Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "vegetable breeding" x
  • HortTechnology x
Clear All

Salted and sweet watermelon rind pickles are commonly produced in North America, Europe, and Asia using traditional recipes. Homeowners and small industries use the leftover watermelon crop, especially from cultivars having thick and crisp rind, to produce pickles. Recently, we classified rind thickness for a set of obsolete and heirloom cultivars used by home gardeners and heirloom collectors in the United States. In this study, we used elite cultivars for growers interested in high yield, fruit quality, adaptability, and disease resistance. The objective of this study was to classify modern cultivars (nine inbreds and 103 F1 hybrids) of watermelons available to growers for use in production of watermelon rind pickles. Based on the data, cultivars were divided into three groups of rind thickness and categorized according to pedigree (inbred or F1 hybrid), fruit type (seeded or seedless), and flesh color (red, orange, or yellow). Most of the cultivars tested (109 of 112) had rind thicker than 10 mm and could be used for pickle production.

Full access

The construction of a single-fruit seed extractor for cucumber is described. It increases the speed and ease of removing seeds from individual, mature cucumbers for later drying and planting. The machine saves about 47 seconds/fruit compared to hand methods and is suited to handling single fruit (or batches of up to 50) by researchers needing seeds from controlled pollinations. In 5 years of use, no reduction in seed recovery or germination has been observed using the seed extractor relative to hand harvest.

Full access
Author:

Burpless cucumbers are listed in many seed catalogs as being milder in taste (or easier on the digestion) than the american slicing type. It has been suggested by researchers that burpless cucumbers 1) contain less of a burp-causing compound, 2) are genetically bitterfree, or 3) are just the marketing term for oriental trellis cucumbers sold in the U.S. The objective of this experiment was to determine whether oriental trellis cucumbers cause less burping when eaten, and whether they are genetically bitterfree. An american slicer (`Marketmore 76'), a bitterfree slicer (`Marketmore 80'), and a burpless oriental trellis slicer (`Tasty Bright') were compared. Burpiness of the fruit was determined in the field in two seasons (spring and summer) and two replications. Six judges were grouped into burp-susceptible and burp-resistant. They evaluated the cultivars over two harvests by eating a 4-inch (100-mm) length of one fruit of the three cultivars (in random order) on three consecutive days. Burpiness was rated 0 to 9 (0 = none, 1 to 3 = slight, 4 to 6 = moderate, 7 to 9 = severe). Bitterness of the plants was determined (using different judges) by tasting one cotyledon of six seedlings per cultivar. Cotyledon bitterness is an indicator of plant bitterness; bitterfree plants lack cucurbitacins, and have mild-tasting fruit. Results of taste tests indicated that burpiness ratings were not significantly differentfor burp resistant judges. However, oriental trellis cucumbers were slightly but significantly milder than american slicers for judges susceptible to burping. `Marketmore 76' and `Tasty Bright' were normal-bitter, and `Marketmore 80' was bitterfree. An additional 11 oriental trellis cultivars were also tested for bitterness to determine whether Tasty Bright was typical in bitterness; they were all normal-bitter. In conclusion, oriental trellis cucumbers are not bitterfree, but are slightly milder for burp-susceptible people to eat. Finally, burpless is the marketing term for oriental trellis cucumbers in the United States.

Full access

Yield data for the major cucurbit crops in the United States have been collected and summarized. Yield trends are presented for cucumber (Cucumis sativus; processing and fresh-market), melon (Cucumis melo; muskmelon and honeydew), and watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) for the period 1951–2005. Data have been obtained from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as originally reported by six of its units: Agricultural Marketing Service, Agricultural Research Service, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Economic Statistics Service, National Agricultural Statistics Service, and Statistical Reporting Service. For all crops yields have been increasing over time, except for processing cucumber, for which yields seem to have reached a plateau by the end of the 1990s.

Full access

-assisted instruction be used by students for woody plant identification? HortTechnology 10 381 384 Kalloo, G. 1988 Vegetable breeding Vol. I CRC Press Boca Raton, FL Lea-Cox, J.D. Zhao, C. Ross, D.S. Bilderback, T.E. Harris, J.R. Day, S.D. Hong, C. Yeager, T.H. Beeson

Free access

melon cultivars. Combining high levels of disease resistance with excellent horticultural characteristics, however, is often a challenging task in vegetable breeding ( Guan et al., 2012 ). Damages caused by several soilborne and foliar diseases are still

Full access

variety was developed by Glenn Drowns during the 1970s in Idaho ( Seed Savers Exchange, 2016 ). This is a short-season variety that is adapted to cooler environmental conditions. The Southeastern Vegetable Breeding Laboratory in Charleston, SC, was the

Open Access

commercial producers’ needs ( Morris and Sands, 2006 ; Sands et al., 2009 ). Before the 21st century, few vegetable breeding programs prioritized traits desired by consumers (such as enhanced nutrition or flavor), focusing instead on producer-valued traits

Open Access

-ready varieties. With the exception of N-efficient potato varieties from Europe, improved nutrient use efficiency (NUE) is rarely the main focus of either type of vegetable breeding programs. Overall, breeding for improved pest resistance is the main focus. By

Full access

Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Dr. Jim Myers (2017, 2022), Baggett-Frazier Endowed Professor of Vegetable Breeding and Genetics at Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Dr. Mikal Saltveit, Jr (1989, 1990), Professor at the University of California

Open Access