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J. Nienhuis, R. L. Lower, and C. H. Miller

Abstract

Two gynoecious pickling cucumber inbred lines, GY 14-2 and GY 2, and 4 hybrids derived from crosses of these gynoecious lines by a monoecious determinate (M 20-2), and a monoecious indeterminate line (M 11) were grown at densities of 1, 2, and 4 plants per hill, all at populations of 84,000 plants/ha. Increasing numbers of plants/hill reduced the percentage of pistillate nodes/plant in all hybrids, the number of flowering nodes in both gynoecious inbred lines and their hybrids, and the percentage of gynoecious plants in both gynoecious inbred lines, and in their hybrids with the determinate M 20-2 line.

Open access

J. R. Baggett, W. A. Frazier, and G. W. Varseveld

Abstract

‘Oregon Trail’ combines ‘Blue Lake’ flavor, color, and texture in a large pod borne on a bush plant. It differs from other bush green bean cultivars (1–5) recently released by Oregon State University in its longer pod and slightly less concentrated bearing habit. ‘Oregon Trail’ is recommended primarily for home gardens but may be useful also for processing or fresh market where large sieve pods are acceptable.

Open access

M. J. Bassett

Abstract

Pod detachment force (PDF) was measured at fresh market maturity (sieve size 4) for the parents, F1, F2, and both backcrosses for the cross ‘Harvester’ × ‘Idelight’. The distribution of the population means for the F1, F2, and backcrosses indicated strongly dominant gene effects were contributed by the ‘Harvester’ parent for high PDF. A minimum of 2 dominant genes controlled PDF and narrow sense heritability was estimated to be 61%.

Open access

W. R. Henderson

Abstract

‘Wolfpack 1’ and ‘Wolfpack 2’ are processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars developed for whole-pack use and adapted to either once-over machine or hand harvest. They were released in Sept. 1984 by the N.C. Agricultural Research Service.

Free access

G.H. Mohamedali and A.H. Nourai

Free access

L.H. Rolston, D.R. La Bonte, W.A. Mulkey, C.A. Clark, J.M. Cannons, and P.W. Wilson

Free access

James R. Baggett, Deborah Kean, and Kathryn Kasimor

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) lines with heads borne above the foliage (exserted) favorably for mechanical harvest were crossed with inbred lines with nonexserted heads. Length of the heads, defined as the portion of the plant above the highest major leaf, was ≈50% of the total plant height in short and tall parents and all plants of the F1, F2, and backcross generations. The principal characteristic identified with good head exsertion was long internodes. Internode length was inherited mostly in an additive manner, with some effect of hybrid vigor apparent in the F1, F2, and backcross to the tall parent. Plant height was also inherited in an additive manner. Head weight in the high-exsertion parent was much lower than in the low-exsertion parent. Within each parent and the F1, head weight was greater in plants with longer internodes and greater plant height. In the segregating generations (F2 and backcross), head weight increased with decreasing internode length, indicating that selection for high head exsertion would result in smaller heads and reduced yield.

Free access

Richard L. Fery and Howard F. Harrison Jr.

Experiments were developed to study the inheritance of the high level of tolerance to the herbicide bentazon exhibited by the pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) cultivar Santaka. Parental, F1, F2, and backcross populations of the cross `Santaka' × `Keystone Resistant Giant' were evaluated for injury in a greenhouse test using bentazon at a rate of 4.5 kg·ha-1 (1.1 kg×ha-1 is the rate recommended for most applications). Additionally, parental and F1 populations were evaluated for injury under field conditions using sequential bentazon applications of 4.5, 4.5, 6.75, and 9.0 kg·ha-1. A single, dominant gene determined tolerance. F1 hybrid plants (heterozygous at the locus conditioning tolerance) exhibited a high level of tolerance under field conditions. Results of the greenhouse test suggested a possible cytoplasmic involvement in the expression of the tolerance gene, but the results of the field test provided strong evidence that cytoplasm does not play a significant role. We propose that this gene be designated Bentazon tolerance and symbolized Bzt. Chemical name used: 3-(1-methylethyl)-(1H)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (bentazon).

Free access

Timothy J Ng, Anita N. Miller, and T.H. Barksdale

A tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) breeding line (81B416) with' resistance to anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum dematium was crossed to three susceptible genotypes. Parental, F1, F2, and backcross populations were analyzed in the cross with `US28', while parental, F1, and F2 populations were tested in crosses of 81B416 with `US141' and 81B9. Inheritance of resistance was primarily additive, but 3- and 6-factor scaling tests indicated the presence of dominance and epistatic effects. The average broad-sense heritability estimate was 0.57; narrow-sense heritability was estimated at 0.42.