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Robert E. Paull

Abstract

Rating scales and their descriptions are described for spadix condition, spathe discoloration, and gloss for anthurium inflorescence.

Free access

Dave Llewellyn, Katherine Schiestel, and Youbin Zheng

met one or more of these criteria. Vase life. Vase life trials were performed by collecting one marketable flower from each cultivar in each plot during flower harvests on 17 and 20 Jan. 2014 (trial 1), and again on 12, 14, and 18 Feb. 2014 (trial 2

Open access

Abby Pace, Bruce L. Dunn, Charles Fontanier, Carla Goad, and Hardeep Singh

length, disease resistance, and postharvest longevity ( Satoh et al., 2005 ). Most carnation cut-flower studies have focused on improving vase life and postharvest quality vs. marketability ( Chang-li et al., 2011 ; Hamidimoghadam et al., 2014 ; Heins

Open access

Abby Pace, Bruce L. Dunn, and Charles Fontanier

vase life. Both spray and dip methods were effective, but spray resulted in more flowers with areas of heightened glow, likely because of residual water droplets, than dip. Future research should evaluate different glow-in-the-dark products, rates

Free access

John M. Dole, Paul Fisher, and Geoffrey Njue

Several treatments were investigated for increasing vase life of cut `Renaissance Red' poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch.) stems. A vase life of at least 20.6 days resulted when harvested stems were placed directly into vases with 22 °C deionized water plus 200 mg·L-1 8-HQS (the standard floral solution used) and 0% to 1% sucrose without floral foam. Maturity of stems at harvest, ranging from 0 to 4 weeks after anthesis, had no effect on vase life or days to first abscised leaf. Pretreatments immediately after harvest using floral solution heated to 38 or 100 °C, or 1 or 10-min dips in isopropyl alcohol, had no effect, whereas 24 hours in 10% sucrose shortened vase life by 6.4 days and time to first abscised cyathium by 4.5 days. Stem storage at 10 °C decreased vase life, particularly when stems were stored dry (with only 0.8 days vase life after 3 weeks dry storage). Increasing duration of wet storage in floral solution from 0 to 3 weeks decreased vase life from 21.5 to 14.6 days. Placing cut stems in a vase containing floral foam decreased time to first abscised leaf by 3.7 to 11.6 days compared with no foam. A 1% to 2% sucrose concentration in the vase solution produced the longest postharvest life for stems placed in foam but had little effect on stems not placed in foam. A 4% sucrose concentration decreased vase life compared with lower sucrose concentrations regardless of the presence of foam. Holding stems in the standard floral solution increased vase life and delayed leaf abscission compared with deionized or tap water only, with further improvement when stem bases were recut every three days. Commercial floral pretreatments and holding solutions had no effect on vase life and days to first abscised cyathium but delayed leaf abscission.

Free access

Mario Valenzuela-Vázquez, Geno A. Picchioni, Leigh W. Murray, and Wayne A. Mackay

d at 21 °C in air and with no preconditioning treatment, desiccation and abscission of flowers at the inflorescence base are observed, by which time the functional vase life has ended ( Davis et al., 1994 ; Mackay et al., 1999 ; Sankhla et al

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Steven A. Altman and Theophanes Solomos

Sim-type carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus L., cv. Elliot's White) continuously treated with 50 mM or 100 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (amitrole) and held in the dark at 18°C did not exhibit a respiratory climacteric relative to dH2O-treated controls. No morphological changes symptomatic of floral senescence appeared in treated flowers until 12-15 days post-harvest. Other triazoles were not effective in prolonging senescence. Amitrole appears to inhibit ethylene biosynthesis by blocking the enzyme-mediated conversion of S-adenosyl-L-methionine to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate. Ethylene action appears to be progressively inhibited in that flowers held in treatment solution for 2 d or less responded to application of 10 uL/L exogenous ethylene whereas flowers held 10 d or longer exhibited no response. Electrophoretic resolution of total crude extracts evidenced protein synthesis as well as degradation. Western analysis and total activity assays showed an amitrole concentration-specific inhibition of catalase activity.

Open access

E. V. Parups and A. P. Chan

Abstract

A floral preservative solution containing iso-ascorbic acid, 100 ppm, sucrose, 4%, and 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate, 50 ppm, extended cut rose life and was equal to other preservative formulations for carnations and snapdragons. Biochemical and other changes in rose petals resulting from the use of this preservative solution are described.

Open access

Chien Yi Wang, James E. Baker, Robert E. Hardenburg, and Morris Lieberman

Abstract

Snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus L.) preconditioned or held in floral preservative solutions containing the ethoxy analog of rhizobitoxine showed reduced ethylene production, reduced flower abscission, and increased vase life. The methoxy analog of rhizobitoxine also inhibited ethylene production and increased vase life of snapdragons, but to a lesser extent. Sodium benzoate at 0.2 mm suppressed ethylene production but did not increase vase life; at 2.0 mm sodium benzoate was toxic to flowers.

Free access

Motoaki Doi and Michael S. Reid

Regardless of their maturity at harvest, the vase life of cut inflorescences of the hybrid Limonium `Fantasia' placed in deionized water was 4 to 5 days. A vase solution containing Physan (a quaternary ammonium disinfectant solution) at 200 μl·liter–1 and 20 g sucrose/liter not only prolonged the longevity of individual florets but also promoted bud opening so that the vase life of cut inflorescences extended to 17 days. Pulse treatment with 100 g sucrose/liter in combination with Physan at 200 μl·liter–1 for 12 hours partially substituted for a continuous supply of sucrose. Including 30 mg gibberellic acid/liter in the vase solution was without benefit.