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Open access

A. M. Rhodes

Abstract

Cultivars of Cucurbita mixta Pang, have been slowly disappearing from listings in seed catalogs in the United States. Several years ago 4 cultivars were listed: ‘Green Striped Cushaw’, ‘White Cushaw,’ ‘Japanese Pie,’ and ‘Tennessee Sweet Potato.’ Today, ‘Green Striped Cushaw’ is occasionally listed. Of the other 3 cultivars, the author has recently seen only fruits of ‘White Cushaw’, which were produced by growers who save their own seed. Although these 4 cultivars of C. mixta are productive, they are very susceptible to powdery mildew, which may account for their decline in popularity.

Open access

Booker T. Whatley and Bobby R. Phills

Abstract

The ‘Carver’ sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Lam) has been released by Tuskegee Institute to fill a need for a cultivar possessing high resistance to fusarium wilt, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. batatas, and intermediate resistance to the southern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita. ‘Carver’ is a dual purpose cultivar, suited for both fresh and processing market (Fig. 1), and it is well adapted to Alabama growing conditions.

Open access

J. R. Baggett, W. A. Frazier, and G. W. Varseveld

Abstract

‘Oregon 91’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon. It results from 22 years of breeding to develop bush bean cultivars with pod characteristics of ‘Blue Lake’ pole bean and an acceptable growth habit. ‘Oregon 91’ should complement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ type which has been important to Oregon processors because of its earliness and dependable production. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 91’ is slightly later in maturity and slightly less productive, but has a better growth habit and straighter pods. It should be most useful to processors who need pods of smaller diameter than those of ‘Orergon 1604’.

Open access

Alfred Jones, P. D. Dukes, M. G. Hamilton, and R. A. Baumgardner

Abstract

Six sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) lines with a wide range of objectionable fiber content were grown in one location in 1976 and in 2 locations in 1977 to study factors influencing the expression of that trait. We failed to identify environmental factors that would enhance expression of objectionable fiber but did find that large roots tended to have more objectionable fiber than did smaller roots. All roots of high fiber lines did not express objectionable amounts. About 10 US #1 but only 4 jumbo roots of each line would have to be evaluated to have a 95% probability of observing objectionable fiber in high fiber lines. However, Jumbo, US #1 and canning sizes all led to the same relative rankings of lines. Subjective evaluations of baked roots were as effective as objective laboratory tests and could be obtained concurrent with other necessary baking evaluations.

Open access

D. L. Garwood and R. G. Creech

Abstract

‘Pennfresh ADX’ is a high-sugar sweet corn hybrid (Zea mays L.) based on the recessive endosperm gene combination amylose-extender (ae) dull (du) waxy (wx). The effects of this gene interaction on starch and sugar properties were reported by Creech (1). This hybrid can be harvested over a longer period than traditional sweet corns which are homozygous for the sugary (su) gene, and it retains its quality much longer following harvest. The symbol ADX is derived from these 3 gene names and is used to delineate this new class of sweet corn hybrids.

Open access

P. J. Ito and O. K. Atubra

Abstract

‘Dokodoko’ is a new watermelon (citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) selected for its adaptation to the humid tropics with close to 10% soluble solids. The name ‘Dokodoko’ in Ghanian means very sweet.

Free access

G.H. Mohamedali and A.H. Nourai

Free access

L.H. Rolston, D.R. La Bonte, W.A. Mulkey, C.A. Clark, J.M. Cannons, and P.W. Wilson

Free access

James R. Baggett, Deborah Kean, and Kathryn Kasimor

Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. Italica Group) lines with heads borne above the foliage (exserted) favorably for mechanical harvest were crossed with inbred lines with nonexserted heads. Length of the heads, defined as the portion of the plant above the highest major leaf, was ≈50% of the total plant height in short and tall parents and all plants of the F1, F2, and backcross generations. The principal characteristic identified with good head exsertion was long internodes. Internode length was inherited mostly in an additive manner, with some effect of hybrid vigor apparent in the F1, F2, and backcross to the tall parent. Plant height was also inherited in an additive manner. Head weight in the high-exsertion parent was much lower than in the low-exsertion parent. Within each parent and the F1, head weight was greater in plants with longer internodes and greater plant height. In the segregating generations (F2 and backcross), head weight increased with decreasing internode length, indicating that selection for high head exsertion would result in smaller heads and reduced yield.