Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Nora M. Bello x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Yinping Li, Raymond A. Cloyd and Nora M. Bello

Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, is one of the most destructive insect pests of greenhouse-grown horticultural crops. The primary method of managing western flower thrips populations involves applications of insecticides; however, there is no information associated with the effect of the insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, or the entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea, on western flower thrips pupae in growing media. Therefore, four laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pyriproxyfen and I. fumosorosea applied as a drench to growing media on western flower thrips pupae. Expt. 1 evaluated the efficacy of pyriproxyfen and I. fumosorosea on western flower thrips pupae. Based on the results from Expt. 1, Expt. 2 assessed the effect of pyriproxyfen in two growing media (LC1 and BM1) on western flower thrips pupae. Expts. 3 and 4 determined the residual activity of pyriproxyfen in growing media on western flower thrips pupae 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after treatments were applied. The pyriproxyfen treatment resulted in a significantly lower estimated mean probability of western flower thrips adults captured on yellow sticky cards (17%) compared with the water control (59%), untreated check (88%), and two I. fumosorosea treatments (46% for 1.0 g and 41% for 2.0 g of Ancora) in Expt. 1. However, for the two growing media in Expt. 2, the estimated mean probability of western flower thrips adults captured on yellow sticky cards was not significantly different between the pyriproxyfen treatment (LC1 = 15%; BM1 = 12%) and the water control (LC1 = 41%; BM1 = 24%). For either the pyriproxyfen treatment or the untreated check, there was no evidence of a significant difference between the two growing media on the estimated mean probability of western flower thrips adults captured on yellow sticky cards. Furthermore, there was no evidence of any residual activity 3 days after drench applications of pyriproxyfen. The results of the study have demonstrated that drench applications of pyriproxyfen are not affecting survival of western flower thrips pupae.

Free access

Joshua K. Craver, Chad T. Miller, Kimberly A. Williams and Nora M. Bello

Intumescences are a physiological disorder characterized by hypertrophy and possibly hyperplasia of plant tissue cells. Ultimately, this disorder results in the death of the affected cells. Previous observations and research suggest that the quality and quantity of light to which plants are exposed may be a factor in development of the disorder. The purpose of this study was to assess the preventive effect of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation on intumescence development in ornamental sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas). Two sweetpotato cultivars, Sidekick Black and Ace of Spades, were grown under light treatments consisting of 1) normal greenhouse production conditions; 2) supplemental UVB lighting; 3) supplemental UVB lighting with Mylar® sleeves over the lamps to block UVB radiation; and 4) control lighting with full spectrum lamps. Treatments were administered for 2 weeks, and the experiment was repeated twice. ‘Ace of Spades’ was highly susceptible to intumescence development, whereas ‘Sidekick Black’ was much less susceptible to the disorder. For ‘Ace of Spades’, the addition of UVB radiation significantly reduced the number of leaves affected with intumescences when compared with plants grown under the other light treatments; this UVB effect was not apparent for ‘Sidekick Black’. Furthermore, there was no evidence for reduced plant growth under UVB light in either cultivar, but side effects from the radiation included leaf discoloration and deformities. This study indicates a cultivar-specific effect of UVB light in preventing intumescence development on ornamental sweetpotato, therefore suggesting a potential genetic component in intumescence susceptibility. These results provide further insight in better understanding intumescence development and how to prevent the disorder.