Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45 items for

  • Author or Editor: Steven E. Newman x
  • Refine by Access: User-accessible Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Steven E. Newman

Hypertext applications have grown from highlighted index referencing tools used in “help” windows to sophisticated file sharing between many computers linked via the World Wide Web (WWW). Software such as Mosaic makes this link easy and convenient by using “Hypertext Markup Language” (HTML). Most universities and many companies have installed WWW servers and have provided disk space for general use. Horticulture departments and many botanical gardens across the country and all over the world are adapting to this technology by providing access to extension information sheets, newsletters, and selected manuscripts. Pesticide chemical manufacturers are also establishing WWW servers with the intent on providing rapid access to pesticide labels and material safety data sheets (MSDS). For local classroom use, HTML using a WWW server can provide an innovative and alternative means for delivering lecture material.

Free access

Steven E. Newman

Scaling from dissolved and suspended solids in irrigation water reduces the efficiency of greenhouse irrigation systems. Water deposits inside pipes reduce water flow and deposits may reduce the flow through irrigation emitters, often clogging them. If not properly maintained, the clogging of emitters requires constant maintenance. This results in considerable labor expense and/or emitter replacement. Scaling inside irrigation system pipes also has the potential to harbor plant pathogens from the resulting biofilms. Oxcide, a novel hypochlorous acid (HOCl) compound, is produced electrochemically by removing sodium and hydroxide from sodium hypochlorite. The elimination of sodium hydroxide from the product creates a nontoxic oxidizer. A system to inject Oxcide into irrigation water at a commercial Colorado greenhouse was installed to maintain irrigation efficiency of emitters and irrigation lines during Winter 2003. The oxidation reduction potential (ORP) was monitored and visual evaluations of irrigation equipment in the Oxcide treated zones compared to those zones not treated with Oxcide was conducted. During January through March, geranium stock plants were irrigated with water that maintained ORP levels at around 600 mV. Visual ratings of the irrigation emitters revealed that the injection of Oxcide in the irrigation water did reduce the level of deposition. Deposition on the main feed lines was so thick that they hindered the complete closure of existing valves. Treatment of the irrigation water Oxcide injection for six months successfully removed of the scale and deposits from the water line.

Free access

Andrea Crowell and Steven E. Newman

The cut-flower industry is continually searching for unique products to introduce to the floral industry. Our objective was to select potential species for trial as new greenhouse-grown alternative cut flowers. Hardy perennials from the Rock/Alpine Garden at the Denver Botanical Garden served as the selection pool. Plants in this collection were fitting due to their durability in Colorado conditions and their rugged unique beauty. Several trial cuts of potential species were taken, and the flowers were evaluated for flower size, stem length, stem strength, foliage, vase life, usefulness, and general aesthetic quality. Next, an informal survey of growers, retailers, researchers, and consumers was taken to determine which flowers had already been seen on the market and which flowers would be potentially successful in the trade. After assimilating the information, the following six species were selected for trial future greenhouse production: Anthyllis vulneraria, Dianthus giganteus, Diascia integerrima, Echium lusitanium, Heuchera sanguinea `Bressingham Hybrids', and Trollius yunnanensis.

Free access

Muhammad Maqbool and Steven E. Newman

Twelve snapdragon cultivars of different response groups were grown in a double polyethylene greenhouse to determine the impact of no root-zone heat (RZH) and 22C RZH at 15 or 20C night air temperature (NT) on flower quality. Data were recorded when the first floret of each stem showed color and harvested when the lower third of the florets were open, Flower quality was evaluated at harvest based upon stem length and fresh weight using Society of American Florists standards. Cultivars `Butterfly White II', `Hercules', `Navajo', and West Virginia' (Group II) were the first to bloom under 20C NT regardless of RZH; whereas cultivars `Oklahoma', Houston', and `Potomac Pink' (Group IV) were delayed. Similar trends were observed under 15C NT, but the crop was harvested a few days earlier with RZH as compared to no heat. Flower quality was better under 15C NT.

Free access

Brad B. Hawcroft and Steven E. Newman

Kenaf is an alternative fiber crop being evaluated in Mississippi. Kenaf, primarily grown in Asia, can be used in the manufacture of paper, fiber board, acoustical tiles and compost. The bark is the source of the fiber used, leaving the fiber core or pith for use as a paper additive, poultry litter, or is discarded. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential use of kenaf fiber core as a vermiculite substitute in a sphagnum peat moss-based medium.

Plugs of Celosia argentea, Viola × wittrockiana, and Impatiens wallerana were transplanted into 10 cm pots containing 5 different sphagnum peat moss-based media modified with the milled fiber core (pith) of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) and/or vermiculite. The media were as follows: 5 peat: 0 kenaf : 5 vermiculite (v/v/v); 5 peat : 1 kenaf : 4 vermiculite (v/v/v); 5 peat : 2 kenaf : 3 vermiculite (v/v/v); 5 peat : 3 kenaf : 2 vermiculite (v/v/v); 5 peat : 4 kenaf : 1 vermiculite (v/v/v); and 5 peat : 5 kenaf: 0 vermiculite (v/v/v). Water holding capacity, pore space, pH and media shrinkage were monitored throughout the study along with plant growth and plant quality.

