Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 442 items for :

  • "mechanical harvest" x
  • Refine by Access: User-accessible Content x
Clear All
Free access

Herbert D. Stiles

Three different “shift-trellises” were designed to localize the fruiting zone and to separate it-from vegetative structures. This allows efficient manual harvests by making berries more visible and easier to reach. It improves the quality of manual harvest conditions by reducing human contact with thorns (i.e., prickles).

Better definition of the fruiting zone's dimensions and location, important factors in mechanical harvesting, is possible with these systems. One system allows horizontal placement of the fruiting zone as in the Lincoln Canopy System, but with an inverted orientation of the fruiting shoots. Inverted orientation of fruiting shoots will shorten the distance to the mechanical harvester's collector surface. This changed juxtaposition among trellis components, floricanes and fruiting shoots will eliminate most obstacles against which berries might impinge during their fall to the collector surface. A new kind of agitator may be required to effect fruit removal in this system.

Open access

C. E. Gambrell Jr., E. T. Sims Jr., G. E. Stembridge, and W. H. Rhodes

Abstract

SADH, applied as postbloom sprays to 9 peach cultivars in a series of experiments from 1964 to 1969, accelerated maturation and reduced the number of pickings required for most cultivars. Although SADH did not affect the number of fruits per tree, yield, or fruit size, it advanced the maturity date of ‘Ranger’ as much as a week; that of ‘Blake’ 4 days. ‘Cardinal’, an early cultivar, was not noticeably affected by SADH applied at different stages of development. SADH caused fruit to abscise more readily from the stem and left less fruit remaining on the trees when harvested mechanically. SADH had no detrimental influence on ‘Redglobe’ peaches stored at 50°F for 3 weeks. These effects support the feasibility of using SADH as an aid in mechanically harvesting freestone peaches intended for fresh market.

Free access

Rosana Moreno, Diego S. Intrigliolo, Carlos Ballester, Cruz Garcerá, Enrique Moltó, and Patricia Chueca

could reduce the total costs in 30% to 35% ( Juste et al., 2000 ). Mechanical harvest with continuous canopy or trunk shakers has been used in citrus areas of Florida for years ( Roka et al., 2014a , 2014b ), where 95% of the orange crop is destined to

Full access

Stephanie J. Walker and Paul A. Funk

was followed by a number of additional trials performed by chile growers, processors, and small-scale equipment manufacturers who implemented their own designs or improvements on subsequent designs to strive for more efficient mechanical harvest

Free access

Mark E. Uchanski and Adam Blalock

to stay competitive with domestic and foreign markets. Labor costs have created a shift toward less costly mechanical harvest ( Funk and Walker, 2010 ). Reducing labor inputs by using mechanical harvest technology is one way that New Mexico producers

Open access

Tong Geon Lee, Reza Shekasteband, Naama Menda, Lukas A. Mueller, and Samuel F. Hutton

jointed pedicel tomatoes involves the manual removal of any attached stems from fruit, but jointless pedicels are an essential component for maintaining fruit quality and marketability in cultivars intended for mechanical harvest ( Scott et al., 2013

Open access

Justin R. Morris

Abstract

Mechanization of the blackberry industry has been necessary due to the increasing scarcity and expense of hand-labor which threatened to eliminate blackberries as a processing crop. The Univ. of Arkansas has been a leader in this mechanization effort with the development of a tractor-drawn prototype harvester in 1964 (3, 9). The self-propelled, hydraulically driven commercial model was developed subsequently and is now a prominent harvester in the major production areas of the United States (4). A mechanical pruner for erect blackberries also was developed at the Univ. of Arkansas. This mechanization of harvesting and pruning has allowed, indeed required, the development of an efficient new integrated production system for blackberries (7, 8, 9).

Open access

Denny C. Davis and Azmi Y. Shawa

Abstract

Commercial harvesters of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) caused more berry injury than did a hand scoop. On the Furford Picker-Pruner the major berry injury occurs as the first elevator paddle contacts the berries. Modifications of the elevator on the Furford harvester significantly reduced cranberry harvesting injury on the elevator. Cranberry breakdown during a 5-week storage period was related to the prestorage berry injury level, but cranberry breakdown during an 8-week storage period was unrelated to injury level.

Full access

Travis Robert Alexander, Jaqueline King, Edward Scheenstra, and Carol A. Miles

lacks large commercial-scale fruit production systems and the labor force and skillset that come with them ( Thilmany, 2001 ). Recognizing the need for a mechanical harvest system that could function in Washington cider apple orchards and the potential

Full access

Fumiomi Takeda, Gerard Krewer, Elvin L. Andrews, Benjamin Mullinix Jr, and Donald L. Peterson

hedging equipment and mechanical harvesting systems have been developed [e.g., Advanced Blueberry Concepts, Holland, MI; Blueberry Equipment Inc. (BEI), South Haven, MI; OXBO (Korvan) International Corp., Lynden, WA; Littau Harvester, Stayton, OR; and