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Lyn A. Gettys

Non-native invasive species pose a significant threat to aquatic ecosystems and can disrupt the use of invaded systems. For example, alien plants often outcompete indigenous flora and form monocultures that cannot be used by native fauna, which

Open access

Aaron G. Anderson, Isabella Messer, and Gail A. Langellotto

ecological gardening efforts is the inclusion of native plants in landscape design ( Uren et al., 2015 ). Research suggests that gardens composed of native plants are associated with higher native insect β-diversity (the change in species diversity between

Open access

Michael A. Schnelle

owners favored exotics over natives. Conflicting “invasive” definitions Experts’ opinions or definitions as to what constitutes an invasive plant vary widely and is a contentious issue among academics ( Frank, 2019 ; Richardson et al., 2008

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Hector Eduardo Pérez, Carrie Reinhardt Adams, Michael E. Kane, Jeffrey G. Norcini, Glenn Acomb, and Claudia Larsen

is the rising demand and use of native plants ( Brzuszek and Harkess, 2009 ; Brzuszek et al., 2007 ). For instance, the estimated sales value of native plants in Florida during 1997 was about $106 million, by 2005, sales reached about $316 million

Free access

Iro Kokkinou, Nikolaos Ntoulas, Panayiotis A. Nektarios, and Dimitra Varela

. Plant species for either extensive or adaptive green roof systems should be preferably native and adapted to local environmental conditions. Dimopoulos et al. (2013) reported that the prolific flora of Greece consists of 5752 kinds of plant species

Open access

Michael A. Schnelle

In most settings, native germplasm proves, in the worst-case scenario, to be “weedy” and, occasionally, invasive. A weed is normally defined as a plant, native or non-native, that is not valued where it is growing ( U.S. Department of Agriculture

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Lee Elder and Robert Gorman

About 333 people in the Anchorage area are involved in landscaping and landscape architecture, while about 18% of all farms in Alaska are considered greenhouse and nursery farms. These greenhouse and nursery farms account for $12.7 million in annual sales and comprise 28% of total Alaska agricultural sales. Alaskan horticulture producers have little industry knowledge of landscapers' and landscape architects' demand for Alaska native plants. This survey attempted to uncover the amounts of specific native Alaska varieties of shrubs, trees, herbaceous plants, and ferns that landscapers and landscape architects used in 2004, while also asking what types of plants they would like to use if a consistent supply was established. Landscapers' and landscape architects' business activities and perceptions are also evaluated. Surveys were distributed electronically as well as by standard mail to 165 landscapers and landscape architects in the Anchorage area. An overall 12% response rate provided insight into the commercial demand for Alaska native plant varieties.

Open access

Lyn A. Gettys and Kimberly A. Moore

Projects that focus on restoration, mitigation, and enhancement of aquatic and wetland regions provide valuable ecosystem services and habitat for native flora and fauna ( Brix, 1994 ). These projects call for a mixture of plant types and sizes to

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Pragati Shrestha and Jessica D. Lubell

The sustainable landscape featuring native plants is a rapidly expanding trend in horticulture. Native plants support wildlife, including pollinators, and are not invasive ( Tallamy, 2007 ). Some of the most popular and widely used plants for

Free access

Allen D. Owings, Charles E. Johnson, and M. LeRon Robbins

Educational and research opportunities utilizing native plant species are being developed by the LSU Agricultural Center through the recent establishment of a native plant arboretum at the Calhoun Research Station. Plants indigenous to Louisiana and surrounding states are being collected and planted in the arboretum for evaluation of potential values for landscaping, in food industries, and/or wildlife management. Native trees being studied include species of oak (Quercus), maple (Acer), hickory (Carya), and dogwood (Cornus). Lesser known species of holly (Ilex) and hawthorn (Crataegus), are being evaluated for commercial production and landscape potential. Fruit being collected for field orchard studies include mayhaw (Crataegus opaca), pawpaw (Asimina triloba), and several native plums (Prunus spp.).