Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 621 items for :

  • "vegetable breeding" x
Clear All

Abstract

The development of a high yielding, pink root-resistant [Pyrenochaeta terrestris (Hansen) Gorenz, Walker, and Larson], mild, sweet, shortday onion (Allium cepa L.) with improved shipping quality was the objective for the onion breeding program in the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Texas Grano 1015Y’ (TG1015Y) is a very mild and sweet cultivar with those quality characteristics.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Fifteen broccoli (Brassica oleraceae L. Italica Group) breeding lines, OSU 101–OSU 115, have been released for use by commercial breeders. Favorable combining ability has been shown by various experimental hybrid combinations among these lines and between these lines and clubroot resistant Oregon State Univ. (OSU) lines released concurrently and described separately (2). This group of lines includes a range of characteristics which should be useful for breeding or direct use in F1 hybrids, including upright growth habit with good head exsertion for efficient harvest, excellent blue-green color, deeply branched heads, desirable bud type, earliness, and some resistance to downy mildew.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Ozark Pink’ VF is an indeterminate, pink-fruited tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) developed at the Univ. of Arkansas to replace ‘Traveler 76’ (2), which is susceptible to verticillium wilt. ‘Ozark Pink’ provides the excellent flavor quality of traditional Arkansas pink tomatoes with improved fruit size and disease resistance over ‘Traveler 76’. Fruits also are larger and firmer than ‘VF Pink’ (3), which was grown primarily in southeastern Arkansas. ‘Ozark Pink’ is adapted to stake culture and vine-ripe harvest for local market, shipping short distances and for home gardens throughout Arkansas and the Ozark Mountain area. Pink cultivars remain the most popular type sold as bedding plants and at roadside stands in Arkansas, although part of the commercial acreage now grows red-fruited cultivars.

Open Access

Abstract

Combining ability estimates for characters relating to yield and fruit quality were undertaken to determine if lines derived from Cucumis sativus var. hardwickii (R.) Alef. (hardwickii) could be used in the development of higher-yielding commercial cucumbers. General and specific combining ability estimates were obtained in a North Carolina Design II experiment for nine near-homozygous processing cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) lines, five of which were derived from hardwickii germplasm. Lines were evaluated under two planting densities (29,000 and 58,000 plants/ha) for three harvests, and environments sampled were two planting times (2 weeks apart within the same year). Traits evaluated included fruit number per plant, primary lateral branch number, percentage of pistillate flowers, days to anthesis, fruit length, and fruit length : diameter (L:D) ratio. General combining ability (GCA) mean squares were significant at both planting densities for all traits when combined over planting times, except for fruit L:D ratio at the higher density. Specific combining ability mean squares were significant for days to anthesis. Of the lines evaluated, WI 2963 and 4H261 produced the greatest GCA female and male effects, respectively, for three harvest yield and primary lateral branch number, but the lowest effects for fruit size. Our results suggest that further selection within these high-performance hardwickii derivatives for fruit shape will produce lines that perform well at a high planting density when crossed with sativus lines having good general combining ability.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Hawaiian Super-sweet #9’ is a high-sucrose vegetable corn cultivar bred for the tropics, based on the gene brittle-1. It is harvestable over a longer period than traditional sweet corns (sugary-1) and retains its quality much longer following harvest. It produces high yields on plants of a field corn appearance, with high lodging resistance, low ear position, and large seeds on well-covered ears.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

‘Sierra Sweet’ is an attractive, fresh market tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) developed for high soluble-solids content in ripe fruit, an important contributor to tomato flavor. ‘Sierra Sweet’ has value as a germplasm source for enhanced soluble solids and multiple disease resistance as well as a parent in the production of commercial hybrids.

Open Access

Abstract

Two gynoecious pickling cucumber inbred lines, GY 14-2 and GY 2, and 4 hybrids derived from crosses of these gynoecious lines by a monoecious determinate (M 20-2), and a monoecious indeterminate line (M 11) were grown at densities of 1, 2, and 4 plants per hill, all at populations of 84,000 plants/ha. Increasing numbers of plants/hill reduced the percentage of pistillate nodes/plant in all hybrids, the number of flowering nodes in both gynoecious inbred lines and their hybrids, and the percentage of gynoecious plants in both gynoecious inbred lines, and in their hybrids with the determinate M 20-2 line.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon Trail’ combines ‘Blue Lake’ flavor, color, and texture in a large pod borne on a bush plant. It differs from other bush green bean cultivars (1–5) recently released by Oregon State University in its longer pod and slightly less concentrated bearing habit. ‘Oregon Trail’ is recommended primarily for home gardens but may be useful also for processing or fresh market where large sieve pods are acceptable.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

Pod detachment force (PDF) was measured at fresh market maturity (sieve size 4) for the parents, F1, F2, and both backcrosses for the cross ‘Harvester’ × ‘Idelight’. The distribution of the population means for the F1, F2, and backcrosses indicated strongly dominant gene effects were contributed by the ‘Harvester’ parent for high PDF. A minimum of 2 dominant genes controlled PDF and narrow sense heritability was estimated to be 61%.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

‘Wolfpack 1’ and ‘Wolfpack 2’ are processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars developed for whole-pack use and adapted to either once-over machine or hand harvest. They were released in Sept. 1984 by the N.C. Agricultural Research Service.

Open Access