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Timothy K. Broschat

Release rates at 21 °C were determined in sand columns for 12 commercially available soluble and controlled-release Mg fertilizers. Lutz Mg spikes, K2SO4, MgSO4, MgSO4·H2O, and MgSO4·7H2O released their Mg within 2 to 3 weeks. Within the first 6 weeks, MgO·MgSO4 released its soluble Mg fraction, but little release occurred thereafter. Dolomite and MgO released <5% of their Mg over 2 years while MagAmp released <20% of its Mg. Florikan 1N-0P-26K-4Mg types 100 and 180 exhibited typical controlled-release fertilizer characteristics, with most of their Mg release occurring during the first 15 weeks.

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David R. Byrnes, Fekadu F. Dinssa, Stephen C. Weller and James E. Simon

as the high source thresholds per nutrient trait by Codex Alimentarius (1997) definitions: 4.2 mg/100 g Fe, 90 mg/100 g Mg, 300 mg/100 g Ca, and 4.5 mg/100 g Zn, by fresh weight basis. Previous studies have evaluated vegetable amaranth for nutrition

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Gerry H. Neilsen, Denise Neilsen, Sung-hee Guak and Tom Forge

fruit samples, N was determined by combustion on a 0.12–0.13 g sample using a Leco-FP-528 N-analyzer (LECO Corporation, St. Joseph, MI). Ca, Mg, B, P, and K were determined by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrophotometry (Spectro Analytical

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Kyong Ju Choi, Gap Chae Chung and Sung Ju Ahn

Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings were grafted onto cucumber-(CG) or figleaf gourd (FG, Cucurbita ficifolia Bouche) seedlings in order to determine the effect of solution temperature 12, 22, and 32C) on the mineral composition of xylem sap and plasma membrane K+–Mg++–ATPase activities of the roots. Low solution temperature (12C) lowered the concentration \batchmode \documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amsmath} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \(\mathrm{NO}_{3}^{-}\) \end{document} and \batchmode \documentclass[fleqn,10pt,legalpaper]{article} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amsmath} \pagestyle{empty} \begin{document} \(\mathrm{H}_{2}\mathrm{PO}_{4}^{-}\) \end{document} in xylem sap of CG plants, but not of FG plants. Concentrations of K+, Ca++, and Mg++ in xylem sap were less affected than anions by solution temperature. The plasma membrane of FG plants grown in 12C solution temperature showed the highest K+–Mg++–ATPase activity at all ATP concentrations up to 3 mM and at low reaction temperature up to 12C, indicating resistance of figleaf gourd to low root temperature.

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William R. Argo, John A. Biernbaum and Darryl D. Warncke

Chemical analyses of 4306 randomly selected greenhouse water samples for 1995 from the United States and Canada were obtained from four analytical laboratories and graphically characterized using a distribution analysis. For pH, electro-conductivity (EC), and nutrient concentrations, a mean and median value and the percentage of samples with concentrations above or below those generally considered acceptable are presented for all samples and the 10 leading states in floricultural production. The median nutrient concentrations were more representative of the type of water found throughout the United States and Canada than that of the mean values because of the unequal distribution of the data. The overall median water source had a pH of 7.1; an EC of 0.4 dS·m−1; an alkalinity of CaCO3 at 130 mg·L−1; (in mg·L−1) 40 Ca, 11 Mg, 8 SO4−S, 13 Na, 14 Cl, 0.02 B, and <0.01 F; a Ca: Mg ratio of 3.2, and a sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) of 0.7. The information presented characterizes irrigation water and may assist in developing more refined fertilizer recommendations for greenhouse crop production.

