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Toshio Hanada, Kyoko Fukuta, Hisayo Yamane, Tomoya Esumi, Ryutaro Tao, Thomas M. Gradziel, Abhaya M. Dandekar, Ángel Fernández i Martí, José M. Alonso, and Rafel Socias i Company

cultivated plants Springer-Verlag Berlin, Germany Grasselly, C. Olivier, G. 1976 Mise en évidence de quelques types autocompatibles parmi les cultivars d'amandier ( P. amygdalus Batsch) de la population des Pouilles Ann. Amélior. Plant. 26 107 113 Hanada, T

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Àngel Fernández i Martí, José M. Alonso, María T. Espiau, María J. Rubio-Cabetas, and Rafel Socias i Company

Almond { Prunus amygdalus [syn. P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb]} is a species in the Rosaceae family with a genome 2n = 16. The almond is the most important tree nut crop in terms of production and is one of the most polymorphic fruit species

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Ossama Kodad, Rafel Socias i Company, Ana Sánchez, and M. Margarida Oliveira

Pollen source effect on pollen tube growth in advanced self-compatible almond selections ( Prunus amygdalus Batsch) Adv. Hort. Sci. 20 256 261 Kodad, O. Socias i Company, R. 2008 Fruit set evaluation for self

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Álvaro Fernández-Cuesta, Ossama Kodad, Rafel Socias i Company, and Leonardo Velasco

fatty acid composition in almond ( Prunus amygdalus Batsch) and its relationship with kernel quality J. Agr. Food Chem. 56 4096 4101 Kodad, O. Socias i Company, R. Prats, M.S. López-Ortiz, M.C. 2006 Variability in tocopherol concentrations in almond oil

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Ossama Kodad, José M. Alonso, María T. Espiau, Gloria Estopañán, Teresa Juan, and Rafel Socias i Company

Kodad, O. Socias i Company, R. 2008 Variability of oil content and of major fatty acid composition in almond ( Prunus amygdalus Batsch) and its relationship with kernel quality J. Agr. Food Chem. 56 4096 4101 Kodad, O. Socias i Company, R. Gracia Gómez

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J.L. Espada and A.J. Felipe

Group-author : R. Socias i Company

Low levels of fruit set were measured in a commercial almond [Prunus amygdalus Batsch, syn. Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] orchard during 3 years. Low sets may be attributed mostly to orchard design, as cultivars are distributed in contiguous rows where pollen interchange among different cultivars is not facilitated. An appropriate orchard design and proper bee management are essential for commercial yields in self-incompatible almond cultivars.

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P. Martínez-Gómez, S. Arulsekar, D. Potter, and T.M. Gradziel

The genetic relationships among peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], almond [P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb or P. amygdalus (L.) Batsch] and 10 related Prunus species within the subgenus Amygdalus were investigated using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. P. glandulosa Pall. was included as an outgroup. Polymorphic alleles were scored as present or absent for each accession. The number of alleles revealed by the SSR analysis in peach and almond cultivars ranged from one to three whereas related Prunus species showed a range of one to 10 alleles. Results demonstrated an extensive genetic variability within this readily intercrossed germplasm as well as the value of SSR markers developed in one species of Prunus for the characterization of related species. Mean character difference distances were calculated for all pairwise comparisons and were used to construct an unrooted dendogram depicting the phenetic relationships among species. Four main groups were distinguished. Peach cultivars clustered with accessions of P. davidiana (Carr.) Franch. and P. mira Koehne. The second group contained almond cultivars. A third group included accessions of P. argentea (Lam) Rehd., P. bucharica Korschinsky, P. kuramica Korschinsky, P. pedunculata Pall, P. petunikowii Lits., P. tangutica (Spach) Batal., and P. webbii (Spach) Vieh.. P. glandulosa and P. scoparia Batal. were included in a fourth group.

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Nachida Ben-Njima

Group-author : R. Socias i Company

Pollen tube growth was studied in 10 almond [Prunus amygdalus Batsch, syn. P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] selections of the Zaragoza breeding program, whose main objective is the development of self-compatible cultivars. Self-compatibility was evident in eight of the selections, as indicated by the fact that pollen tube growth was similar following self- and cross-pollination. In the other two selections, pollen tube growth differed following self- and cross-pollination, one showing self-incompatibility and the other an irregular progression of crossed pollen tubes. The importance of the style in sustaining pollen tube growth was evident, and pollen tube growth was influenced by style type.

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D. Bernad

Group-author : R. Socias i Company

Bloom evolution and flower quality were studied in 10 almond [Prunus amygdalus Batsch syn. P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] selections of the Zaragoza breeding program. The opening of individual flowers followed a normal distribution, with deviations reflecting temperature differences during the bloom period. The first open flowers are of better quality than later ones and may contribute more to fruit set. The relative stigma–anther position reflected the possibility of natural autogamy in three of the 10 selections. Natural autogamy might allow single-cultivar orchards without the need for pollinating insects.

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Thomas Gradziel, Noreen Mahoney, and Ashraf Abdallah

Genetic differences were observed in levels of aflatoxin production following controlled inoculations of California almonds [Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb, syn. P. amygdalus, Batsch.; P. communis (L.) Arcangeli, non Huds.]. Genetic variation was also observed in kernel oil composition, and in susceptibility to Aspergillus flavus Speare as indicated by rate of mold expansion on the surface of cut kernels. Several almond lines resulting from the introgression of peach [P. persica (L.) Batsch] germplasm had very low aflatoxin levels relative to commercial cultivars tested. Peach-derived almond breeding lines and cultivars also produced some of the highest oil quality as determined by the proportion of oleic acid, and by the oleic to linoleic acid balance. The proportion of linoleic acid to total oil ranged from 16% to almost 30%. No correlations were detected between aflatoxin production in inoculated almond kernels and either kernel oil composition or mold growth rate on injured kernel tissue.