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application rates for use in field-grown tree liner production. In response to an onset of pest infestations, liner spray applicators must make calculated decisions within a very narrow time window on how much pesticide and spray volume will be needed for

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maps for future site-specific applications of agrochemicals. Real-time SSM generally does not need GPS data because decisions about agrochemical rates and crop target are made on the spot at the time of the measurement. Prescription map SSM needs GPS

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, branches develop, fruit form, and crops are harvested. Each phenophase has variable intra and interseasonal canopy development that requires variable-rate pesticide applications for maximal application efficiency ( Chen et al., 2013a ; Gil and Escolà, 2009

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-ground production system ( Westerveld et al., 2003 ). However, research conducted in Florida using plasticulture systems have shown increased yields with N application rates more than 357 lb/acre N for high-population (31,376 plants/acre) plantings ( Barrett et al

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knowledge, there is no report about the effect of seaweed extracts on the postharvest life of bedding plants and vegetable transplants. Different plant species can have different responses to the application methods and rates of seaweed concentrate ( Khan et

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, tomato varieties, soil and irrigation types, with allowances for supplemental N applications ( Olson et al., 2011 ). Growers typically follow UF/IFAS irrigation recommendations, but use N fertilizer rates greater than the UF/IFAS recommendation

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an increase in the rate of shoot formation from crowns of ‘Tifton 85’ common bermudagrass treated with EP. Most information on PGRs is related to field applications for biomass reduction, and little is known about stolon growth regulation in pot

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Ilex vomitoria Ait. `Nana' root and-shoot growth increased as rate of fertilizer applied from a 6N-1P-3K solution increased from 0.5 to 2.5 g N/3-liter container during a 26-week experiment. Percentage of applied N, P, and Kin the plant and growth medium decreased as N applied increased. Dividing the fertilizer among one, two, or four applications per week resulted in similar use of applied N, P, and K. Shoot dry weights for the 0.5 g N/container treatment were less than for the Osmocote (18N-2.6P-10K) treatment (2.5 g N/container), but the percentage of applied N, P, and K in the plant and growth medium (55%, 42%, and 75%, respectively) was greater than for the Osmocote treatment (31%, 15%, and 27%, respectively).

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application rate above ETc (gray bar above the curve) represents the risk of deep water percolation and loss. 1 gal/100 ft = 0.1242 L·m −1 ; 1 inch = 2.54 cm. Water can be applied slowly ( Fig. 1B and C ) by using emitters with low FRs (<15 gal/100 ft per hour

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`Dark Red Annette Hegg' poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) were grown in a 1 peat : 1 perlite : 1 vermiculite medium using a pinched production schedule with varying N and S fertilizer application rates. Fifty-six treatments consisting of eight N levels (100 to 275 mg·L−1 in 25-mg·L−1 increments) and seven S levels (0 to 75 mg·L−1 in 12.5-mg·L−1 increments) were supplied. Other required nutrients were supplied at commercial recommendations for all treatments. Foliage of each plant was evaluated quantitatively by chromometer readings every 3 weeks. Marketability was determined by sensory evaluations from commercial producers, retailers, and consumers. Results indicated distinct color differences (hue, chroma, value) between S levels of 0 and 12.5 mg·L−1 and a slight difference between S at 12.5 and 25 mg·L−1. The foliage of plants receiving 0 S was lighter, more vivid, and more yellow-green in color. As N levels increased, there was a linear response; foliage became more green, darker, and more dull. Commerical and consumer evaluators rated plants that received S at 0 or 12.5 mg·L−1 at all N levels and plants receiving N at 100 mg L−1 as unmarketable. This research indicates that `Annette Hegg' poinsettia requires S at a minimum of 25 mg·L−1 and N at a minimum of 125 mg·L−1 for commercial acceptance, and commercial N application rates may be greatly reduced when adequate S is supplied.

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