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Catarina Saude, Mary Ruth McDonald, and Sean Westerveld

). Losses are associated with reduction of the leaf photosynthetic area and weakening of the petioles induced by the leaf blight pathogens. Infected and weakened petioles often break during mechanical harvest, leaving the root in the ground ( Langenberg

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R. Karina Gallardo, Qi Zhang, Michael Dossett, James J. Polashock, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, Nicholi Vorsa, Patrick P. Edger, Hamid Ashrafi, Ebrahiem Babiker, Chad E. Finn, and Massimo Iorizzo

contribute to increase profitability by increasing price premiums and reducing labor costs needed to harvest the fruit. Implementing mechanical harvesting for the fresh market is crucial to the long-term sustainability of the blueberry industry in times when

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Luis Pozo and Jacqueline K. Burns

The use of the abscission agent 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1 H -pyrazole (CMNP) in combination with mechanical harvesting increases mature sweet orange fruit removal without causing phytotoxicity to leaves and young developing fruit through most of

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Mark K. Ehlenfeldt, Joseph Kawash, and James Polashock

incorporate germplasm from this section into cultivated germplasm and transfer the desirable traits that these species possess for mechanical harvesting and commercial production. The objective we address here is the evaluation of hybrids and BC 1 derivatives

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S.D. Rooks, J.R. Ballington, and C.M. Mainland

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Changying Li, Pengcheng Yu, Fumiomi Takeda, and Gerard Krewer

harvested by mechanical harvesters was substantially higher (55% to 78%) than that of fruit harvested by hand (23%) ( Brown et al., 1996 ; Peterson et al., 1997 ). Clearly, the key to adapting the mechanical harvest to fresh-market blueberry is to reduce

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Aline Coelho Frasca, Monica Ozores-Hampton, John Scott, and Eugene McAvoy

cultivar had higher individual fruit weight than the NC 13G-1 line ( Kemble, 1993 ). Compact growth habit cultivars that have the jointless pedicel characteristic ( j or j-2 genes) may be once-over mechanically harvested, eliminating the need for

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Yanbin Su, Yumei Liu, Huolin Shen, Xingguo Xiao, Zhansheng Li, Zhiyuan Fang, Limei Yang, Mu Zhuang, and Yangyong Zhang

, yield, storability, and mechanical harvestability. In addition, susceptibility to head splitting hinders the prolongation of harvest time and thus the ability of growers to select harvest times for optimal selling price. Head splitting resistance is thus

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Naveen Kumar and Robert C. Ebel

’ sweet orange crop ( Li et al., 2008 ). It has also been shown to aid in mechanical harvesting of citrus in Florida ( Yuan and Burns, 2004 ). Several studies have been conducted to understand the mechanism of CMNP-induced loosening in mature citrus fruit

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D.L. Peterson, S.S. Miller, and J.D. Whitney

Three years of mechanical harvesting (shake and catch) trials with two freestanding apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) cultivars on a semidwarf rootstock (M.7a) and two training systems (central leader and open center) yielded 64% to 77% overall harvesting efficiency. Mechanically harvested `Bisbee Delicious' apples averaged 70% Extra Fancy and 10% Fancy grade, while two `Golden Delicious' strains (`Smoothee' and `Frazier Goldspur') averaged 40% Extra Fancy and 13% Fancy grade fruit. Mechanically harvesting fresh-market-quality apples from semidwarf freestanding trees was difficult and its potential limited. Cumulative yield of open-center trees was less than that of central-leader trees during the 3 years (sixth through eighth leaf) of our study. `Golden Delicious' trees generally produced higher yields than `Delicious' trees.