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A. A. Boe, Winston C. Dunwell, and Thomas J. Bakken

Abstract

‘Latah’ and ‘Shoshone’ tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.), are 2 new cultivars of the “Sub-Arctic Type” (1). Both are “ultra-early” cultivars which ripen with the “Sub Arctics” and will produce ripe fruit in areas where standard “early” cultivars do not mature. “Ultra-early” cultivars are a new class of tomatoes which extend the range where tomatoes may be grown into short and cool growing season areas. Under warm conditions they are useful as a very early crop ripening 14—21 days before the standard “early” cultivars. ‘Latah’ is named for Latah County, Idaho, where it was selected. ‘Shoshone’ is named for an Indian tribe of Idaho.

Open access

M. LeRon Robbins and P. D. Dukes

Abstract

The South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Footlong’ polebean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

Open access

W. Akratanakul, J. R. Baggett, and H. J. Mack

Abstract

Wider spacing and fertilizer application increased the weight of both axillary heads (AH) and main heads in an open-pollinated cultivar and an inbred line. AH weight increased more than main head weight. The effect of spacing on AH was greater than that of fertilizer application. Transplanting greatly decreased the development of axillary heads when compared with direct-seeding.

Open access

A. K. Stoner

Abstract

‘Wakefield is a processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) released by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The developmental work was done by the Vegetable Laboratory at the Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Md. ‘Wakefield’ is an early maturing, machine-harvestable cultivar that is adapted to the Eastern U.S. It has been grown and performed satisfactorily in Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Indiana.

Open access

J. E. Wyatt, J. C. Hoffman, and J. R. Deakin

Abstract

Breeding line B4000-3 is a white-seeded, bush-type snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) developed by the U. S. Vegetable Laboratory (USVL). B4000-3 has several characteristics of value to snap bean breeding programs. It has been tested for several seasons throughout the United States and has shown adaptation to diverse environments.

Open access

M. LeRon Robbins and F. P. Cuthbert Jr.

Abstract

The South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Charlestowne’ and ‘Roots’ turnip, Brassica campestris L. (Rapifera group), which are resistant to the turnip aphid, Hyadaphis erysiimi (Kattenbach).

Open access

W. A. Hills, E. V. Wann, P. D. Dukes, George Fassuliotis, and J. A. Wells

Abstract

‘Patriot’ is a determinate tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with excellent fruit color, developed primarily as a fresh-market or home-garden type. It is resistant to root knot and fusarium wilt.

Open access

J. R. Baggett, W. A. Frazier, and G. W. Varseveld

Abstract

Lines Oregon 4, 5, 6, and 14 carrot CDaucus carota L.) were released for breeding or further selection, after the Oregon State University breeding program was terminated in 1978. These lines were developed at Corvallis with consistent exposure to wet autumn weather and are considered to have useful resistance to cracking and rotting under such conditions. They are primarily for processing use, and have shown good quality when canned or frozen, with deep orange to red-orange color and little occurrence of green core.

Open access

R. B. Volin, J. J. Augustine, H. H. Bryan, D. S. Burgis, Pat Crill, J. W. Strobel, and C. A. John

Abstract

Florida 1011, an inbred line of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was developed at the Agricultural Research and Education Center in Homestead and Bradenton in cooperation with the H. J. Heinz Company. The line is designated Florida 1011 in recognition of its Southern Tomato Exchange Program (STEP) designation (3).

Open access

A. M. Rhodes

Abstract

Cultivars of Cucurbita mixta Pang, have been slowly disappearing from listings in seed catalogs in the United States. Several years ago 4 cultivars were listed: ‘Green Striped Cushaw’, ‘White Cushaw,’ ‘Japanese Pie,’ and ‘Tennessee Sweet Potato.’ Today, ‘Green Striped Cushaw’ is occasionally listed. Of the other 3 cultivars, the author has recently seen only fruits of ‘White Cushaw’, which were produced by growers who save their own seed. Although these 4 cultivars of C. mixta are productive, they are very susceptible to powdery mildew, which may account for their decline in popularity.