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G.H. Neilsen, D. Neilsen, L.C. Herbert and E.J. Hogue

A split-plot experimental design was imposed in the year of planting and maintained for the first five growing seasons in a high density apple orchard on M.9 rootstock planted at 1.5 m (within row) × 4 m (between row) in a loamy sand soil susceptible to K deficiency when drip-irrigated. Four N-K fertigation treatments involving low (N1) and high (N2) rates of N combined with 0 (K0) or 15 g K/tree per year (K1) were applied in five replicated and randomized main plot units. Subplots consisted of three-tree plots of each of the apple cultivars Gala, Fuji, Fiesta and Spartan. Soil solution monitoring indicated the maintenance of distinctly different soil solution N and K concentrations in the respective N-K treatments during the study. The most important plant response was prevention of the development of K deficiency by the K1-fertigation treatment. Fertigation of 15 g K/tree generally increased leaf K, fruit K and Mg concentrations, fruit size and yield and fruit titratable acidity and red coloration at harvest for all cultivars. K fertigation also decreased leaf Mg and B concentrations, fruit N, P and Ca concentration and fruit firmness. In addition to leaf K concentrations <1%, K deficiency was associated with fruit K concentrations <100 mg/100 g fresh weight and soil solution K concentration <5 mg·L-1. Increasing the rate of fertigated N when growth was constrained by K deficiency increased leaf N and Mn and decreased leaf P and B, but had no effect on tree vigor or fruit production and quality.

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Issam A. Hassaballa, M.G. Moughieth, N.A. Hagagy and N.S. Zayed

Shoot tip and single-node cutting explants of `Hamawy' and `El-Amar' apricot cultivars were initiated from forced shoots of field-grown, virus-free trees. Explants were cultured on Murashige & Skoog (MS) Nitsch & Nitsch and Anderson media. Different modifications of MS medium were also evaluated. Antioxidant pretreatment reduced phenolic compounds and decreased necrosis. Modified MS was the best medium for plantlets regeneration, with positive effectiveness of adenine sulfate addition to the modified MS. Shoot multiplication was best on 2.0 mg·L–1 BAP and 1.0 mg·L–1 thidiazuron (TDZ). Also, half-strength MS medium was superior for shoot elongation Surface coverage, 16 hours light/8 hours dark cycle, and 2.0 mg·L–1 IBA induced good rooting. Rooted plantlets were successfully acclimated ex vitro.

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M.G. Karlsson

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N.K Lownds, M.G. White and R.D. Berghage

Previous work has shown that container grown landscape plants use, and likely need, much less water than is typically applied. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify the relationships between water loss and water stress responses using several drought tolerant (Cassia corymbosa, Leucophyllum frutescens, Salvia greggii) and traditional landscape plants (Euonymus japonicus, Pyracantha coccinea). Water stress was induced by withholding water and water loss measured gravimetrically. The shape of the water loss curve was similar for all species being, Y = a + bx + cx2 (r2 > 0.95). The rate of ethylene production began to increase 24 hr after irrigation, reaching a maximum 36-48 hr after irrigation and then decreasing. Maximum ethylene production occured at 35-47% water loss irrespective of species or rate of water loss. Stress symptoms (wilting leaf discoloration and abscission) followed a similar pattern. The potential for monitoring gravimetric water loss to schedule container irrigation will be discussed.

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N.K Lownds, M.G. White and R.D. Berghage

Previous work has shown that container grown landscape plants use, and likely need, much less water than is typically applied. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify the relationships between water loss and water stress responses using several drought tolerant (Cassia corymbosa, Leucophyllum frutescens, Salvia greggii) and traditional landscape plants (Euonymus japonicus, Pyracantha coccinea). Water stress was induced by withholding water and water loss measured gravimetrically. The shape of the water loss curve was similar for all species being, Y = a + bx + cx2 (r2 > 0.95). The rate of ethylene production began to increase 24 hr after irrigation, reaching a maximum 36-48 hr after irrigation and then decreasing. Maximum ethylene production occured at 35-47% water loss irrespective of species or rate of water loss. Stress symptoms (wilting leaf discoloration and abscission) followed a similar pattern. The potential for monitoring gravimetric water loss to schedule container irrigation will be discussed.