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Open access

J. P. Gilreath and B. K. Harbaugh

Abstract

Eight herbicides were evaluated for phytotoxicity to field grown ‘Candidium’ caladiums (Caladium × hortulanum Birdsey) in 1983. The 4 most promising or currently used herbicides were evaluated for weed control and phytotoxicity in 1984. During 1984, 4 applications of 2.24 kg/ha alachlor, 2.24 kg/ha simazine, 1.68 kg/ha oryzalin, and 0.56 kg/ha oxyfluorfen, all in combination with 1 postemergence application of 0.28 kg/ha fluazifop-butyl, were applied to caladiums. Alachlor and oxyfluorfen provided poor weed control and reduced plant vigor, tuber weights, and tuber size in 1984. Simazine provided good weed control, but reduced plant vigor and yield. Oryazlin provided excellent weed control without crop injury. Chemical names used: 2-chloro-N-(2,6-diethylphenyl)-N-(methoxymethyl)acetamide (alachlor); 6-chloro-N,N’-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine); 4-(dipropylamino)-3,5-dinitrobenzene sulfonamide (oryzalin); 2-chloro-l-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzene (oxyfluorfen); butyl-2-[4-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]oxy] phenoxy] propanoate (fluazifop-butyl).

Open access

James P. Gilreath

Abstract

Preemergence herbicides for weed control in field-grown statice [Limonium sinuatum (L.) Mill.], applied pretransplant, with a second posttransplant application over the top of the crop before flowering, were evaluated. DCPA, oxadiazon, and oxyfluorfen generally provided safe, efficacious weed control in the first experiment (1984) and were further evaluated in the second experiment (1985), wherein crop vigor and yield were not reduced. Control of most weeds was good with DCPA, oxadiazon, and oxyfluorfen; however, crabgrass [Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop.] control with oxyfluorfen was inconsistent in both experiments and decreased late in the season. Chemical names used: dimethyl 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzene-dicarboxylate (DCPA); 3-[2,4-dichloro-5-(1-methylethoxy)phenyl]-5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-(3H)-one (oxadiazon); 2-chloro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene (oxyfluorfen).

Free access

Hamid Reza Rajablarijani, Bahram Mirshekari, Majid AghaAlikhani, Varahram Rashidi, and Farhad Farahvash

States to extend the availability of fresh produce for marketing and processing ( Williams, 2008 ). Use of variable sowing dates to control weeds is dependent on time of weed emergence. An awareness of the timing of weed emergence facilitates the planting

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Gregory R. Armel, Robert J. Richardson, Henry P. Wilson, Brian W. Trader, Cory M. Whaley, and Thomas E. Hines

level of weed control may not always be achieved with the use of herbicides applied before weed emergence ( Amador-Ramirez, 2002 ). However, the majority of the herbicides available for weed control in pepper are only selective to pepper when applied as

Open access

Gursewak Singh, William Patrick Wechter, Bhupinder Singh Farmaha, and Matthew Cutulle

polyethylene mulch production systems ( Duniway, 2002 ; Schneider et al., 2003 ). The phaseout of methyl bromide due to health and environmental concerns has complicated weed management, especially control of nutsedge species in polyethylene mulch vegetable

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James T. Brosnan and Gregory K. Breeden

Pyrimisulfan is a sulfonanilide herbicidal inhibitor of ALS with structural similarity to bispyribac-sodium and pyrithiobac-sodium ( Asakura et al., 2012 ). Pyrimisulfan is used for both pre- and postemergence weed control in rice ( Oryza stricta L

Open access

Ping Yu and Stephen Christopher Marble

). Thus, nonchemical (mainly mulches) and integrated weed control method (herbicide + mulches) need to be further evaluated ( Yu and Marble, 2022 ). In recent years, researchers have again been exploring using nonchemical or integrated weed control

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W. Carroll Johnson III and Jerry W. Davis

Organic production systems rely heavily on cultural and mechanical weed control, with minimal dependence on herbicides that are approved for use in certified organic crops. Herbicides allowed for use in certified organic production systems are

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John Wilhoit and Timothy Coolong

, 2005 ; Ngouajio and McGiffen, 2004 ). Currently, polyethylene (plastic) film-mulches are the primary mulch used in vegetable production for in-row weed control; however, weed control between rows can be a significant challenge for some producers. Weeds

Open access

S. Christopher Marble, Shawn T. Steed, Debalina Saha, and Yuvraj Khamare

Weed management in container plant production is challenging, primarily due to limited postemergence herbicide options and the consequential need for supplemental hand weeding ( Case et al., 2005 ). Currently, weed control in container nurseries is