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Abstract

Seven herbicides, alone or in combinations, were tested for weed control on watermelon, Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai cv. Charleston Gray, and cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. cv. Chipper, during 1967 to 1972. Preemergence applications of nitralin (4-(methylsulfonyl)-2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropylaniline) controlled most weed species without seriously injuring either crop. The combination of bensulide (O,O-diisopropyl phosphorodithioate S-ester with N-(2-mercaptoethyl) benzenesulfonamide) with either chloramben, methyl ester (methyl 3-amino-2,5-dichlorobenzoate) or naptalam (N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid) controlled a broader spectrum of weeds than any of the compounds applied singly.

Open Access

Abstract

A number of pre-emergence soil residual herbicides were tested at 2 locations on varieties of young peach, plum, cherry, pear and walnut rootstocks. The greatest variation in response resulted from differences in location. Important differences in varietal response were also obtained with the various herbicides in light soils. Simazine appeared sufficiently safe to trees in heavier soil but gave variable weed control. Diuron gave about the same degree of weed control but more safety than simazine on young trees. Of the uracil herbicides tested, DP-733 was the least toxic to the fruit tree species tested, while bromacil and isocil were generally the most toxic, except to peach trees. Of the commercial uracil herbicides, only DP-732 (terbacil) was of sufficient interest for further study.

Open Access

Abstract

Field studies were conducted in 1983 and 1984 to evaluate the feasibility of growing fresh-market tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. ‘Floradade’) in no-tillage or conventional tillage systems and to evaluate the efficacy of postemergence herbicides under both tillage systems. In 1983, marketable fruit yields in no-tillage were nearly twice those from conventional tillage. In 1984, there were no statistical differences in marketable yields among herbicide treatments or between tillage systems. Yields were higher in 1984 than in 1983, largely due to more favorable growing conditions. In both years, metribuzin provided good broadleaf weed control. In 1983, annual grasses were better controlled in no-tillage with a sequential metribuzin application for fluazifop following metribuzin than with a single metribuzin application. Marketable yields were highest in plots where annual grasses were adequately controlled. Sequential metribuzin applications provided good broadleaf weed control and postemergence grass herbicides each provided excellent annual grass control in 1984. Chemical names used: (±)-2-[4-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy]phenoxy]propanoic acid (fluazifop); 4-amino-6-(1,1-diemthylethyl)-3-(methyIthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one (metribuzin).

Open Access

Abstract

Midsummer grapehoeing following spring application of diuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] or simazine [2-chloro-4,6-bis(ethylamino)-s-triazine] plus paraquat (1,1’-dimethyl-4,4’-bipyridinium ion) adequately controlled weeds growing in grapes (Vitis labrusca L.). When grapehoeing was used to control grape root borer [(Vitacea polistiformis Harris) lower initial rates of preemergence herbicide could be used. An additional half-rate of herbicide was required after grapehoeing to maintain weed control through the fall. Plots not grapehoed were almost completely weed free following a glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] treatment. Injury to grapes the following spring was associated with fall glyphosate applications where low hanging foliage, that had not been removed, intercepted the spray. Glyphosate was most effective and paraquat more effective than dinoseb (2-sec-buty1-4,6-dinitrophenol) plus diesel fuel for postemergence control of weeds in grapes. Preemergence herbicides, napropamide [2-(α-naphthoxy)-N,N-diethylpropionamide], norflurazon [4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-(α,α,α-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H)-pyridazinone], oxadiazon [2-tert-buty1-4-(2,4-dichloro-5-isopropoxyphenyl)-∆2-l,3,4-oxadiazolin-5-one], oryzalin (3,5-dinitro-N 4,N 4-dipropylsulfanilamide), and oxyfluorfen [2-chloro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene], were effective as residual type treatments.

Open Access

Yields and economic returns above treatment variable costs were determined for young `Desirable' pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch] trees grown for nine seasons under ten combinations of orchard floor management practice and irrigation. Orchard floor management practices were 1) no weed control, 2) mowed, 3) total weed control with herbicides, 4) grass control only with herbicides, or 5) disking, and trees were either irrigated or nonirrigated. Total weed control with herbicides increased cumulative yield through the ninth growing season by 358% compared to no weed control. In the humid environment where this experiment was conducted, irrigation did not increase crop value obtained from the young trees, except for 1 year. At the end of the ninth season, total weed control with herbicides was the only treatment to have a positive net present value. These data indicate that establishment costs for young `Desirable' pecan trees can be recovered as early as the eighth growing season if competition from weeds is totally eliminated.

