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Poster Session 52—Postharvest Storage 21 July 2005, 1:15–2:00 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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decreases in firmness could be magnified after processing. Among the methods developed to maintain firmness during ripening and storage of fresh fruits were those that aim to increase fruit calcium (Ca) concentration by preharvest foliar and fruit sprays

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Plums, like other stone fruit, have a limited postharvest life. They are climacteric fruit and undergo rapid deterioration after ripening, including softening, dehydration, and decay. Commercial storage conditions [0–5 °C and 80% to 95% relative

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92 POSTER SESSION 10 (Abstr. 105–119) Postharvest Physiology/Storage/Food Science Tuesday, 25 July, 1:00–2:00 p.m.

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shelf life ( Clark and Finn, 2008 ). For instance, many growers harvest early in the morning to minimize field heat and reduce the time before fruit is placed in cold storage. Some of the most common and potentially devaluing defects in blackberry fruit

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, a grower reported that 1600 tons of sweetpotato roots in storage had a disorder characterized by small brown to black necrotic areas in the flesh near the proximal end of the root, which is where storage roots are removed from the stem ( Dittmar et

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185 μmol·m −2 ·s −1 ) or dark (24 h) conditions at 68 °F until planting. Rhizome storage and culturing were conducted in growth chambers (Percival, Perry, IA or Environmental Growth Chambers, Chagrin Falls, OH). The environmental parameters remained

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`Beauregard' storage roots which were discarded from the Mississippi sweetpotato foundation seed program because of the presence of flesh mutations were bedded in Spring 1991. After the plants were pulled from the roots, the roots were further examined, and the flesh mutations were characterized by size and frequency. The progency from the original roots were examined for flesh mutations for three generations in 1991, 1992, and 1993. The degree of mutation in the original root did not influence the degree of mutation in succeeding generations of storage roots. In 1992 and 1993, the degree of mutation in the third and fourth generation roots did not differ from that of storage roots grown from plants from the foundation seed plant beds.

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Abstract

Pot plants of calamondin (Citrus madurensis Lour.) were dark-stored for 2 weeks at 10° or 20°C. There was considerable leaf and fruit abscission in plants stored at 20°. Plants stored in the dark for 2 weeks at 12° were of excellent quality and leaf and fruit drop was negligible during storage. These plants continued to flourish in a simulated home environment. Horizontal placement of plants during storage increased packing density by 50% without reducing plant quality, compared to plants packed in a vertical position.

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Many plant species grown for cut flowers and foliage have specific postharvest handling guidelines. Implementation of these guidelines helps to maintain or improve quality throughout the supply chain. Keeping cut stems in cold storage is a

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