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Michael T. Deaton and David W. Williams

temperature regimes representing potential seeding dates in Lexington, KY. Materials and methods Germination studies were conducted in the Turfgrass Science Laboratory on the University of Kentucky campus in 2011. Nineteen commercially available cultivars were

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Chen-Yu Lin, Kan-Shu Chen, Hsuan-Ping Chen, Hsiang-I Lee, and Ching-Hsiang Hsieh

suitable environmental conditions and then begin flowering ( Labate et al., 2006 ). However, unsuitable temperatures produce malformed curds, such as buttoning curds, riceyness curds, or bolting in the small plant stage. Fernández et al. (1997) indicated

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Martin Makgose Maboko, Isa Bertling, and Christian Phillipus Du Plooy

cultivation medium. The recent more common occurrence of unfavorable weather conditions such as large rainfall and temperature fluctuations have resulted in the search for other means to optimize yield and quality of tomatoes. Amongst these is the use of

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Arnon Dag, Smadar Boim, Yulya Sobotin, and Isaac Zipori

important to balance the rates of harvest with those of oil extraction in the mill. The objective of the current work was to evaluate the effect of storage temperatures and duration on extracted oil quality from commercial, mechanically harvested orchards

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E. V. Parups

Abstract

Twenty-six cultivars of chrysanthemum (Chrusanthemum morifolium Ramat.) of the standard, pot-, or spray- type were grown in greenhouses at an 8 hour short-day and a night temperature of either 15.S°C, or a split temperature of 15.5° from 1600 until 2400 and 10° from 2400 until 0800, The day temperature was kept at 22° on sunny and 18° on cloudy days. Additional light (about 3000 lx) was provided for one half of the plants in each temperature treatment on cloudy days. Good chrysanthemums were produced under all conditions with all cultivars with but a minor delay (about 3 days) at the split high-low night temperatures. The plants were taller when grown at the split cool rather than the normal night temperature. The number and size of flowers were not affected significantly by the temperature treatments. Additional light increased stem length and increased the number of flowers of the spray-, and pot-type chrysanthemums. In the growth and production of greenhouse-grown chrysanthemums the split, cool temperature treatments provide energy savings without a noticeable change in growth and quality of plants.

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Luisa Dalla Costa, Nicola Tomasi, Stefano Gottardi, Francesco Iacuzzo, Giovanni Cortella, Lara Manzocco, Roberto Pinton, Tanja Mimmo, and Stefano Cesco

It is well known that soil temperature changes have a significant impact on the growth and development of plants both in agricultural and native ecosystems ( Bonan, 1992 ). During plant growth, optimum temperature is required below- and aboveground

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Charles F. Forney

cranberry fruit are not clearly defined. In various handbooks published in the past 20 years, recommended storage temperatures range from 2 to 7 °C ( Hardenburg et al., 1986 ; Kader, 1997 ; Kasmire and Thompson, 1992 ; Lidster et al., 1988 ; Prange, 2004

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Chikako Honda, Hideo Bessho, Mari Murai, Hiroshi Iwanami, Shigeki Moriya, Kazuyuki Abe, Masato Wada, Yuki Moriya-Tanaka, Hiroko Hayama, and Miho Tatsuki

a , 2012 ; Iglesias and Echeverría, 2009 ). Anthocyanin synthesis in the fruit skin of red cultivars is affected by external biotic and abiotic factors, including nutrients, water stress, wounding, light, and temperature ( Ubi, 2004 ). The effect

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Harry W. Janes and Richard McAvoy

Abstract

Poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. cv. Annette Hegg Brilliant Diamond) were grown in separate greenhouses, one in which the night air temperature was maintained at 16.7°C and another where the air temperature was allowed to fall to 11.5°. The cool-air-treated plants were subjected to root-zone temperatures of 17°, 23°, 26°, and 29°. In general, the deleterious effects of cool air temperatures could be reversed by root-zone warming at 23°.

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Rhoda L. Burrows, Luther Waters Jr., and Albert H. Markhart III

Abstract

Three- to 4-month-old seedlings of an improved selection of Asparagus officinalis L. cv. Mary Washington were artificially hardened and crowns subjected to controlled freezing tests. Two low-temperature acclimation regimes were used. The first was 3C for 0, 1, or 2 weeks before freezing at 0, −5, or − 10C; the second, 3C for 0, 1.5, or 3 weeks, followed by freezing at 0, −2.5, −4.5, −6.5, or −8.5C. Regrowth tests showed that hardiness increased with 2 and 3 weeks of acclimation, with tolerance to −5 and −6.5C, respectively. Water-stressed seedlings (relative water content at 57%) withstood exposure to −5C, but not to −6.5C; rehydrated crowns and well-watered controls were hardy to −3.5C.