Free access

The herbicides paraquat, trifluralin, and metolachlor were compared for efficacy of weed control in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] with and without cultivation as a supplemental strategy. Herbicides also were compared against a no cultivation-no herbicide treatment (control) and against cultivation without an herbicide. Cultivation had no significant effect on seed yield, biological yield, or harvest index of cowpea. Paraquat, applied before seeding but after emergence of weeds, was ineffective for weed control and usually did not change cowpea yield from that obtained without an herbicide. Trifluralin and metolachlor more than tripled cowpea seed yield compared with that obtained without an herbicide in 1988, when potential weed pressure was 886 g·m-2 (dry weight). The main effects of trifluralin and metolachlor were not significant for cowpea seed yield in 1989, when potential weed pressure was 319 g·m-2 (dry weight). However, in 1989, these two herbicides still increased cowpea seed yield compared with that of the control and increased net farm income by more than $300/ha compared with the income obtained from the control. Chemical names used 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4' -bipyridlnium salts (paraquat); 2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzenamine (trifluralin); 2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6 -methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-l-methylethyl) acetamide (metolachlor).

Free access

Micropropagated (MP) raspberries (Rubus idaeus L. var. idaeus) are sensitive to moisture and temperature extremes and to certain preemergent herbicides used at transplanting. We examined fertilizer placement and row covers in conjunction with various weed management strategies to identify beneficial practices for newly planted, MP primocane-fruiting `Heritage' raspberries. Uncontrolled weed growth during plant establishment inhibited raspberry cane growth and production into the second and third growing seasons. Handweeding and herbicide treatments successfully controlled weeds, but soil moisture was apparently insufficient for optimum growth of the MP raspberries when these treatments were imposed, even with normal rainfall in early summer and drip irrigation in late summer. Polyethylene and straw mulches during the establishment year provided both weed control and adequate soil moisture, resulting in more cane growth in the first and 2nd year, and higher yields the 2nd year. Primocane density after the third growing season still was influenced by first-year weed management practices. Raspberry plants responded best to straw mulch without row covers as plant growth was better in both years. Canes were thicker, yields were higher, and a larger portion of the total crop was harvested early. Row covers were beneficial only in bare-soil treatments, and method of fertilizer placement had no effect on any measured variable. Mulching newly transplanted MP raspberries is an alternative to herbicide use that also provides physiological benefits to the plant through microclimate modification.

Free access

The postemergence-active herbicides lactofen, fomesafen, and acifluorfen were applied to established matted-row strawberry plants (Fragaria × ananassa) and evaluated for broadleaf weed control and foliar phytotoxicity. Strawberries were evaluated for yield and fruit quality. Treatments were applied following June renovation. All herbicide treatments resulted in acceptable control of broadleaf weeds present at the time of application; however, sicklepod (Cassia obtusifolia) germinated after herbicide application. All treatments caused foliar injury within 3 days after application. No injury symptoms were evident 21 days after treatment due to new foliage development. Fomesafen and acifluorfen were the only herbicides to suppress runner count. Yields the following year were not reduced by herbicide treatments. Chemical names used: (±)-2-ethoxy-l-methy1-2-oxoethyl 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl) phenoxy]-2-nitrobenzate (lactofen); 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy] -N -(methylsu1fonyl)-2-nitrobenzamide (fomesafen); 5-[2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]-2-nitrobenzoic acid (acifluorfen).

Free access

Abstract

Five field experiments compared weed control systems for snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in 25-cm rows including herbicides, but no cultivation, to systems for conventional 91-cm rows including both herbicides and cultivation. Herbicide combinations of EPTC + dinoseb each at 3.4 kg/ha, EPTC at 3.4 kg/ha + bentazon at 0.8 kg/ha, and trifluralin at 0.6 kg/ha + bentazon at 0.8 kg/ha provided excellent control of annual weeds and yellow nutsedge in most experiments. With the most effective herbicide treatments, weed control was similar in 25-cm and 91-cm rows. However, when herbicide treatments failed to control all weed species, weed control in 91-cm rows was better than that in 25-cm rows, because 91-cm rows were cultivated. Snap beans in 25-cm rows yielded an average of 25% higher than snap beans in 91-cm rows (plant density was equivalent at both row spacings). As weed control improved, the magnitude of the yield difference between 25-cm and 91-cm row spacings increased.

Open Access

Abstract

Five weed-control treatments (unweeded; hand-weeded; bensulide and naptalam; bensulide, naptalam, and paraquat; black polyethylene mulch) were combined factorially with three row-cover treatments (no cover, spun-bonded polyester, highly perforated polyethylene) in a 2-year experiment. Slicing cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) were transplanted 26 (1985) or 23 (1986) days after application of the bensulide-naptalam. This combination of herbicides provided weed control for up to 4 weeks after transplanting, but was less effective in 1986 than in 1985. Row covers reduced herbicide efficacy. Spraying paraquat through the covers 2 to 3 days before setting transplants significantly improved weed control and cucumber yield. Soil crusting was reduced, and earliness and total yield were enhanced by mulch and row covers. Greatest yields and estimated net economic return in both years occurred with row covers with mulch followed by mulch alone in 1986 and by mulch alone or hand-weeding with row covers in 1985. Weed control, earliness, and yield were not affected significantly by type of row cover in either year. Chemical names used: O,O-bis(1-methylethyl)-S-[2-(phenylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]phosphorodithioate (bensulide); 2-[(1-napthalenylamino)carbonyl]benzoic acid (naptalam); 1,1′-dimethyl-4,4′-bipyridinium salts (paraquat).

Open Access