Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for

  • Author or Editor: Richard H. Mattson x
  • Refine by Access: User-accessible Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Eunhee Kim and Richard H. Mattson

Psychophysiological responses to geranium visual stimuli were analyzed on female college students with low attentiveness. Alpha and fast-beta brain wave activities, electrodermal activities, and skin temperature were measured continuously during a 5-min baseline, a 10-min induced stressor, and a 5-min treatment. Each of 75 female college students viewed a film of a stressful human situation—an induced stressor, then was exposed to a randomly assigned treatment: red-flowering geraniums, nonflowering geraniums, or no plants. Based on responses to the induced stressor, students were placed into non-, mild-, and high-induced stress groups. Regression models of psychophysiological responses to each treatment were developed for over-all stress levels. Non-induced stress female students exposed to red-flowering geraniums in contrast to nonflowering geraniums and no-plants showed greater fast-beta brain wave activity. Greater fast-beta of non-induced stress female students exposed red-flowering geraniums was associated with increased positive attention and not because of increased stressful tension. This conclusion was supported by more positive emotional states self-reported using the Zuckerman Inventory of Personal Reactions. Conclusive findings from over-all stress levels suggest that benefits of viewing red-flowering geraniums occur to both nonstress and high stress female college students; red-flowering geraniums improve positive attention of female students with no stress (low attentiveness) and enhance stress recovery of female students with high stress (tension).

Open access

Richard H. Mattson and Richard E. Widmer

Abstract

Four Rosa hybrida cultivars were grown in 100 to 500, 700 to 1300, and 1500 to 2500 ppm CO2 atmospheres for at least half the daylight hours from November to May. Production was studied continually for 24 months.

Numbers of flowering stems and lateral buds, fresh weight, and stem length were greater in CO2 supplemented atmospheres on hybrid tea and floribunda roses. Non-flowering percentages were lower for floribundas in CO2 enriched atmospheres. Greater leaf abscission and less root development were noted for hybrid tea and floribunda roses in 1500 to 2500 ppm CO2. Higher yields in non-CO2 supplementation periods (May to October) largely reflected growing conditions rather than CO2 effects.

Open access

Richard H. Mattson and Richard E. Widmer

Abstract

Cut flower yield of four greenhouse rose cultivars was primarily influenced by solar radiation, while atmospheric CO2, air temperature, and soil nutrient levels were of lesser importance. Cultivars responded differently to atmospheric CO2 level and soil fertilization method. Roses fertilized with 20-20-20 in solution produced equivalent or greater flower yields than roses fertilized with 10-10-10 in dry form. Roses grown in CO2 enriched atmospheres did not require additional soil fertilization.

Regression coefficients and yield prediction equations were determined using nine environmental parameters. Monthly yield predictions were generally reliable, but cropping cycles and cultural practices decreased accuracy.

Open access

Richard H. Mattson and Richard E. Widmer

Abstract

Vase life and floral characteristics were studied for Rosa hybrida (cvs. Forever Yours, Briarcliff Supreme, Red Garnette, and Rose Elf) flowers grown in atmospheres containing 300 ± 200, 1000 ± 300, and 2000 ± 500 ppm CO2 for at least half of the daylight hours. Only ‘Red Garnette’ flowers grown in CO2-supplemented air had significantly longer vase life (one-half day) than those produced in normal atmospheres.

Full access

Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

Using various medical and psychological measurements, this study performed a randomized clinical trial with surgical patients to evaluate if plants in hospital rooms have therapeutic influences. Ninety patients recovering from an appendectomy were randomly assigned to hospital rooms with or without plants. Patients in the plant treatment room viewed eight species of foliage and flowering plants during their postoperative recovery periods. Data collected for each patient included length of hospitalization, analgesics used for postoperative pain control, vital signs, ratings of pain intensity, pain distress, anxiety, and fatigue, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y-1, the Environmental Assessment Scale, and the Patient's Room Satisfaction Questionnaire. Patients in hospital rooms with plants and flowers had significantly fewer intakes of postoperative analgesics, more positive physiological responses evidenced by lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate, lower ratings of pain, anxiety, and fatigue, and more positive feelings and higher satisfaction about their rooms when compared with patients in the control group. Findings of this research suggested that plants in a hospital environment could be noninvasive, inexpensive, and an effective complementary medicine for patients recovering from abdominal surgery.

Free access

Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

Medical and psychological measurements of surgical patients were tested to determine the influence of plants and flowers within hospital rooms. Eighty female patients recovering from a thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to either control or plant rooms. Patients in the plant room viewed 12 foliage and flowering plants during their postoperative recovery periods. Data collected for each patient included length of hospitalization, analgesics used for postoperative pain control, vital signs, ratings of pain intensity, pain distress, anxiety and fatigue, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form Y-1, the Environmental Assessment Scale, and the Patient's Room Satisfaction Questionnaire. Patients in hospital rooms with plants and flowers had significantly shorter hospitalizations, fewer intakes of analgesics, lower ratings of pain, anxiety, and fatigue, and more positive feelings and higher satisfaction about their rooms when compared with patients in the control group. Findings of this research suggest the therapeutic value of plants in the hospital environment as an effective complementary medicine for surgical patients.

Open access

Richard H. Mattson and Thomas J. Maxwell

Abstract

Shadows were photographed in a wire-model greenhouse oriented in N-S, E-W, and NE to SW (45°) directions in a heliodon which simulated 39° N latitude. Photographs were taken at 2 hr intervals during morning hours of winter and summer solstices. E-W greenhouses cast fewer shadows than other orientations during the winter solstice. Similar amounts of shadows occurred in all orientations during the summer solstice.

Open access

Isabell Hsu Cheng and Richard H. Mattson

Abstract

A complete 4 × 4 diallel showed significant self-incompatibility and reciprocal differences in L. × ‘Mid-Century’ hybrid lily crosses. For all crosses, normal stigmatic pollination produced more seed set than did either intrastylar pollination method. For selfed flowers, intrastylar pollination methods generally resulted in more seed set but this was statistically nonsignificant. Significant reciprocal differences were found among crosses of ‘Harmony’, ‘Cinnabar’, and ‘Enchantment’ no reciprocal differences existed among ‘Joan Evans’ crosses. Seed set was highly correlated with pod width, length, and days to maturity.

Open access

Brent K. Harbaugh and Richard H. Mattson

Abstract

Eight lacewing (Chrysopa earned) larvae per greenhouse snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus), released 4 at a time twice during 8 weeks effectively controlled aphids (Myzus persicae). Two initial sprays of malathion and nicotine sulfate 1 week apart followed by release of 4 lacewing larvae per plant also were effective. Flowers produced under chemical or biological control systems were equal in quality. Lacewing larvae in a 21°C greenhouse required a week longer to effectively control aphids than those in a 24°C greenhouse.