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Open access

R. G. Gardner

Abstract

‘Summit’ is a late-season, determinate, fresh-market tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) developed at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research Station, Fletcher, N.C. ‘Summit’ is adapted to ground and stake culture for mature-green and vine-ripe harvest. It was evaluated in North Carolina as NC 7993-5-39-1W-1R and in the Southern Tomato Exchange Program (STEP) as STEP 671.

Open access

M. H. Dickson

Abstract

A major cost factor in the production of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis L.) is the need to tie leaves to avoid brown discoloration of the curd due to the peroxidase activation by sunlight (3). Even lines with a good self wrapping character need tieing, as small cracks between the leaves can permit light to reach the curd and result in a discolored patch or streak. The persistent white curd character (2), obtained from PI 183214 from Egypt, eliminates the need to tie leaves to produce a white curd, making cauliflower production simple and relatively inexpensive. NY 7642 is an early, persistent white-type cauliflower, released in Apr. 1984 by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

Open access

James R. Baggett and D. Kean

Abstract

‘Marbles’ and ‘Riot’ are dwarf peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) developed at Corvallis, Ore. on the research farms of the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station. They bear prolific crops of attractive, brightly colored fruit on a compact plant, and are suitable for culture as bedding plants to provide fall color in the landscape.

Open access

L. M. Pike, R. S. Horn, C. R. Andersen, P. W. Leeper, and M. E. Miller

Abstract

The development of a high yielding, pink root resistant, medium length storage shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality and maturing slightly later than ‘Texas Early Grano 502’ (TEG502) was the objective in the development of this cultivar. ‘Texas Grano 1025Y’ (TG1025Y) extends the South Texas onion season by 7 to 10 days beyond the ‘TEG502’ maturity season.

Open access

L. M. Pike, R. S. Horn, C. R. Andersen, P. W. Leeper, and M. E. Miller

Abstract

The development of a late maturing, high yielding, disease resistant shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality and medium length storage characteristics was the objective leading to selection and increase of this cultivar.

Open access

L. M. Pike, R. S. Horn, C. R. Andersen, P. W. Leeper, and M. E. Miller

Abstract

The development of a high yielding, pink root-resistant [Pyrenochaeta terrestris (Hansen) Gorenz, Walker, and Larson], mild, sweet, shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality was the objective for the onion breeding program in the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Texas Grano 1015Y’ (TG1015Y) is a very mild and sweet cultivar with those quality characteristics.

Open access

J. R. Baggett and D. Kean

Abstract

Fifteen broccoli (Brassica oleraceae L. Italica Group) breeding lines, OSU 101–OSU 115, have been released for use by commercial breeders. Favorable combining ability has been shown by various experimental hybrid combinations among these lines and between these lines and clubroot resistant Oregon State Univ. (OSU) lines released concurrently and described separately (2). This group of lines includes a range of characteristics which should be useful for breeding or direct use in F1 hybrids, including upright growth habit with good head exsertion for efficient harvest, excellent blue-green color, deeply branched heads, desirable bud type, earliness, and some resistance to downy mildew.

Open access

J. McFerran, M. J. Goode, S. J. Scott, and F. W. Montgomery

Abstract

‘Ozark Pink’ VF is an indeterminate, pink-fruited tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) developed at the Univ. of Arkansas to replace ‘Traveler 76’ (2), which is susceptible to verticillium wilt. ‘Ozark Pink’ provides the excellent flavor quality of traditional Arkansas pink tomatoes with improved fruit size and disease resistance over ‘Traveler 76’. Fruits also are larger and firmer than ‘VF Pink’ (3), which was grown primarily in southeastern Arkansas. ‘Ozark Pink’ is adapted to stake culture and vine-ripe harvest for local market, shipping short distances and for home gardens throughout Arkansas and the Ozark Mountain area. Pink cultivars remain the most popular type sold as bedding plants and at roadside stands in Arkansas, although part of the commercial acreage now grows red-fruited cultivars.

Open access

James L. Brewbaker

Abstract

‘Hawaiian Super-sweet #9’ is a high-sucrose vegetable corn cultivar bred for the tropics, based on the gene brittle-1. It is harvestable over a longer period than traditional sweet corns (sugary-1) and retains its quality much longer following harvest. It produces high yields on plants of a field corn appearance, with high lodging resistance, low ear position, and large seeds on well-covered ears.

Open access

R. A. Jones and A. H. Millett

Abstract

‘Sierra Sweet’ is an attractive, fresh market tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) developed for high soluble-solids content in ripe fruit, an important contributor to tomato flavor. ‘Sierra Sweet’ has value as a germplasm source for enhanced soluble solids and multiple disease resistance as well as a parent in the production of commercial hybrids.