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Jinggui Fang, Chih Cheng Chao, Richard J. Henny, and Jianjun Chen

Plant tissue culture can induce a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in regenerated plantlets, a phenomenon known as somaclonal variation. Such variation has been widely used in the ornamental foliage plant industry as a source for selection of new cultivars. In ornamental aroids alone, at least 63 somaclonal-derived cultivars have been released. In addition to morphological differences, many somaclonal aroid cultivars can be distinguished by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. However, a few cultivars have no detectable polymorphisms with their parents or close relatives by AFLP fingerprints. It is postulated that DNA methylation may be involved in the morphological changes of these cultivars. In this study, methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) technique was used to study DNA methylation in selected somaclonal cultivars of Alocasia, Aglaonema, Anthurium, Dieffenbachia, Philodendron, and Syngonium. Results showed that polymorphisms were detected in the somaclonal cultivars, suggesting that DNA methylation polymorphisms may associate with tissue culture-induced mutation in ornamental aroids. This is the first study of methylation variation in somaclonal variants of ornamental foliage plants. The results clearly demonstrate that the MSAP technique is highly efficient in detecting DNA methylation events in somaclonal-derived cultivars.

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Zhanao Deng and Brent K. Harbaugh

Caladiums ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are tropical ornamental aroids. They are often forced as potted plants and grown in the landscape to provide color ( Evans et al., 1992 ). A great majority of caladium plants in the

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Zhe Cao, Shunzhao Sui, Qian Yang, and Zhanao Deng

Cultivated caladium is an ornamental aroid produced for container or hanging basket plants or grown in landscapes for their variably shaped, colorful foliage. The ornamental value of caladium plants, to a great extent, depends on their leaf

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Zhanao Deng, Natalia A. Peres, and Johan Desaeger

Caladium ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) is an ornamental aroid often grown in containers or planted in the landscape as accent and border plants ( Deng, 2018 ; Evans et al., 1992 ). Caladium plants are valued for their variably

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Zhanao Deng, Natalia A. Peres, and Johan Desaeger

Caladiums ( Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are ornamental aroids often used as container or landscape plants ( Evans et al., 1992 ). They are valued for their variably shaped, bright foliage. Most commercial caladium plants are

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Zhanao Deng, Fahrettin Goktepe, and Brent K. Harbaugh

Caladiums are ornamental aroids widely grown as pot plants or used in landscapes as accent or border plants. Commercial pot caladium plants are produced by forcing tubers, while dry tubers are available for garden or landscape planting ( Evans et

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Zhanao Deng, Brent K. Harbaugh, and Natalia A. Peres

Caladiums (Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are valued for their colorful and variably shaped leaves (Harbaugh and Tjia, 1985; Wilfret, 1993). Commercial caladium cultivars generally are grouped into the fancy- or lance-leaved type (Wilfret, 1986). Fancy-leaved caladiums produce large round-ovate to triangular leaves with three main veins, two large basal lobes partially to fully joined, and a petiole attached to the back of the leaf blade. Lance-leaved caladiums produce leaves that are sagittate to cordate-lanceolate and have basal lobes obvious to barely obvious and petioles attached to the base of

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Zhanao Deng, Brent K. Harbaugh, and Natalia A. Peres

Cultivated caladiums (Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are valued for their colorful and variable-shaped leaves (Harbaugh and Tjia, 1985; Wilfret, 1993). Cultivars generally are divided into three groups according to leaf shape and size: fancy-, lance-, and strap-leaved (Wilfret, 1986). Fancy-leaved caladiums produce large round–ovate to triangular leaves with three main veins, two large basal lobes partially to fully joined, and a petiole attached to the back of the leaf blade. Strap-leaved caladiums have linear leaves with one main vein and no obvious basal lobes. Lance-leaved caladiums produce leaves intermediate between fancy

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Zhanao Deng and Natalia A. Peres

Caladiums (Caladium ×hortulanum Birdsey, Araceae Juss.) are often grown in containers or planted in the landscape as accent and border plants (Deng, 2018; Evans et al., 1992). They are valued for their variable-shaped, bright foliage. The majority of commercial caladium plants sold at retail are produced by forcing tubers in containers. Florida field growers produce essentially all the caladium tubers used in the United States and some 40 countries in the world for the production of pot plants and direct planting in the landscapes. Commercial caladium cultivars are often grouped into eight categories based

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Teresa E. Seijo, Natalia A. Peres, and Zhanao Deng

Caladium ( Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey) is an ornamental aroid grown as landscape and potted plants. They are valued for their colorful foliage that comes in various leaf shapes and coloration patterns containing shades of red, pink, white