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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

%, or 40%) on measured LF with Podocarpus macrophyllus in 36-cm-diameter containers (Expt. 2). Irrigation rates remained fixed (LF_FX; above) or were adjusted daily based on evapotranspiration rate and rain (LF_ET; bottom) between LF test dates. LF

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B. Dehgan, T.H. Yeager, and F.C. Almira

Photinia ×fraseri Dress and Podocarpus macrophyllus (Thunb.) D. Don were grown in a Metro-Mix 500 medium amended with 0.0%,0.25%,0.5%,0.75%, or 1.0% (by volume) of a K-based hydrophilic polymer and were irrigated every 3,6,9, or 12 days with a solution that contained either 100, 200, 300, or 400 mg N/liter, respectively: Photinia ×fraseri plants irrigated every 6 days with 200 mg N/liter in irrigation water and grown in 0.75 % polymer-amended medium had higher root and shoot dry weights (6.3 and 28 g, respectively) after 144 days than plants grown in the unamended medium (3.4 and 17 g, respectively). Shoot dry weights of P. macrophyllus grown 192 days in the amended medium were similar to those of plants grown in the unamended medium. Average shoot dry weights increased from 10 to 18 g, respectively, as number of irrigations increased from every 12 days with 400 mg N/liter in irrigation water to every 3 days with 100 mg N/liter in irrigation water. Podocarpus macrophyllus root dry weights were 1.9 and 3.6 g for plants irrigated every 12 and 3 days, respectively, while plants grown in the unamended medium had the highest root dry weight (3.2 g). Data from this study indicated that growth response to a cross-linked, K polyacrylate/polyacrylamide, hydrophilic polymer-amended Metro-Mix 500 medium varied with species and number of irrigation and concomitant fertilizer applications.

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S. Christopher Marble, Shawn T. Steed, Debalina Saha, and Yuvraj Khamare

-shaker. A nontreated, nonmulched control was also included for comparison. In Dover, treatments were applied to 15-gal podocarpus, and treatments were applied to 25-gal Chinese elms in Ruskin. At both locations, standard PB:peat substrate mixes were used and

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B. Dehgan, F. C. Almira, and T. H. Yeager

Rooted cuttings of Photinia X fraseri and Podocarpus macrophyllus were grown in Metro-mix 500 amended with 0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, or 1.0% (w/w) Stockosorb 300, a K-based superabsorbent polymer. All 3-liter containers were irrigated with 500 ml of 100, 200, 300, or 400 ppm 20N-8.7P-16.72K Peters fertilizer solution once every 3, 6, 9, or 12 days, respectively. In comparison with the unamended media, P. X fraseri had equal or better growth (shoot and root fresh and dry weights, increased height, and branch and leaf numbers) with 3, 6, and 9 day irrigation in all but the 1 % amended medium. Growth of P. macrophyllus was not noticeably affected by the polymer amendment. This is not unexpected since P. X fraseri is a broad-leaf plant while P. macrophyllus is a slow growing, narrow-leaf conifer. Nitrogen, P, and K tissue levels for Photinia and Podocarpus decreased for the 12 day irrigation treatment regardless of amendment rate. Except for Fe, which was highest at nine day irrigation intervals, micronutrients remained more or less constant in both species. The amended media had a greater water holding capacity at termination of the project (144 and 192 days for Photinia and Podocarpus, respectively) than at the start. Thus, K-based superabsorbents may be used successfully to reduce irrigation frequency.

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S. D. Verkade and G. E. Fitzpatrick

The availability of organic components of potting media is limited due to supply and shipping costs. Disposal of solid waste has also become a serious problem for many municipalities. The utilization of solid waste compost in agricultural production promises to be a solution for both concerns. The objective of this experiment was to determine the efficacy of sol id waste compost from Miami, Dade County, Florida as a propagation medium for vegetative reproduction of ornamental and landscape plants.

Cuttings of Podocarpus macrophylla, Chrysobalanus icaro, and Impatiens spp. 1-13 cm long, treated with .2% NAA ppm IBA were rooted in media composed of sphagnum peatmoss: perlite (1:1) or Agrisoil (TM) solid waste compost: perlite (1:). Cutting rooted well in both media. Data included number of roots and root weight.

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S. D. Verkade and G. E. Fitzpatrick

The availability of organic components of potting media is limited due to supply and shipping costs. Disposal of solid waste has also become a serious problem for many municipalities. The utilization of solid waste compost in agricultural production promises to be a solution for both concerns. The objective of this experiment was to determine the efficacy of sol id waste compost from Miami, Dade County, Florida as a propagation medium for vegetative reproduction of ornamental and landscape plants.

Cuttings of Podocarpus macrophylla, Chrysobalanus icaro, and Impatiens spp. 1-13 cm long, treated with .2% NAA ppm IBA were rooted in media composed of sphagnum peatmoss: perlite (1:1) or Agrisoil (TM) solid waste compost: perlite (1:). Cutting rooted well in both media. Data included number of roots and root weight.

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Sandra B. Wilson, Keona L. Muller, Judith A. Gersony, and Brian T. Scully

Pierce. Elevation view (top) corresponds to plan view (bottom), consisting of red maple ( Acer rubrum ), podocarpus ( Podocarpus macrophyllus ), ruby fringe bush ( Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum ), snow on the mountain ( Breynia disticha ), dwarf snow

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Robert H. Stamps

.” On the other hand, well-established and durable products commonly used by florists such as Alexandrian laurel, podocarpus, ruscus and salal are relegated to the “worth trying” chapter. In both chapters, USDA hardiness zone information is provided for

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Jeff B. Million and Thomas H. Yeager

), Ilex vomitoria Aiton ‘Nana’ (Dwarf Yaupon), Jasminum multiflorum (Burm. f.) Andrews (Downy Jasmine), Juniperus chinensis L. ‘Parsonii’ (Parson’s Juniper), Ligustrum japonicum Thunb. (Waxleaf Ligustrum), Podocarpus macrophyllus Thunb

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Svoboda V. Pennisi and Marc W. van Iersel

,672 g, of which 39,312 g (92%) was contributed by just a few woody plants (4.6-m and 3.7-m F. benjamina , 3-m Ficus ‘Alii’, 1.2-m Podocarpus , and 2.4-m Dracaena reflexa ) ( Table 5 ). In general, within a particular species, the biomass that was