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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Santosh Shiwakoti, Shital Poudyal, Thomas Horgan, Natasha Kovatcheva, and Anna Dobreva

-pinene, camphene, sabinene, β-pinene, 1-octen-3-ol, myrcene, hexenyl acetate, paracymene, limonene, eucalyptol, cis-sabinene hydrate, paracymenenene, cis-thujone, transthujone, isothujol, camphor, borneol, menthol, 4-terpineol, paramethyl acetophenone/paracymen-8

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Mario R. Morales and James E. Simon

`African Beauty', a new ornamental camphor basil cultivar, was developed through three cycles of selfing and selection from USDA accession PI 500942, originally collected in Zambia, Africa. `African Beauty' was field-evaluated and compared with PI 500942 (the original population), PI 500954 (another accession from Zambia), a camphor cultivar from Companion Plants, and three other related lines in 1997 and 1998. Most commercial camphor basils are tall (50 to 60 cm), late-flowering, and unattractive. Our goal was to develop a new cultivar that had a short stature (≈40 cm), an early flowering, and an attractive appearance. The outcome was `African Beauty', which has the following characteristics: plant height: 30 to 35 cm, plant spread: 50 to 55 cm, leaf length: 6.3 to 6.7 cm, days to flower: 76 days, inflorescence length: 25 cm, essential oil yield: 3 mL/100 g dw. The essential oil of `African Beauty' is also highly aromatic, with 72% camphor, 12% camphene, and 9% limonene. The plant is a fast-growing, semicompact aromatic plant that produces small leaves and large quantities of long and slender inflorescences that, when fully developed, curve at the tip like the tail of a cat. Blooming usually lasts from 20 to 25 days, when the plant looks most beautiful. `African Beauty' is an attractive ornamental that would be excellent as a garden border plant, or as an indoor potted plant.

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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Tess Astatkie, Thomas Horgan, Vicki Schlegel, and Xavier Simonnet

). Statistical analysis. The effect of DT on essential oil content as well as the concentration and yield of alpha-pinene, camphene, paracymene, eucalyptol, camphor, borneol, beta-caryophyllene, transbeta-farnesene, beta-chamigrene, germacrene-D, gamma

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Mostafa Farajpour, Mohsen Ebrahimi, Amin Baghizadeh, and Mostafa Aalifar

-pinene, 1,8-Cineole, camphor, ascaridole, linalool, α- and β-thujone, cis - and trans β-ocimene, myrcene, limonene, γ-terpinene, caryophyllene oxide, a-bisabolol, β-eudesmol, and α-phellandrene ( Dehghan and Elmi, 2015 ; Ebrahimi et al., 2012

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Valtcho D. Zheljazkov, Charles L. Cantrell, William B. Evans, M. Wayne Ebelhar, and Christine Coker

chemotaxonomical range of sweet basil is very wide. For example, in a study on 270 sweet basil accessions, the major constituents were found to be (–)-linalool (up to 71%), methyl chavicol, or citral and 1,8-cineole, (–)-camphor, thymol, methyl cinnamate, eugenol

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Clyde L. Elmore, Lawrence R. Costello, and W. Douglas Hamilton

Cider gum (Eucalyptus gunnii Hook. F.), Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), and camphor tree [Cinnamonium camphora (L.) J. Presl] were evaluated in a field study comparing the effects of herbicides on tree growth. Trees were planted on 13 May 1983 and treated on 20 May 1983, 10 Apr. 1984, and 4 Oct. 1984 with simazine, oryzalin, napropamide, and oxyfluorfen. Glyphosate was applied as a postemergence treatment in all basins on 20 Mar. 1984. None of the herbicides injured the trees. Trunk circumferencesin treated plots increased as much as 553% over untreated plots. All species showed a positive response to increasing weed control. Chemical names used: 6-chloro-N,N'-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine); 3,5-dinitro-N4,N4-dipropylsulfanilamide (oryzalin); N,N-diethyl-2-(1-naphthalenyloxy)-propanamide (napropamide); 2-chloro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene (oxyfluorfen); N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine (glyphosate).

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Azza A. Tawfik, Susan L. Cuppett, and Paul E. Read

Shoot tips (7 to 10 mm long) of rosemary plant (Rosmarinus officinalis L. 'Lockwood de forest') were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ) (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2 mg/l) alone or with 3-indole acetic acid (IAA) at 0.5 mg/l. The effect of TDZ and IAA on the proliferation of rosemary shoot tips has been reported in a previous meeting. Here, we report on the effect of TDZ and IAA on the monoterpene constituents identified in the oil of rosemary plants propagated in vitro. The proliferated explants were soaked in hexane as a solvent, then the extractions were used for monoterpene analysis using GC/MS. A significant interaction of TDZ by IAA was found on most of the oil components identified. The highest levels of 1,8-cineole and borneol were obtained at 0.5 mg TDZ/l alone, while the highest level of camphor was obtained at 0.5 mg TDZ/l plus 0.5 mg IAA/l. The highest level of bornyl acetate was at 2 mg TDZ/l.

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Azza A. Tawfik, Paul E. Read, and Susan L. Cuppett

Callus of Rosmarinus officinalis L. 'Lockwood de forest' was induced from stem segments (3 mm long) using different concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ). The original stem segments used as explants were found to have a higher level of linalool than was found for leaf segments. Linalool is one of the monoterpenes identified in rosemary plants and it has a pleasant aroma. TDZ has a significant effect on callus formation and callus texture. The callus formed was light green to yellow and/or had some meristimatic dark green cells. TDZ had a significant linear effect on the callus fresh weight. The meristimatic green cells formed on all calli except those proliferated on the lowest concentration of TDZ (0.5 mg/l). No callus was induced from stem segments cultured on TDZ-free medium. The fresh calli from other treatments were soaked in hexane as a solvent for monoterpene analysis using GC/MS. No monoterpenes could be detected in the callus induced on the medium containing the lowest concentration of TDZ. Comparing to the stem segments taken from the parent plants only 4 of 10 monoterpenes identified were found in the callus: α-pinene, β-pinene, 1,8-cineole, and camphor.

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Jianjun Wang, Wangshu Zhang, and Huahong Huang

ideal for roadside plantings, windbreaks, and shade trees. It can also be used to extract camphor and camphor oil for pharmaceutical use and as a flavoring. At present, C. camphora is widely used as an important urban tree in many Chinese cities such

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Cynthia B. McKenney, Sandra A. Balch, Victor Hegemann, and Susan P. Metz

from the crowns of Salvia spp. As a result of the presence of volatile compounds released by these shrubs, the germination of other herbaceous species is inhibited. Volatiles found in Salvia spp. included the terpenes camphor, α-pinene, β