Free access

C. Elizabeth Succop and Steven E. Newman

Fresh-market basil is becoming a viable greenhouse commodity in Colorado. Marketing pressures and profit advantages also encourage the production of certified organic produce. The research objectives were to determine the length of time basil plants were productive in the greenhouse and to compare the production of fresh-market basil grown with three root zone systems and two fertilizer treatments. The three systems were hydroponic rockwool slab culture, hydroponic perlite raised bed culture, and hydroponic peat/perlite/compost bag culture. The two types of hydroponic fertilizer treatments were an inorganically formulated nutrient solution and an organic solution consisting of fermented poultry compost, hydrolized fish emulsion, and soluble kelp. The plants were harvested once per week and fresh weight was determined. During the 2nd and 3rd months of harvest, productivity from the plants treated with the organic fertilizer was greatest in the perlite system. However, productivity from the plants treated with the traditional fertilizer was greatest in the bag mix and rockwool systems.

Free access

C. Elizabeth Succop and Steven E. Newman

During 1995, 33 poinsettia cultivars were evaluated for Colorado greenhouse production conditions. Plants were supplied by the Paul Ecke Poinsettia Ranch, Fischer Geraniums USA, Oglevee, and Mikkelsens. At the end of the production period, Colorado greenhouse growers were invited to an open house and asked to judge the cultivars for plant, bract, and cyathia quality. As rated by the 24 growers, the best red cultivars in overall performance were `Freedom Red', `Nutcracker Red', `Cortez', and `Bonita', respectively. The best pink cultivars in overall performance were `Nutcracker Pink', `Maren', and `Flirt', respectively. The best white cultivars in overall performance were `Nutcracker White' and `V-17 Angelika White', respectively. The best novelty cultivars in overall performance were `Puebla' and `Monet', respectively.

Free access

Jesse R. Quarrels and Steven E. Newman

A leaching frame was constructed to detect residual plant growth regulators in media. The table was 0.9 × 1.8 m and designed to hold 40 10-cm diameter by 30-cm PVC cylinders. Each cylinder was cut lengthwise in half and resealed with duct tape. Rooted cuttings of `Freedom' poinsettias were planted into each cylinder using two media combinations: 2 vermiculite: 2 peat moss: 1 pine bark and 2 vermiculite: 1 peat moss: 2 pine bark (by volume). Four growth regulator treatments were applied to the medium two weeks after transplanting: control, 0.25 mg paclobutrazol, 0.25 mg uniconazole, and 0.125 mg paclobutrazol applied as spike. After plant growth was recorded, the cylinders were removed and sliced lengthwise. Snapdragon plugs were then transplanted into the medium along the length of the cylinder to determine if any residual paclobutrazol remained. Paclobutrazol and uniconazole reduced stem length. The presence of pine bark in the media reduced the effect of the plant growth regulators.

Free access

D. Clay Collins and Steven E. Newman

The Leaf Wetness Data Logger (LWL) and accompanying Logbook software were designed by Spectrum Technologies Inc. as a low-maintenance tool to aid in disease prediction and spray scheduling for outdoor field-grown crops. The LWL mimics leaf surface moisture represented as a value between 0 (dry) and 15 (wet). We explored an expanded use of the LWL to large-scale commercial greenhouses for the purpose of humidity control and disease prevention. Data were collected over 15 days in a commercial hydroponic tomato production greenhouse and repeated. Results indicated that leaf wetness, as determined by the LWL, increased during irrigation periods, with cumulative effects dependent on daily irrigation requirements and climate. Irrigation was controlled by the climate control computer in response to cumulative radiation intensity. By analyzing leaf wetness in correlation with climatic conditions, more adequate irrigation scheduling may be implemented, reducing the risk of disease spread and infection.

Free access

Allen D. Owings and Steven E. Newman

The action of foliar-applied uniconazole, paclobutrazol, dikegulac-sodium, ancymidol, 6-BA, GA4+7, and 6-BA + GA4+7 On container–grown Photinia × fraseri was studied over a one year period. Vegetative growth habit was evaluated at three month intervals. Shoot dry weight and histological examination of stern anatomy in the apical meristematic region was conducted at experiment termination.

Several plant growth regulators, primarily uniconazole, 6-BA, 6-BA + GA4+7, and dikegulac-sodium, stimulated lateral branching. Linear increases in lateral branching occurred as application rates increased. High application rates of uniconazole and paclobutrazol created an asymmetrical growth habit and decreased dry weight accumulation.