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M. LeRon Robbins and C. S. Creighton

Abstract

The South Carolina Agriculture Experiment Station and the United States Department of Agriculture announce the joint release of ‘Carolina’ collard Brassica oleracea L. (Acephala group). ‘Carolina’ offers potential because of its resistance to downy mildew incited by Penospora parasitica (Pers.) ex Fr., because of its desirable horticultural characteristics, and because it broadens the genetic base of collard.

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David H. Trinklein and Victor N. Lambeth

Abstract

‘Tuckcross 756P’ is an early, large, pink-fruited three-way hybrid tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) that is adapted for greenhouse culture in the northern U.S. and Canada. Since 1971 it has performed well in experiment station and commercial greenhouse trials (2, 3, 4). With early production of good quality fruit, ‘Tuckcross 756P’ is also resistant to fusarium wilt and tolerant to leaf mold.

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A. A. Boe, P. J. Pelofske, and T. J. Bakken

Abstract

‘Santa’, ‘Gem State’, and ‘Benewah’ tomatoes {Ly copersicon esculentum Mill.) are 3 new “ultra early” cultivars. ‘Santa’ and ‘Benawah’ resemble the “Sub Arties” (1) whereas ‘Gem State’ is a dwarf patio type similar to ‘Pixie’.

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V. L. Guzman and T. A. Zitter

Abstract

Florida 1974, a cos-type lettuce, has achieved some of the goals of our lettuce breeding program. It is homozygous for resistance to lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) and bidens mottle virus (BMoV) and is released primarily for breeding purposes.

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A. A. Hassan, H. M. Mazayd, S. E. Moustafa, S. H. Nassar, M. K. Nakhla, and W. L. Sims

Abstract

Inheritance of resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) was studied in the interspecific crosses Lycopersicon escutentum Mill. cv. UC 82 x Lycopersicon cheesmanii ssp. minor (Hook) C.H. Mill. LA 1401, and Lycopersicon esculentum cv. VF 145-B-7879 x Lycopersicon hirsutum Humb. and Bonpl. LA 386. Genetic populations were artificially inoculated with TYLCV prior to transplanting, and were later evaluated under field conditions. Reaction of parents, F2 and F3 plants, and backcrosses of resistant F2 plants to UC 82, indicated that resistance derived from L. cheesmanii seems to be recessive. Narrow sense heritability (NSH) was 0.44. Reaction of parental F1, F2, and backcross plants indicated that resistance derived from L. hirsutum is dominant and controlled by more than one gene.

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Booker T. Whatley and Bobby R. Phills

Abstract

‘Rojo Blanco’, a new cultivar of sweet potato (Impomoea batatas Lam), has been released by Tuskegee Institute for the Latin trade in New York, Chicago, and Denver marketing areas, as well as Latin American countries. ‘Rojo Blanco’ should be considered a substitute for the ‘Boniato’ or ‘Cuban’ sweet potato, which is rough, veiny, produces less than 5% U.S. no. 1 roots and does not store well. ‘Rojo Blanco’ is intermediate in resistance to fusarium wilt, (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. batatas), which is comparable with that of ‘Centennial’ and therefore, should be satisfactory for most growing conditions. It is susceptible to the southern root-knot nematode, (Meloidogyne incognita), (Table 1).

Open access

J. R. Baggett, W. A. Frazier, and G. W. Varseveld

‘Oregon 83’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon, where beans of the ‘Blue Lake’ type, either bush or pole, have been important for about 50 years. ‘Oregon 83’ is generally ‘Blue Lake’ in foliage and pod characteristics (Fig. 1). It may supplement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a high yielding cultivar from the Oregon State University breeding program. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 83’ is slightly later, has a shorter, straighter pod, and better growth habit. The medium-length, generally straighter pods should facilitate more efficient processing.

Open access

S. Z. Berry and W. A. Gould

Abstract

‘Ohio 7663’ is an early-main season, machine-harvest tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) with canning quality suitable for coreless whole-pack product. It was evaluated with good results, in the Northern Tomato Exchange Program (N.T.E.P.) trials in 1977 and 1978 and in other tests in Midwestern United States and Canada.

Open access

J. R. Baggett and W. A. Frazier

Abstract

Oregon T5-4 is a tomato breeding line with a strong tendency for early parthenocarpic fruit set under cool conditions. Extreme earliness in T5-4 is associated with early flowering, the ability to set seedless fruit under low temperature, and possibly with fast ripening of seedless fruit. Although the line lacks uniformity and crack resistance, and has poor color, it has good flavor and could be used in home gardens in areas with a climate similar to that of western Oregon. The principal value of T5-4, however, should be in breeding small to medium-sized tomatoes for cool northern and coastal areas.

Open access

S. Z. Berry and W. A. Gould

Abstract

‘Ohio 736’ is an early, well-adapted machine-harvest tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) with superior canning quality.