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Haley Hibbert-Frey, John Frampton, Frank A. Blazich, Doug Hundley, and L. Eric Hinesley

Fraser fir ( Abies fraseri ) is one of the most popular Christmas tree species in the United States. It occurs naturally at elevations above 1370 m on isolated mountaintops in the southern Appalachian Mountains from southwest Virginia through

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Pascal Nzokou and Bert M. Cregg

Fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] is widely planted for Christmas tree production in the midwest and eastern United States. The species has a unique natural distribution, restricted to high elevations in the southern Appalachian Mountains

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Şemsettin Kulaç, Pascal Nzokou, Deniz Guney, Bert Michael Cregg, and Ibrahim Turna

Fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] is widely planted for Christmas tree production in the midwest and eastern United States. The species has a unique natural distribution, restricted to the southern Appalachian Mountains of southwestern

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Yingqian Lin, Alexa R. Wilson, and Pascal Nzokou

. 114 856 859 Wilson, A.R. Nzokou, P. Cregg, B.M. 2010 Ground covers in Fraser fir (Abies fraseri Pursh. Poir) production systems: Effects on soil fertility, tree morphology and foliar nutrient status Europ. J. Hort. Sci (In press). Wilson, J.B. 1988

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Pascal Nzokou and Paligwende Nikiema

During the past few years, unusual winter temperature patterns have caused serious damage to Colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens ) and Fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir] in mid-Michigan nursery and Christmas tree plantations. Damages

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Haley Hibbert-Frey, John Frampton, Frank A. Blazich, and L. Eric Hinesley

Grafting fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] scions onto rootstocks of turkish fir (Abies bornmuelleriana Mattf.) is a strategy used by some Christmas tree growers in the southern Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina to reduce losses by phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands. This study compared the traditional time of grafting (April) with eight summer/early fall grafting dates from mid-July through mid-October. Shade and irrigation treatments were also superimposed on the grafting dates. To ensure optimal grafting success, grafting should be performed in the late winter/early spring (April) when scions are dormant and the rootstocks are becoming active. April graft success was 95% but when grafting fresh scions in summer/fall, graft success decreased from 52% in July to 0% in October. Shade improved summer graft success (52% with, 38% without). Irrigation did not significantly affect graft success or subsequent growth. In a supplemental storage study, grafting of stored scion material in summer/early fall was not successful (less than 1%).

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Bert M. Cregg, Pascal Nzokou, and Ron Goldy

plasticulture technology and other weed control techniques on growth, photosynthetic gas exchange, water relations, and nutrition of newly planted seedlings of fraser fir [ Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] and colorado blue spruce ( Picea pungens Engelm.), two

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L. Eric Hinesley and Layne K. Snelling

Various pruning treatments were evaluated to determine the best procedure to correct terminal bud loss in Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.]. Removing the top node (expanding terminal and subterminal buds) soon after budbreak combined with light pruning of the major branches in the next two lower whorls best restored a normal leader. This procedure allowed one or more shoots just below the cut to become orthotropic leaders in the first growing season. All but one of these shoots were removed, and only a single leader was retained after growth matured in late August or September.

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L. Eric Hinesley and Layne K. Snelling

Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] Christmas trees up to 3.2 m in height were sampled from 18 well-managed plantations in western North Carolina to determine the yield of decoration greenery (wreaths, roping). Trees were not sidesheared in the year of harvest. The proportion of branch material suitable for decoration greenery decreased with increasing height and crown taper, but crown density had no effect. Mean annual yield of decoration greenery (establishment in the field, until reaching an average height of 3.2 m 10 years later) was 1.9 to 2.3 kg/tree per year, respectively, for trees with medium or heavy crown density.

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L. Eric Hinesley and Layne K. Snelling

Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] Christmas trees were basal pruned (branches were removed from the lower 15 to 25 cm of the stem, i.e., handle) at heights ranging from 0.6 to 0.9 m up to 1.5 to 1.8 m tall, and were harvested 2 to 4 years later. Basal pruning reduced cutting time ≈25%, and baling time ≈10%. Commercial height and stem diameter were unaffected, but the average harvest weight of pruned trees 2.1 to 2.4 m tall (2 to 4 years after basal pruning) was reduced ≈1.4 kg.