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High-quality cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit are required to fulfil the growing markets for fresh fruit. Storage losses of fresh cranberries are primarily the result of decay and physiological breakdown. Maximizing quality and storage life of fresh cranberries starts in the field with good cultural practices. Proper fertility, pest management, pruning, and sanitation all contribute to the quality and longevity of the fruit. Mechanical damage in the form of bruising must be minimized during harvesting and postharvest handling, including storage, grading, and packaging. In addition, water-harvested fruit should be removed promptly from the bog water. Following harvest, fruit should be cooled quickly to an optimum storage temperature of between 2 and 5 °C (35.6 and 41.0 °F). The development of improved handling, refined storage conditions, and new postharvest treatments hold promise to extend the storage life of fresh cranberries.

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Commercially grown honey dew fruit [Cucumis melo (Inodorus group)] typically are harvested before abscission because fruit cut unripe have a longer storage life than fully ripe fruit. However, because fully ripe fruit contain higher concentrations of soluble solids (predominantly as sugars), an attribute that increases their preference among consumers, methods are being explored to extend the storage life of fully ripe fruit. In this study, fully abscised honey dew fruit were evaluated for tissue attributes and consumer preference following postharvest dipping in either chelated or nonchelated calcium (Ca) solutions. Calcium sources were an amino acid-chelated Ca, ethylene-diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-chelated Ca, or calcium chloride (CaCl2), with each provided at three different rates. Fruit were evaluated at harvest, and after 14 or 22 days commercial storage. Evaluations were peel surface changes (color and disorders), hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration, flesh firmness, soluble solids concentration, and consumer preference of the edible flesh. Peel color became yellowed and lighter during storage for all fruit, with higher Ca rates resulting in more intensely yellowed fruit. Hypodermal-mesocarp tissue Ca concentration was 0.90 mg·g-1 of fresh weight (900 ppm) at harvest, and declined in all fruit by 22 days storage. Peel disorders (disease and spotting) were none to slight for all fruit by 14 days storage, but by 22 days storage disease incidence ranged from none to severe, depending on the Ca source and rate. Fruit firmness declined in all fruit throughout storage, with the smallest declines measured in fruit treated with the amino acid-chelated Ca. Soluble solids concentration of fully ripe fruit was 12.3% at harvest, and showed either no decline or slight declines with storage among the treatments. Consumer preference was highest for freshly harvested fruit, but fruit were desirable even after 22 days storage across all treatments. Postharvest application of Ca at ≤0.16 m Ca in an amino acid-chelated form, versus EDTA-chelated Ca or CaCl2, slowed honey dew melon senescence so that after 22 days of commercial and retail storage the fruit were of high marketable quality, and there was no detrimental effect on consumer preference for the edible flesh.

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compared with MH fruit using side–slapper finger harvest technology from that era; they reported that MH fruit were softer than HH fruit, resulting in significantly higher losses and increased decay during storage. Since then, several studies have evaluated

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stages in dudaim melon during storage. Material and methods Planting and harvesting . Two cultivars of dudaim melon (Zangi-Abad and Kermanshah) were direct-seeded in a randomized complete block design at the Mohammad-Shahr Research Station (Karaj, Iran

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, geotropic stem bending, excessive respiration/transpiration, or storage/handling at high temperatures ( Joyce, 1988 ; Maxie et al., 1973 ; Reid, 2002 ). To slow down senescence, storage facilities must be available and storage methods well planned before

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risk of decay from holding the fruit at higher temperatures than the preferred storage temperature for mandarins [5 to 8 °C ( Arpaia and Kader 2000 )] that would be most effective at reducing acidity. A variety of interventions have been tested to

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first noted in Fall 2006 by a North Carolina grower. Once the incidence was discovered, ‘Covington’ storage root stocks from all of the Certified Seed Growers were evaluated in Feb. 2007. One farm, in which the original report of IN was made, had a high

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storage life of blueberry fruit has previously been shown to be enhanced by harvesting less-mature fruit ( Ballinger et al., 1978 ; Beaudry et al., 1998 ; Galletta et al., 1971 ) and maintenance under a controlled atmosphere (CA) ( Beaudry et al., 1998

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domesticated varieties as Takahashi (1984) concluded for wild and domesticated rice ( Oryza spp.). In domesticated flower seed crops, any minimal amount of dormancy that occurs is easily overcome by typical dry storage conditions used by flower seed

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phytosanitary regulations for apples. The SA involves the cumulative effect of commercial operations to reduce the risk of possible pest infestation followed with validation by intense inspection. One area that can be exploited is the cold storage component

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