA into different sites ranges from one to five sites. Western analysis is showing the expression of the cDNA of the Xa21 gene in the transgenic citrus plants. This is the first time that a gene from rice has been stably integrated and expressed in citrus plants. Canker challenge assay is in progress.

Free access

Francisco A. A. Mourão Fo, Jude W. Grosser, and Frederick G. Gmitter Jr.

Protoplast culture following polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion resulted in the regeneration of somatic hybrid plants from the following combinations: `Succari' sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) + `Ponkan' mandarin (C. reticulata Blanco), `Succari' sweet orange + `Dancy' mandarin (C. reticulata), `Succari' sweet orange + `Page' tangelo [a sexual hybrid between `Minneola' tangelo (C. reticulata × C. paradisi Mcf.) × `Clementine' mandarin (C. reticulata)], `Valencia' sweet orange (C. sinensis) + `Page' tangelo. `Succari' and `Valencia' protoplasts were isolated -from ovule-derived embryogenic cell suspension cultures and from seedling leaves for the other parents. Somatic hybrid plants were Identified on the basis of leaf morphology and electrophoretic analysis of isozyme banding patterns. Root tip cell chromosome counting is being performed on all plants. Other putative somatic hybrids Include: `Succari' sweet orange + `Minneola' tangelo; `Succari' sweet orange + `Murcott' tangos (C. sinensis × C. reticulata); `Valencia' sweet orange + `Murcott' tangor; and `Valencia' sweet orange + `Dancy' mandarin. These plants may have direct cultivar potential, but there primary use will be for interploid hybridization with selected monoembryonic scions to produce improved seedless triploids.

Free access

Francisco A. A. Mourão Fo, Jude W. Grosser, and Frederick G. Gmitter Jr.

Protoplast culture following polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion resulted in the regeneration of somatic hybrid plants from the following combinations: `Succari' sweet orange (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) + Severinia disticha; `Hamlin' sweet orange (C. sinensisj + S. disticha: `Valencia' sweet orange (C. sinesis) + S. disticha; `Nova' tangelo (C. reticulata hybrid) + S. disticha; `Succari' sweet orange + S. buxifolia; `Nova' tangelo + Citropsis gilletiana; and `Succari' sweet orange + Atlantia ceylanica. `Succari', `Hamlin', `Valencia', and `Nova' protoplasts were Isolated from ovule-derived embryogenic callus and/or suspension cultures whereas protoplasts of S. disticha, S. buxifolia, C. gilletiana, and A. ceylanica were isolated from leaves of potted trees in a greenhouse. Plants were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis and somatic hybrids were identified on the basis of leaf morphology. Electrophoretic analysis of isozyme banding patterns and root tip chromosome counts are being performed. Somatic hybrids with S. disticha are apparently weak whereas the other somatic hybrid plants with S. buxifolia, C. gilletiana, and A. ceylanica exhibit adequate vigor. These are more examples that the the techique of protoplast fusion can be an important tool in overcoming barriers to hybridization of sexually incompatible species.

Free access

William S. Castle, Kim D. Bowman, James C. Baldwin, Jude W. Grosser, and Frederick G. Gmitter Jr.

Two adjacent rootstock trials were conducted in the east coast Indian River region of Florida with ‘Marsh’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) scion. The objective was to find rootstocks to replace sour orange (C. aurantium L.) because of losses to citrus tristeza virus, and to replace Swingle citrumelo [C. paradisi × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] because of its limited usefulness in certain poorly drained coastal sites. The trials were conducted in randomized complete blocks with 12 single-tree replicates spaced 4.6 × 6.9 m. The soils were of the Wabasso and Riviera series. The first trial consisted largely of trees on citrange [C. sinensis (L.) Osb. × P. trifoliata] and citrumelo rootstocks, ‘Cipo’ sweet orange (C. sinensis), and various hybrid rootstocks. The second trial involved mandarin rootstocks (C. reticulata Blanco) and sour orange and related rootstocks. Trees were grown for 7 years and yield and juice quality data were collected for the last 4 years of that period. Those rootstocks identified as the most promising, based on combinations of smaller tree size and high productivity and juice quality, were two Sunki mandarin × Swingle trifoliate orange (TF) hybrids (C-54, C-146), a Sunki mandarin × Flying Dragon TF hybrid, C-35 citrange, and a Cleopatra mandarin × Rubidoux TF hybrid (×639). The trees on these five rootstocks cropped well leading to soluble solids (SS) values of 3000 to 4000 kg/ha when they were 7-years old. The trees on C-54 and C-146 were relatively large, somewhat taller than trees on sour orange, whereas those on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid were smaller and similar to sour orange in tree height. Fruit quality among the trees on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid had relatively high SS concentration (better than sour orange), and the other three rootstocks had relatively lower solids concentration (poorer than sour orange). The trees on C-35 and the Sunki × Flying Dragon hybrid would be good candidates for higher density orchards.